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epidemic

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Journal Article
Ethnohistory (1 January 2004) 51 (1): 45–71.
Published: 01 January 2004
...Paul Kelton Current scholarship on the impact of epidemics on American Indians is inadequate to explain how Indians survived. Too often Indians are given no credit for being able to combat emergent diseases, and too often epidemics are depicted as completely undermining native religious beliefs...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (1 January 2009) 56 (1): 214–215.
Published: 01 January 2009
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (1 July 2012) 59 (3): 659–661.
Published: 01 July 2012
...Manuella Meyer Diseased Relations: Epidemics, Public Health, and State-Building in Yucatán, Mexico, 1847–1924 . By McCrea Heather . ( Albuquerque : University of Mexico Press , 2011 . 288 pp., acknowledgments, afterword, illustrations, map, bibliography, index . $27.95 paper...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (1 January 2005) 52 (1): 197–198.
Published: 01 January 2005
...Martha Few Book Review Forum A Pest in the Land: New World Epidemics in a Global Perspective.By Suzanne Alchon. (Albuquerque: University of New Mexico Press, 2003. ix + 214 pp., introduction, maps, figures, tables, appendix, epilogue, notes, bibliography, index. $45.00 cloth, $22.95 paper...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (1 January 2005) 52 (1): 198–200.
Published: 01 January 2005
...W. George Lovell Book Review Forum A Pest in the Land: New World Epidemics in a Global Perspective.By Suzanne Alchon. (Albuquerque: University of New Mexico Press, 2003. ix + 214 pp., introduction, maps, figures, tables, appendix, epilogue, notes, bibliography, index. $45.00 cloth, $22.95...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (1 January 2005) 52 (1): 200–201.
Published: 01 January 2005
...David Sowell Book Review Forum A Pest in the Land: New World Epidemics in a Global Perspective.By Suzanne Alchon. (Albuquerque: University of New Mexico Press, 2003. ix + 214 pp., introduction, maps, figures, tables, appendix, epilogue, notes, bibliography, index. $45.00 cloth, $22.95 paper...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (1 October 2019) 66 (4): 623–645.
Published: 01 October 2019
...Rebecca Dufendach Abstract The first encounters between Nahuas and Spaniards from 1519 to 1521 resulted in widespread deaths in the indigenous communities of central Mexico. Although the first recorded disease epidemic is often acknowledged as a factor in the loss of rule to the invaders...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (1 July 2002) 49 (3): 507–543.
Published: 01 July 2002
...Fernando Santos-Granero The killing of alleged children sorcerers has been widely reported among the Arawak of eastern Peru. Accusations of child sorcery multiplied at junctures of increased outside pressures marked by violence, displacement, and epidemics. Mythical foundations for this belief are...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (1 January 2002) 49 (1): 123–169.
Published: 01 January 2002
..., and large parts of their territory were lost. The greatest loss occurred in the years from about 1636 to 1641, when Pueblo populations, already diminished as a result of various forms of Spanish exploitation, flight from the region, and, perhaps, earlier epidemics, suffered a major disease event that...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (1 July 2013) 60 (3): 485–504.
Published: 01 July 2013
..., the Dena'ina contextualized the turmoil not as the oppressive actions of invaders but as shaman-induced intracultural turmoil, thereby shaping the narrative in their own historical terms and negating the power of the occupier to frame history. Third, after the 1836–40 smallpox epidemic, many Dena'ina...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (1 July 2007) 54 (3): 473–508.
Published: 01 July 2007
... particular, accelerated their depopulation when they endured back-to-back years of epidemics and starvation. This raises important questions about the specific influence of death customs and other practices used by Amerindian groups in response to depopulation following contact with Euro-Americans...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (1 July 2005) 52 (3): 503–532.
Published: 01 July 2005
... with necessary items for the spirit's journey to the afterlife. The second was to cease hunting for one year. In 1846 some fur traders observed unprecedented departures from these customs, due perhaps to the influence of the fur trade,missionaries, or repeated epidemics. Although conditions seem to...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (1 July 2001) 48 (3): 518–519.
Published: 01 July 2001
... spread of the most serious epidemics and chronic afflic- tions: smallpox, venereal diseases, and tuberculosis (the latter Boyd argues were indigenous to the Americas but were introduced as new variants to the Northwest Coast with the arrival of Europeans), malaria, smallpox again along with dysentery...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (1 July 2014) 61 (3): 582–583.
Published: 01 July 2014
... inactions are every bit as important as microbes. Daschuk documents the ravages of epidemics, the dislocation attendant to changing environ- ments and economies, and finally the generally inept and often malicious policies of the Canadian government that brought the aboriginal popula- tion of the...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (1 April 2016) 63 (2): 441–442.
Published: 01 April 2016
..., infectious diseases, and slave resistance and rebellion. Epidemics of yellow fever, cholera, and smallpox, often associated with the arrival of human cargoes, recurred in Cuba and Brazil in the nineteenth century. Graden argues that the human toll and the anxiety over contagion heightened criticism of the...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (1 July 2014) 61 (3): 580–582.
Published: 01 July 2014
... important as microbes. Daschuk documents the ravages of epidemics, the dislocation attendant to changing environ- ments and economies, and finally the generally inept and often malicious policies of the Canadian government that brought the aboriginal popula- tion of the plains to its nadir by the...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (1 January 2002) 49 (1): 69–121.
Published: 01 January 2002
.... Bulletin of the History of Medicine 8 (2): 151 -91. 1955a The Epidemic of 1830-1833 in California and Oregon. University of California Publications in American Archaeology and Ethnology 43 (3): 303 -26. 1955b The Aboriginal Population of the San Joaquin Valley, California. University of...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (1 January 2002) 49 (1): 171–204.
Published: 01 January 2002
...: Biological and Cultural Consequences of 1492 . Westport,ct: Greenwood. Dittert, Alfred E. Jr., and Fred Plog 1980 Generations in Clay: Pueblo Pottery of the American Southwest . Flag-staff, az: Northland. Dobyns, Henry F. 1963 An Outline of Andean Epidemic History to 1720. Bulletin of the History...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (1 July 2001) 48 (3): 519–521.
Published: 01 July 2001
... stories of disease, both personal ac- counts of particular individuals and communities and mythologized nar- ratives, powerfully convey native explanations for the epidemics and their efforts to combat them. Afflicted communities sometimes blamed them- selves but just as often, if not more often, saw...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (1 April 2017) 64 (2): 341–342.
Published: 01 April 2017
... epidemic diseases caused fully 60 percent of this loss and that lethal violence accounted for less than 4 percent, historian Benjamin Madley argues that the “California Indian catastrophe” was no accidental tragedy but rather a clear-cut case of “genocide as defined by the 1948 UN Genocide Convention” (14...