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culin

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Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2009) 56 (3): 449–477.
Published: 01 July 2009
... pinned with racial or ethnic labels and dismissed as acculturated or Hispanicized, that is, suffering culture and, therefore, identity, loss. Typical of this era was archaeologist Stewart Culin who, in the spring of 1901, was summoned to Cuba by the Pennsylvania Steel Company to investigate...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2015) 62 (1): 119–143.
Published: 01 January 2015
... represent as a matter of heroic deeds. Evaluating the worth of mascots to those who created such popular-­culture notions of the idealized Indian is the crux of this essay in terms of constructing an identity connecting mas- culinity, the body of the Indian as a palimpsest for whiteness, and the insti...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2004) 51 (3): 489–533.
Published: 01 July 2004
... constrained reproductive sex and European bodies. He deemed people and practices that fell outside these categories ‘‘unnatural ‘‘abominable and ‘‘against the divine order’’ (Nuñez de Pineda y Bascuñan 1863 [1673]: 107, 157–9). He associated honor with images of powerful, Spanish, mas- culine soldiers and...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2006) 53 (2): 281–329.
Published: 01 April 2006
... other authors provide as much detail on the impor- tance of spiritual power to femininity as they do on its importance to mas- culinity. Nevertheless, it is likely that female status and identity was also deeply influenced by a woman’s ability to access and exemplify spiritual power.19 The existence...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2004) 51 (4): 811–816.
Published: 01 October 2004
... performance of gender roles signifying the emergence of gender and class hierarchies.1 Interrogating various male and female images to analyze changing definitions of mas- culinity and femininity from the pre-Classic to the post-Classic, her wide- ranging essay reminds us that gender definitions are always...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2004) 51 (4): 817–823.
Published: 01 October 2004
... emergence of gender and class hierarchies.1 Interrogating various male and female images to analyze changing definitions of mas- culinity and femininity from the pre-Classic to the post-Classic, her wide- ranging essay reminds us that gender definitions are always relational, with sexual images providing...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2002) 49 (4): 789–820.
Published: 01 October 2002
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2004) 51 (4): 751–778.
Published: 01 October 2004
... paid special attention to appearance: ‘‘Their features are mas- culine and European, with the exception of the small lengthened Tartar eye which almost universally prevails, and is the only feature of resemblance between them and the Chinese. The complexion is fair and indeed bloom- ing, the women...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2012) 59 (1): 109–139.
Published: 01 January 2012
... found that, even in the absence of common language, Europeans and Indians relied on shared notions of mas- culine hierarchy. Groups of European and Indian men laid the groundwork for subsequent negotiations by ’rst approaching each other in military formations, demonstrating their power...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2005) 52 (4): 689–726.
Published: 01 October 2005