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federal recognition

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Journal Article
Ethnohistory (1 January 2015) 62 (1): 145–167.
Published: 01 January 2015
... Coushatta marketing techniques over time. As members of the Coushatta community in Louisiana pushed for federal recognition, basketry became an important symbol of potential economic self-sufficiency and indigenous identity. After federal recognition, basketry served as an important part of the community's...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (1 July 2012) 59 (3): 654–656.
Published: 01 July 2012
...Jessica R. Cattelino Recognition Odysseys: Indigeneity, Race, and Federal Tribal Recognition Policy in Three Louisiana Indian Communities . By Klopotek Brian . ( Durham, NC : Duke University Press , 2011 . xii + 391 pp., acknowledgments, introduction, appendix, notes, bibliography...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (1 July 2014) 61 (3): 583–585.
Published: 01 July 2014
..., afterword, appendix, index. $26.95 paper.) Melissa Rinehart, Independent Scholar This sourcebook explores the bureaucratic quagmire native communi- ties have to navigate when seeking state and federal recognition. The first four chapters examine contested notions of race and identity often veiling...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (1 April 2011) 58 (2): 331–332.
Published: 01 April 2011
... ever adapting to the constantly changing world of both federal policy and the regional political economy of the twentieth century” (5). To explain the origins of the current dispute with the Cherokee Nation over federal recognition of the Delaware Tribe, Obermeyer reveals the nuances of both...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (1 July 2013) 60 (3): 505–536.
Published: 01 July 2013
... military commanders adopted the system, and provided Tlingit leaders with papers recognizing their position and authority, which were likewise carefully preserved. This essay contends that papers of introduction and recognition were conceptualized by Tlingit leaders with the “reverence” accorded in...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (1 January 2015) 62 (1): 184–185.
Published: 01 January 2015
... delves into the complex relationships between long-­standing and recently recognized Indian tribes as well as those seek- ing to gain federal recognition. Miller argues that established tribes oppose the recognition of nontribal entities for a variety of reasons, ranging from disbelief that the...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (1 July 2012) 59 (3): 645–646.
Published: 01 July 2012
.../00141801-1587559 Recognition Odysseys: Indigeneity, Race, and Federal Tribal Recognition Policy in Three Louisiana Indian Communities. By Brian Klopotek. (Dur- ham, NC: Duke University Press, 2011. xii + 391 pp., acknowledgments, introduction, appendix, notes, bibliography, index. $24.95 paper...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (1 July 2011) 58 (3): 549–551.
Published: 01 July 2011
... existence” (191). O’Brien concludes by discussing the irony of how, although these stories continue to feed the assumption that there are no Indians in New Eng­land, tribes use information from these sources in their claims for federal recognition. This reader wishes that she had also considered how...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (1 January 2008) 55 (1): 166.
Published: 01 January 2008
... Reviews Taking Charge: Native American Self-Determination and Federal Indian Policy, 1975–1993. By George Pierre Castile. (Tucson: University of Ari- zona Press, 2006. 164 pp., introduction, epilogue, notes, references, index. $35.00 cloth.) Sovereignty Matters: Locations of Contestation and...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (1 July 2004) 51 (3): 658–660.
Published: 01 July 2004
... for justice appealed to democracy and self- determination, Lomawaima and Wilkins predicate their argument on their faith in the rule of law—American principles all. The recognition of the sovereign rights and powers of tribal nations, in other words, is woven into the very fabric of the federal...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (1 January 2016) 63 (1): 119–142.
Published: 01 January 2016
... their intrinsic rights in an emerging economy of plenty.58 Both because of and despite their political disenfranchisement, they com- municate directly with federal government officials, nation to nation, seeking recognition of their sovereignty as they define a future in which all are responsible for...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (1 October 2017) 64 (4): 471–495.
Published: 01 October 2017
... Dance federal recognition A comparative analysis of Native Californian experiences in colonialism from the Spanish missions through the twentieth century shows how social and economic institutions structured pluralistic communities of the past as well as government-to-tribe policies of today...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (1 April 2009) 56 (2): 313–315.
Published: 01 April 2009
... Sovereignty will surely stand as a model for interdisciplinary theorizing about indigenous politics and nationhood. DOI 10.1215/00141801-2008-062 Forced Federalism: Contemporary Challenges to Indigenous Nationhood. By Jeff Corntassel and Richard C. Witmer II. Foreword by Lindsay G...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (1 October 2003) 50 (4): 671–695.
Published: 01 October 2003
...Izumi Ishii In the early-nineteenth-century Cherokee Nation, alcohol and politics inextricably intertwined. In defiance of the federal government's attempts to regulate alcohol in Indian country, some Cherokee headmen encouraged the liquor traffic within the Nation and personally profited from its...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (1 January 2009) 56 (1): 35–67.
Published: 01 January 2009
... context. It considers the blockade not as a manifestation of inherent indigenous environmentality but as a complex phenomenon predicated on Anishinaabe people's desires for self-determination, recognition of rights, and the power to decide what takes place on land they perceive as theirs. More broadly, it...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (1 January 2009) 56 (1): 1–34.
Published: 01 January 2009
..., Rogers's self-representation as a cowboy limited the public's recognition of him as an Indian. American Society for Ethnohistory 2009 Baillargeon, Morgan, and Leslie Heyman Tepper 1998 Legends of Our Times: Native Cowboy Life . Vancouver: University of British Columbia Press. Beider, Robert...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (1 July 2009) 56 (3): 423–447.
Published: 01 July 2009
... viewed as pretenders. During this campaign, the Mississippi Choctaws made a number of requests, including allotments in Indian Territory, access to resources of the Choctaw Nation to benefit their communities in Mis- sissippi, and, finally, federal recognition as Indians with full government...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (1 April 2017) 64 (2): 167–189.
Published: 01 April 2017
... politic, and there is no Indian question and no Indian Department.” The major piece of legislation guiding Canadian federal relations with First Nations, the Indian Act, reinforced Scott’s declaration, promoting an imperial patriarchal system that disregarded Wendat matrifocal traditions. This policy...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (1 October 2002) 49 (4): 743–767.
Published: 01 October 2002
... the federal government guaranteed a winner and a loser.14 As the Yuchi sought recognition for the first time in the public record, their attempt appeared destined to fail not necessarily on merit, but based on dif- fering...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (1 January 2008) 55 (1): 87–118.
Published: 01 January 2008
...Dorothee Schreiber In the 1890s native fisheries stood in the way of expanding industrial and sport fisheries in Canada. Federal regulations denied a commercial component to native fisheries, restricted harvesting to designated open seasons, and outlawed the technologically specialized and place...