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Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2007) 54 (4): 779–781.
Published: 01 October 2007
...John F. Schwaller Tlacuilolli: Style and Contents of the Mexican Pictorial Manuscripts with a Catalog of the Borgia Group. By Karl Anton Nowotny. Translated from the German (1961) and edited by George A. Everett Jr. and Edward B. Sisson. (Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, 2005. xxi + 387 pp...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2016) 63 (4): 721–728.
Published: 01 October 2016
.... Here I discuss the “leather codex,” a suspicious document that a Canadian collector acquired around 1984 and made available to scholars in 1987 ( fig. 1 ). 1 It consists of twelve palm-size leather strips tied together with strings. I group its text and images into four sections. Folios I through VI...
FIGURES
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2013) 60 (3): 351–361.
Published: 01 July 2013
... America: An Overseas Colony of a Continental Empire, 1804–1867 . New York : Oxford University Press . Guest Editor’s Introduction: Individuals and Groups of Mixed Russian-­Native Parentage in Siberia, Russian America, and Alaska Sergei Kan, Dartmouth College The four articles...
Image
Published: 01 January 2018
Figure 1. The Petén lakes region, showing Contact-period ethnopolitical groups and sites mentioned in the text Figure 1. The Petén lakes region, showing Contact-period ethnopolitical groups and sites mentioned in the text More
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2017) 64 (4): 551–552.
Published: 01 October 2017
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2018) 65 (1): 187–188.
Published: 01 January 2018
...: stronger groups controlled the major rivers and their relatively abundant resources. Weaker ones were pushed into resource-poor hinterlands, where they scratched out a living and remained unchanged for centuries. Cipolletti stands this argument on its head. “It was precisely among the hinterland groups...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2019) 66 (1): 213–216.
Published: 01 January 2019
... the received notions and received knowledge of the generations,” writes David Treuer in the Los Angeles Times (13 May 2016), “but that is exactly what ‘The Other Slavery’ does.” Treuer and other reviewers are especially impressed by Reséndez’s dramatic account of Caribbean groups who were hunted down long...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2019) 66 (4): 750–752.
Published: 01 October 2019
... not so sure. For the previous at least twenty years, they noted, rubber barons had moved deep into the Peruvian Amazon. At first, many native groups had been willing to work in exchange for tools, cloth, and other useful things. They stopped producing their own food and added it to the bill. Later...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2018) 65 (2): 338–339.
Published: 01 April 2018
....) Copyright 2018 by American Society for Ethnohistory 2018 “On a hot day in May 1887, a group of Bolivian soldiers halted their march across a flat savanna laced by lakes and tributaries of the Amazon. They were taking ten indigenous prisoners back to their headquarters in Trinidad, the local capital...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2018) 65 (2): 215–246.
Published: 01 April 2018
... to about five hundred residents and to various organizations and societies specifically relating to the revitalization of Arikara culture and language. The Nishu project aligns well with community-based organizations like ReeFit Nation and the Arikara Community Action Group, which advocate for Arikara...
FIGURES | View All (8)
Image
Published: 01 January 2018
Figure 1. Six-cord color groups on a Santa Valley khipu (UR 89). Photo by Gary Urton Figure 1. Six-cord color groups on a Santa Valley khipu (UR 89). Photo by Gary Urton More
Image
Published: 01 April 2021
Figure 5. Snatelum ego-network, illustrating connections to thirty important people or groups. Figure 5. Snatelum ego-network, illustrating connections to thirty important people or groups. More
Image
Published: 01 April 2021
Figure 3. Slabebkud ego-network, illustrating connections to fourteen important people or groups of people. Figure 3. Slabebkud ego-network, illustrating connections to fourteen important people or groups of people. More
Image
Published: 01 April 2021
Figure 7. Shashia ego-network, illustrating connections to fifty important people or groups throughout and beyond the Salish Sea. Figure 7. Shashia ego-network, illustrating connections to fifty important people or groups throughout and beyond the Salish Sea. More
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2018) 65 (1): 1–23.
Published: 01 January 2018
...Figure 1. Six-cord color groups on a Santa Valley khipu (UR 89). Photo by Gary Urton Figure 1. Six-cord color groups on a Santa Valley khipu (UR 89). Photo by Gary Urton ...
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Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2012) 59 (1): 141–162.
Published: 01 January 2012
...Mary-Elizabeth Reeve; Casey High This article examines the shifting nature of interethnic relations between two indigenous groups in Amazonian Ecuador, the Curaray River group of lowland Kichwa and the neighboring Waorani of the Curaray region. Waorani and Curaray Kichwa interaction from the 1930s...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2014) 61 (3): 549–574.
Published: 01 July 2014
... the process of formation of indigenous leaders and indigenous political organizations among three Kaiabi groups—Xingu, Teles Pires, and Rio dos Peixes—following the relocation of the majority of Kaiabi to Xingu Park starting in the 1960s. New models of leadership emerging from interaction with other...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2012) 59 (4): 739–764.
Published: 01 October 2012
... the conquest, spoke Nahuatl as a language of commerce and communication in order to operate among a diverse group of indigenous ethnicities. This article investigates the use of Nahuatl among nonindigenous persons who were not a part of early evangelization. Drawing on dozens of documents, this article...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2001) 48 (3): 473–494.
Published: 01 July 2001
... history of the contemporary Houma traces the group's origin to Native Americans of the Houma and other tribes who moved into the bayou country of southeastern Louisiana during the late eighteenth or early nineteenth centuries. However,anthropologists and historians from the Bureau of Indian Affairs have...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2011) 58 (1): 91–112.
Published: 01 January 2011
... shed light on several aspects of Indian political and diplomatic relationships in this area. This article holds that the spread of rumors and tales from one people to the next represents only the most visible of a great variety of interactions among the Indian groups of the valley, and therefore stands...