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ethnonyms

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Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2019) 66 (2): 249-273.
Published: 01 April 2019
... borderlands archives ethnonyms geographic information system (GIS) In February 1716, the Valencian Jesuit Policarpo Dufo penned an account of a recent raid undertaken against neighboring Indigenous communities in what is now northeastern Argentina. Dufo and 1,500 Guaraní militiamen had set out from...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2012) 59 (1): 79-107.
Published: 01 January 2012
... trading sites, observation posts, or refuges, but such testing has not recovered material culture described in the documents. Part of the explanation for the lack of correspondence between ethnohistory and archaeology is the inadequacy of the Carib ethnonym, which has been manipulated by the political and...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2012) 59 (1): 51-78.
Published: 01 January 2012
... Things . Language and Communication 23 : 409 – 25 . Kurien Prema 1994 Colonialism and Ethnogenesis: A Study of Kerala, India . Theory and Society 23 : 385 – 417 . Larson Pier M. 1996 Desperately Seeking “the Merina” (Central Madagascar): Reading Ethnonyms and Their...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2018) 65 (4): 597-620.
Published: 01 October 2018
.... Second, multilingual sources mean that ethnonyms were transliterated into different languages, which makes identification of ethnic groups open to discussion, notably with the Maraon. 7 Some ethnonyms, such as “Aruã,” refer to both indigenous groups and subgroups (elsewhere called “bands”), while...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2001) 48 (1-2): 293-299.
Published: 01 April 2001
... the treacherous character of what are sometimes called ethnonyms. Schol- ars working on Madagascar have often been ahead of others in question- Tseng 2001.5.7 10:43 The Ethnohistory of Madagascar 297...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2001) 48 (1-2): 319-322.
Published: 01 April 2001
... words, that they cannot be used. The woman cannot therefore officiate! That Ravahiny reigned in the Boina, or Narova in the Menabe, cannot be invoked as a proof of the nonpertinence of the Masikoro ethnonym. That many Vezo...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2008) 55 (2): 287-319.
Published: 01 April 2008
... identities and ethnonyms. Forced reloca- tion was a strategy common to many empires, but the Incas may have uti- lized it to a greater extent than any other expansionist state, affecting nearly every province and radically altering the ethnic landscape of the Andes. The extent of resettlement varied by...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2014) 61 (3): 467-495.
Published: 01 July 2014
... Caribbean islands (fig. 1), the arena of the initial contact between Europeans and “pristine” Amerindians (De La Luz-­Rodríguez 2011; Whitehead 2002). For more than a hundred years, Caribbean historiography has made use of ethnonyms such as Taíno, Carib(e), and Igneri to name both pre-­ Columbian...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2001) 48 (1-2): 237-256.
Published: 01 April 2001
..., Michael, and Andrew Walsh 1997 The Imagined Community of the Antankaraña: Identity, History, and Ritual in Northern Madagascar. Journal of Religion in Africa 27 : 308 -33. Larson, Pier M. 1996 Desperately Seeking “the Merina” (Central Madagascar): Reading Ethnonyms and Their Semantic Fields in...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2006) 53 (3): 507-542.
Published: 01 July 2006
... located around the Trombetas River. The written sources are quite incomplete, one suspects, since only dur- ing the second half of the eighteenth century was direct contact established with some of these entities. Nevertheless, the literature occasionally offers series of ethnonyms linked to...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2010) 57 (4): 651-678.
Published: 01 October 2010
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2017) 64 (2): 271-296.
Published: 01 April 2017
... migrated more frequently. They remained largely isolated from Portuguese communities until the latter decades of the eighteenth century. Within the linguistically ascribed ethnonyms of Tupi and Tapuia existed numerous subgroups. Portuguese settlers ascribed to Jê speakers residing in what is now...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2001) 48 (1-2): 171-204.
Published: 01 April 2001
... both to designate a territory and as an ethnonym. The references he makes to Dian Mammori [Andriamamory], ‘‘the Great’’ (le Grand) of ‘‘Karem- 32 bola land whose severed head was brought to him in 1653...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2018) 65 (4): 575-595.
Published: 01 October 2018
... base had a significant influence in the unfolding of Portuguese conquest and colonization. Another shared trait of Marajó and Itapecuru societies was their social organization, as some autonomous and seminomadic groups occupied both regions. Colonial sources refer to them with a variety of ethnonyms...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2018) 65 (4): 621-645.
Published: 01 October 2018
...–54r, 14 August 1751. 39 These waterfalls are just upriver of Itaituba. 40 According to Queirós ( 1847 : 96–97), the ethnonym means “eaters of jacaré,” the Amazonian caiman. 41 See Daniel 2003 : 379 for a description of the Jaguaim. 42 This site parallels the sedentary...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2001) 48 (1-2): 309-318.
Published: 01 April 2001
...- gascar, something that traditional ethnonyms such as Tandroy, Tanosy, Karem- bola, Masikoro, and Mahafaly do not do. However, ‘‘cactus pastoralist’’ is also a somewhat misleading label, since the people it designates are not purely pas...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2000) 47 (2): 333-368.
Published: 01 April 2000
... Percentage of national Percentage Ethnonym Modern minorities of total Percentage used in Vietnamese...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2001) 48 (1-2): 87-121.
Published: 01 April 2001
... ‘‘Tandroy ‘‘Vezo and ‘‘Masikoro I will not often use these ethnonyms here. Instead, I refer to a group of cactus pastoralists all with different lineages and territories. This points to an important similarity between...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2001) 48 (1-2): 157-170.
Published: 01 April 2001
... Vezo and the Masikoro the ‘‘under ethnicities’’ (sous-ethnies) or the Saka- lava substrats, while knowing that the ethnonym used has a political and ideological connotation? Furthermore, the coastal space of the Fihereña was...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2002) 49 (4): 743-767.
Published: 01 October 2002
... numerous ethnonyms: the Chisca, the Rickohockan, the Tomahitan, and the Westo (Bauxar Hudson et al Waselkov Not until the Yamassee War of do they appear under the ethnonym of Yuchi (Crane Milling...