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Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2012) 59 (4): 675–690.
Published: 01 October 2012
... by American Society for Ethnohistory 2012 The Expansion of Nahuatl as a Lingua Franca among Priests in Sixteenth-Century­ Mexico John F. Schwaller, SUNY Potsdam Abstract. This article examines the practice of ordaining young men because of their personal language ability...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2012) 59 (4): 739–764.
Published: 01 October 2012
... examines how Nahuatl was used as a lingua franca among this diverse group of individuals living on the frontier. In these cases, like the one from Motines, Nahuatl served as the common language that connected various ethnic groups in the area. An analysis of quotidian Nahuatl use among secular individuals...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2012) 59 (4): 765–783.
Published: 01 October 2012
...Laura E. Matthew; Sergio F. Romero Nahuatl has often been described as a lingua franca in colonial Central America, but this conclusion has rested on a narrow range of Spanish and Nahuatl-language documents. In this article we broaden the evidentiary base, analyzing a corpus of forty-six Nahuatl...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2012) 59 (4): 785–790.
Published: 01 October 2012
...Caterina Pizzigoni This special issue shows that Nahuatl was not a standard lingua franca spread across Mexico, but was used flexibly and spontaneously by people of many kinds for many different purposes, varying greatly according to the location, the ethnicity, and the social status of speakers...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2012) 59 (4): 667–674.
Published: 01 October 2012
.... The essays in this special issue focus on one particular piece of this puzzle: the use of Nahuatl as a lingua franca, vehicular language, and language of quotidian interactions in multilingual regions throughout colonial Mesoamerica.1 By way of intro- duction, I offer the following framework...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2018) 65 (1): 179–180.
Published: 01 January 2018
... self-governing Indian barrios were transformed into four autonomous towns on the outskirts of the Spanish city. While Nahuatl continued to be used for record keeping and as an indigenous lingua franca, most Indian officials were now fluent in Spanish, and the ethnicities that migrants brought with them...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2017) 64 (3): 442–443.
Published: 01 July 2017
... in diplomacy and kinship, and communicated across the five major language groups of the region through lingua francas, ceremonies and rituals, maps, and iconography. These indigenous networks would later shape and constrain the ambitions of sixteenth- and seventeenth-century French, Spanish, and English...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2015) 62 (3): 497–524.
Published: 01 July 2015
... from Nahuatl written in central Mexico is the retention of the final vowel in the preterit, observed by Karen Dakin in colonial-­era documents from other parts of southern Mesoamerica, suggesting some influence of the archaic form of Nahuatl used as a lingua franca.24 For example, on page 6...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2003) 50 (4): 753–758.
Published: 01 October 2003
... a minimal historic contextualization and outlines the table of contents. The second presents a wide-ranging discussion of the factors that contribute to language maintenance and shift. Multilingualism, bilingualism, linguae francae...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2015) 62 (3): 623–649.
Published: 01 July 2015
... 1992; Nesvig 2012). Nevertheless, as the Spanish moved south, they encountered native societies where knowledge of Nahuatl was less common. When they crossed into the highlands of Guatemala, Nahuatl was no longer a lingua franca. Few Maya seemed to know it, and the Kaqchikel and K’iche...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2019) 66 (2): 301–328.
Published: 01 April 2019
... as glossonyms for these speakers. Here, we use the term Pipil in order to avoid ambiguity with the Nahuatl of central Mexico. Nahuatl became a Mesoamerican lingua franca well before the sixteenth century, and this in combination with the widespread distribution of its speakers (and of closely related...
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Includes: Supplementary data
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2015) 62 (3): 553–572.
Published: 01 July 2015
... to the present shows Maya writing first for themselves and for readers of the elite lingua franca, Ch’olti’an, followed by a period of time in the colonial and early Republican periods in which writing in highland lan- guages served community internal purposes but always with the expected Hispanic...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2018) 65 (4): 597–620.
Published: 01 October 2018
... the door to considering them “peut-être caraïbisés.” 70 Given recent research on multilingualism in the Guianas, the Maraon could have been speakers of a now-lost Arawakan language who used Galibi (Carib) or/and Aruã as a lingua franca, depending on where they lived. For instance, the Maraon living...
FIGURES
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2010) 57 (1): 1–9.
Published: 01 January 2010
... authority? Where is control of codes lodged? What roles do “cultural privacy” and vernacularity play on the one hand, or lingua franca expansion on the other? The 2007 session took place at the portal of two larger ventures. One is the quest for a more omnidirectional grammatology, suited...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2015) 62 (3): 597–621.
Published: 01 July 2015
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2015) 62 (3): 409–420.
Published: 01 July 2015
... Romero (this issue) shows that Spanish evangelization, despite no small reluctance, had to accommodate indigenous linguistic and referential criteria to be able to reach their audience; the lingua franca of Nahuatl only went so far. Atten- tion to the social space of literacy spotlights precisely...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2010) 57 (1): 117–133.
Published: 01 January 2010
... of nearness conveyed by the locative “-nahuac” is more difficult. To solve this problem, the glyph incorporates the speaking mouth in order to invoke the phonologically similar word “nahuatl,” which refers to the lingua franca of the Aztec or Mexica empire.4 Given the fact that social life...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2003) 50 (2): 349–400.
Published: 01 April 2003
... The Symbolic Construction of Community . London: Tavistock. Connerton, Paul 1989 How Societies Remember . Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. Dakin, Karen 1981 The Characteristics of a Nahuatl Lingua Franca. Texas Linguistics Forum 18 : 55 -67. Dyckerhoff, Ursula 1979 Forged Village...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2005) 52 (1): 137–166.
Published: 01 January 2005
... or Bislama—the pid- gin lingua franca of Vanuatu). They both aspire to reach local, regional, and international audiences. They are both ardent nationalists who ponder questions about women’s place in the creation of a nation. But their trajec- tories have diverged significantly on how they see...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2005) 52 (2): 371–406.
Published: 01 April 2005
... . Toronto: McClelland and Stewart. 1992 When the Mother of the Race Is Free: Race,Reproduction, and Sexuality in First Wave Feminism. In Gender Conflicts: New Essays in Women's History . Franca Iacovetta and Mariana Valverde, eds. Pp. 3 -26. Toronto: University of Toronto Press. Van Kirk, Sylvia...