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cowboy

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Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2009) 56 (1): 1–34.
Published: 01 January 2009
... conflicts, then and now, between cowboys and American Indians in the popular realm. Rogers himself was unexpected; he was both a cowboy and an Indian, a conflation that baffled and titillated his urban fan base. Throughout his early career, from approximately 1903 to 1919, Rogers and his audience grappled...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2012) 59 (4): 713–738.
Published: 01 October 2012
... fluency in native culture, as most estancia residents shared ties of kin- ship with pueblos de indios. Moreover, when tensions between employee and employer flared, the mestizo and mulato cowboys frequently fled to Importance of Mestizos and Mulatos as Bilingual Intermediaries 719 Figure 1...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2002) 49 (4): 877–878.
Published: 01 October 2002
... to an American way of life. Younger Comanches now looked like cowboys, showing off ten-gallon hats and boots. An Indian policeman, badge and pistol in full view, stands proudly behind his seated wife, who is dressed in traditional...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2002) 49 (4): 878–880.
Published: 01 October 2002
... to an American way of life. Younger Comanches now looked like cowboys, showing off ten-gallon hats and boots. An Indian policeman, badge and pistol in full view, stands proudly behind his seated wife, who is dressed in traditional...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2015) 62 (3): 421–444.
Published: 01 July 2015
... Humanities Projects (expanded in 2010) . whp.uoregon.edu/Lockhart/index.html . Draper Robert 2007 Twenty-First-Century Cowboys: Why the Spirit Endures . National Geographic , December , 114 – 35 . Durbin Marshall 1969 An Interpretation of Bishop Diego de Landa's Maya Alphabet...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2013) 60 (4): 721–747.
Published: 01 October 2013
..., related to the type of livestock raised. Thus Alvino Celada, a black man recently moved from Amatitlán with his wife and children, made his living as a cowboy (vaquero) along with local ladinos such as Miguel Herrera, Francisco Borjas, and Francisco Escovedo, the latter married to an indigenous...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2011) 58 (2): 197–211.
Published: 01 April 2011
... for Ethnohistory 198 Colin G. Calloway found myself in, of all places, “the Cowboy State,” although given the tur- moil in Vermont surrounding Abenaki tribal politics, fishing rights, and state and federal recognition, it was a pretty good place...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2020) 67 (1): 75–95.
Published: 01 January 2020
...: The Archaeology of a Myth . New York : New York Graphic Society . Smith Andrew Brodie . 2004 . Shooting Cowboys and Indians: Silent Western Films, American Culture, and the Birth of Hollywood . Boulder : University Press of Colorado . Southerton Simon G. 2004 . Losing a Lost Tribe...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2003) 50 (3): 419–445.
Published: 01 July 2003
... cowboys, cowgirls, Mexicans’’ and ‘‘buffa- los, bucking bronchos and Texas steers in wild tumultuous reproductions of western life’’ twice daily (advertisement, Hess Occasional official photographs show Indians from the Ranch...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2018) 65 (2): 215–246.
Published: 01 April 2018
... roots one in time and space, as it is tied to memories of childhood and growing up after the flood: Us kids used to love playing in his garden because the corn was really tall! And we used to play cowboys and Indians! [laughs] and we’d be chasing each other around in this corn . . . But it was just...
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Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2016) 63 (4): 645–669.
Published: 01 October 2016
... on their free-range cattle, the Comcáac themselves wanted self-determination within their hunting grounds. In 1847 a group of cattle raisers from Hermosillo sent one of their Yaqui cowboys to a nearby Comcáac camp to spread false rumors about a coming campaign of the Mexicans against them. 74 On hearing...
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Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2015) 62 (4): 707–727.
Published: 01 October 2015
... to one of his vaqueros [cowboys By matching Nye’s ex-wife­ with a new husband, an Indian man with a high-­status job, Cordua helped ensure her and her children’s future support and security. Leinhard recalled that “the arrangement was a satisfactory one to all concerned. While the squaw...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2019) 66 (1): 21–47.
Published: 01 January 2019
... and indigenous places, networks, and know-how on which Wood and others overlaid their extractive enterprises. An 1870 census suggests George Wood concluded his long career as a cowboy at Nicasio (US Census Bureau 1870 : 13), on land still inhabited by Coast Miwok people. Rancho Nicasio, also owned...
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Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2015) 62 (1): 119–143.
Published: 01 January 2015
... of the open range cowboy” (1999: 20). To maintain the connection to the land and to the past, the idea of the Indian was used. The constructed Indian, obstinate foe of progress, civilization, and Manifest Destiny, was utilized as a foil to the contentions over westward expansion and empire building...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2016) 63 (2): 273–300.
Published: 01 April 2016
... cowboys, cowgirls, Indians, US cavalry, and Mexican horsemen. More than 250 participants reenacted scenes from western life for eager audiences, including the holdup of the overland mail and an Indian attack on an emigrant wagon train. 15 The ’49 Camp envisioned a rough mining camp during the days...
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Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2013) 60 (1): 101–124.
Published: 01 January 2013
... specialized in a distinct type of livestock. The Jesuits selected some Guaraní—those they deemed most capable—to reside in the estancias and work as cowboys and peons. Sometimes the Jesuits entrusted this enterprise to Indians and only inspected the estancia themselves several times a year. At other...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2013) 60 (2): 245–268.
Published: 01 April 2013
... as an occupational category, but Ybarvo lists 5 percent of the popu- lation as cowboys and ranchers in 1792. 22 H. Sophie Burton and F. Todd Smith argue that “the Indian trade did not domi- nate the economy of Natchitoches during the colonial period.” Burton and Roots of Independence...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2007) 54 (1): 129–157.
Published: 01 January 2007
... 145 able to engage in activities coded as male, including fighting bulls and taming horses as she “served different masters as a cowboy.”85 Antonia was careful to explain to the authorities—to whom she even- tually turned herself in—that none of the men with whom she had contact...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2003) 50 (1): 191–220.
Published: 01 January 2003
... was resident on the estates, even though haciendas were the most numerous settlement type in the parish (Alexander Cattle raising was not a labor-intensive activity, and usually only a mayoral (caretaker) and a few cowboys were...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2011) 58 (2): 229–261.
Published: 01 April 2011
... of putting up hay, digging irrigation ditches, herding sheep and cattle in and out of the mountain pastures, and caring for family gardens. There were also seasonal employment opportunities such as sheep-­shearing in spring, potato picking in the fall, seasonal cowboying, and also driving freight...