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cooperation

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Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2001) 48 (3): 533–534.
Published: 01 July 2001
...Kimberly Grimes By Jeffrey H. Cohen. (Austin: University of Texas Press, 1999. xiv + 208 pp., preface, introduction, 20 b&w photos, 10 tables, 3 maps,bibliography, index. $40.00 cloth, $17.95 paper.) 2001 Book Reviews Cooperation...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2009) 56 (2): 285–302.
Published: 01 April 2009
...Ivor Miller Dr. Helen Hornbeck Tanner, a senior research fellow at the Newberry Library, studied American Indian and colonial American history for over six decades. In this interview she discusses little-known themes including African and Indian coexistence and cooperation, beginning in 1619...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2006) 53 (1): 143–172.
Published: 01 January 2006
...—predominantly warrior herdsmen—some saw advantage in cooperation with the British from the beginning; others quickly came to accept the situation when they realized the power of British arms; but some continued to resist and were a persistent problem for the colonial authority. The British side—which eventually...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2011) 58 (1): 65–89.
Published: 01 January 2011
... of Wangunk and English land tenure are compared, including diversified landholdings extending from a village center, cooperation of individual and common rights, and a gendered proprietorship. This discourse suggests that the character of Wangunk ethnicity resonates from the values that motivated their land...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2016) 63 (1): 119–142.
Published: 01 January 2016
...Jennifer Bess While Akimel O'odham agricultural identity is one cornerstone of this study of petitions sent to the federal government, the study's aims include an analysis of the petitions in terms of how their form and content reenact the values of cooperation and cocreation embodied in Akimel...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2019) 66 (1): 1–20.
Published: 01 January 2019
... consent to any jurisdictional changes, significant cross-cultural cooperation in law enforcement, and insistence that non-Indian officials respect Indigenous methods of jurisprudence and learn from them. In each of these campaigns, Indigenous Arizonans articulated a vision of citizenship grounded...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2023) 70 (1): 25–44.
Published: 01 January 2023
... to settle in a liminal Ojibwe hunting territory on the Clinton River. Over five years the settlement expanded, with conflict and cooperation defining Moravian engagement with Ojibwe land tenure and interactions with surrounding communities. Through oratory and formal and informal social practices like...
FIGURES
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2013) 60 (2): 219–243.
Published: 01 April 2013
...Andrew Sturtevant In 1738, the Hurons and Odawas living at the French post of Détroit clashed violently. This episode testifies to the two neighbors' complicated relationship, which had long vacillated between close alliance and cooperation, on one hand, and entrenched resentment and competition...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2020) 67 (1): 149–173.
Published: 01 January 2020
... an extraordinary moment of social rupture and disjuncture, changing the ways that residents of the former haciendas think about the past and relate to one another. Following the turbulence of the reforms of General Juan Velasco’s administration (1968–75), short-lived agricultural cooperatives were established...
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Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2001) 48 (3): 534–536.
Published: 01 July 2001
..., consensual view of the dynamic gender rela- tions within households. Cohen next examines forms of cooperation that bind households together (guelaguetza and compadrazgo) and to the community (tequio, cooperación, servicio, the town’s museum, basketball clubs, and a weaving cooperative...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2015) 62 (1): 193–194.
Published: 01 January 2015
...; their offi- cer corps; and representatives of France’s Native American leaders from as far as the pays d’en haut is that the French leadership faced their great- est challenges in the Seven Years’ War, and one of those challenges would be cooperation and understanding between these different branches...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2015) 62 (1): 192–193.
Published: 01 January 2015
... be cooperation and understanding between these different branches of the same leadership system. Much like the war itself, such cooperation failed. Crouch skillfully takes this beyond the misunderstandings of colonial officers of the Canadian compagnies franches de la marine and regulars of the French...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2011) 58 (3): 359–392.
Published: 01 July 2011
... at the scale of the household, Coast Salish political structures were embedded in regional networks of social relations that could be politically mobilized at various scales of cooperation (Angelbeck 2009; Kennedy 2000, 2007; Miller 1989; Miller and Boxberger 1994; Thom 2005). Therefore, this oft-­told...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2016) 63 (2): 419–420.
Published: 01 April 2016
... this difference to the period following the War of 1812 when US hegemony arrived in the Great Lakes region and to the need for Creole cooperation to influence regional American Indian populations, which the young United States yet feared. As a result, the United States recognized Creole land claims that predated...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2018) 65 (1): 163–164.
Published: 01 January 2018
... diplomatic relations with Spanish authorities, a tactic that Babcock claims reduced cross-cultural violence. Santiago, on the other hand, held that Spaniards used the threat of deportation to coerce Apaches de paz into cooperating. Whereas Santiago’s Jar documented the deportation of Apache captives...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2016) 63 (1): 181–182.
Published: 01 January 2016
... for the political and economic stability enjoyed by settlers led by William Penn. Lenapes promoted coexistence and cooperation on both shores of the Lenapewi- hittuck (Delaware River) and established a cooperative society that, the author argues, deserves acknowledgment. Close attention is paid...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2016) 63 (4): 645–669.
Published: 01 October 2016
... San Xavier , which was stranded on a beach of the Sonoran Desert and was needed for the supply of his companies’ missions on the lower Californian Peninsula. His plan depended on the acceptance and cooperation of those Comcáac families living near the wrecked vessel. Father Salvatierra sensed that he...
FIGURES
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2001) 48 (1-2): 237–256.
Published: 01 April 2001
... been considered commemorative of cooperative relations between the Antankaraña and the French, I must mention a short article concerning the Tsangantsainy writ- ten by a Frenchman named G. Pain who attended the mast...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2015) 62 (4): 729–750.
Published: 01 October 2015
...’ focus on treaty Indians led to the systemic undercount- ing of nontreaty Indians and Métis. Indian agents handed out annuities and took the censuses at the same time. This cut down on the number of trips an Indian agent had to make and created a strong incentive for First Nations to cooperate...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2010) 57 (3): 445–466.
Published: 01 July 2010
... with their subjects and the customs surrounding payment of terrazgo ranged along a continuum from cooperative to conflictive relations. Despite con- siderable variation, in the late colonial period the trend was toward increas- ing levels of conflict, as the following cases illustrate. Cooperation...