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fishery

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Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2008) 55 (1): 87–118.
Published: 01 January 2008
...Dorothee Schreiber In the 1890s native fisheries stood in the way of expanding industrial and sport fisheries in Canada. Federal regulations denied a commercial component to native fisheries, restricted harvesting to designated open seasons, and outlawed the technologically specialized and place...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2020) 67 (2): 191–220.
Published: 01 April 2020
... area. The analysis also highlights how the messages of these narratives are just as pertinent today as they were in the past. Copyright 2020 by American Society for Ethnohistory 2020 salmon oral traditions reciprocity power Northwest Coast Interior Plateau fisheries Long ago all...
FIGURES | View All (4)
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2016) 63 (3): 577–578.
Published: 01 July 2016
... ways.” They were the “dominant form of non-white labor” (5). Bound Indian laborers, who “likely numbered in the thousands” (14), performed a variety of tasks associated with “ironworks, fisheries, livestock raising, extensive agriculture, provincial armies, and other enterprises that required unusually...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2015) 62 (4): 781–801.
Published: 01 October 2015
..., heralding a welcome end to the long winter season when food preserves had reached their lowest levels. Grease rendered from this small fish was a dietary staple of the Nisg̲a’a and their north coast neigh- bors, and every spring several thousand people congregated at Ts’imk’olhl Da’oots’ip (Fishery...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2007) 54 (2): 337–343.
Published: 01 April 2007
... of the Native languages, particu- larly the Lower Chinookan language” (xv). According to Aguilar, the roar of the Columbia River at the Celilo Falls and Five Mile Rapids fisheries was snuffed out for good and some Chinookan groups were “annihilated into extinction, just like some of the Chinook salmon...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2004) 51 (1): 137–170.
Published: 01 January 2004
...: ‘‘Probably the original families of each band, perhaps only the chief and relatives, became the nobility; while all accessions to the band were classed as common people, without any rights to land or fisheries’’ (ibid.: 581). The hunting-territory, root-digging grounds, berrying-resorts...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2016) 63 (4): 621–643.
Published: 01 October 2016
... in Orland, a small town near the Penobscot River’s mouth northeast of Verona Island. Secluded from boat travel along the deep western channel of the island, Orland, with several pre-European burial sites dating back five thousand years, offered a rich anadromous fishery in the spring, but the winter camp...
FIGURES
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2009) 56 (3): 521–524.
Published: 01 July 2009
... as they clung to high- minded ideals of Indian redemption (“Lamanism”) anchored in the Book of Mormon (95). The outcome was “bleakly conventional” and mirrored that of other settler societies across the West (55). With the Indians gone, the settlers transformed the lake into a fishery and resort...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2009) 56 (3): 525–526.
Published: 01 July 2009
... was “bleakly conventional” and mirrored that of other settler societies across the West (55). With the Indians gone, the settlers transformed the lake into a fishery and resort and promoted Utah as a land of lakes. By the mid-twentieth century, however, local histories had already reinterpreted...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2009) 56 (3): 527–529.
Published: 01 July 2009
... was “bleakly conventional” and mirrored that of other settler societies across the West (55). With the Indians gone, the settlers transformed the lake into a fishery and resort and promoted Utah as a land of lakes. By the mid-twentieth century, however, local histories had already reinterpreted...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2009) 56 (3): 529–530.
Published: 01 July 2009
... was “bleakly conventional” and mirrored that of other settler societies across the West (55). With the Indians gone, the settlers transformed the lake into a fishery and resort and promoted Utah as a land of lakes. By the mid-twentieth century, however, local histories had already reinterpreted...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2009) 56 (3): 531–532.
Published: 01 July 2009
... was “bleakly conventional” and mirrored that of other settler societies across the West (55). With the Indians gone, the settlers transformed the lake into a fishery and resort and promoted Utah as a land of lakes. By the mid-twentieth century, however, local histories had already reinterpreted...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2009) 56 (3): 532–534.
Published: 01 July 2009
... was “bleakly conventional” and mirrored that of other settler societies across the West (55). With the Indians gone, the settlers transformed the lake into a fishery and resort and promoted Utah as a land of lakes. By the mid-twentieth century, however, local histories had already reinterpreted...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2009) 56 (3): 534–535.
Published: 01 July 2009
... was “bleakly conventional” and mirrored that of other settler societies across the West (55). With the Indians gone, the settlers transformed the lake into a fishery and resort and promoted Utah as a land of lakes. By the mid-twentieth century, however, local histories had already reinterpreted...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2009) 56 (3): 536–537.
Published: 01 July 2009
... was “bleakly conventional” and mirrored that of other settler societies across the West (55). With the Indians gone, the settlers transformed the lake into a fishery and resort and promoted Utah as a land of lakes. By the mid-twentieth century, however, local histories had already reinterpreted...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2009) 56 (3): 538–539.
Published: 01 July 2009
... was “bleakly conventional” and mirrored that of other settler societies across the West (55). With the Indians gone, the settlers transformed the lake into a fishery and resort and promoted Utah as a land of lakes. By the mid-twentieth century, however, local histories had already reinterpreted...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2009) 56 (3): 539–542.
Published: 01 July 2009
... as they clung to high- minded ideals of Indian redemption (“Lamanism”) anchored in the Book of Mormon (95). The outcome was “bleakly conventional” and mirrored that of other settler societies across the West (55). With the Indians gone, the settlers transformed the lake into a fishery and resort...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2009) 56 (3): 542–544.
Published: 01 July 2009
... was “bleakly conventional” and mirrored that of other settler societies across the West (55). With the Indians gone, the settlers transformed the lake into a fishery and resort and promoted Utah as a land of lakes. By the mid-twentieth century, however, local histories had already reinterpreted...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2009) 56 (3): 544–545.
Published: 01 July 2009
... was “bleakly conventional” and mirrored that of other settler societies across the West (55). With the Indians gone, the settlers transformed the lake into a fishery and resort and promoted Utah as a land of lakes. By the mid-twentieth century, however, local histories had already reinterpreted...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2009) 56 (3): 546–547.
Published: 01 July 2009
... as they clung to high- minded ideals of Indian redemption (“Lamanism”) anchored in the Book of Mormon (95). The outcome was “bleakly conventional” and mirrored that of other settler societies across the West (55). With the Indians gone, the settlers transformed the lake into a fishery and resort...