1-20 of 670 Search Results for

convent

Sort by
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2013) 60 (1): 173–174.
Published: 01 January 2013
...John F. Schwaller Indigenous Writings from the Convent: Negotiating Ethnic Autonomy in Colonial Mexico . By Díaz Mónica . ( Tucson : University of Arizona Press , 2010 . xii + 229 pp., acknowledgments, introduction, figures, appendixes, notes, bibliography, index . $55.00 cloth...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2001) 48 (3): 543–544.
Published: 01 July 2001
...: Convents and the Spiritual Economy of Cuzco, Peru. By Kathryn Burns. (Durham, NC: Duke University Press, xi + pp., introduction, illustrations, appendices, glossary, bibliography, index. cloth, paper). Susan Elizabeth Ramírez, DePaul University and School of American Re- search Burn’s study...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2014) 61 (4): 681–713.
Published: 01 October 2014
... the chronology and historical content of the First Chronicle found in these books by examining the following: (1) the dates applied to the katun cycles (increments of roughly twenty-year periods) in light of recent archaeological finds from Chichén Itzá, Uxmal, Champotón, and Mayapán; (2) Maya conventions...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2010) 57 (3): 415–444.
Published: 01 July 2010
... in convents, and participation in religious brotherhoods and theatrical performances—their influence in their society becomes apparent. Nahua women's religious responsibilities in Mexico City lay between the officially recognized positions of men in the public arena and women's private responsibilities...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2023) 70 (3): 259–278.
Published: 01 July 2023
... Creek leaders used European concepts of gender against British officials to cement their own authority on Indigenous terms, allowing them to maintain conventional avenues toward power and leadership within the confederacy. j.mccutchen@stthomas.edu Copyright 2023 by American Society...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2005) 52 (2): 255–289.
Published: 01 April 2005
...Hal Langfur Rejecting the conventional presumption that violent indigenous resistance to colonization had become all but ineffectual by the late colonial period in Portuguese America, this article uncovers ample archival evidence of successful raiding and other military maneuvers by Brazil's...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2002) 49 (4): 789–820.
Published: 01 October 2002
...Nancy Fogel-Chance Early records of Western encounters with Native peoples have fixed history within the conventional views of their time. This article examines such a perspective inscribed in a journal written by a British naval commander during an Arctic assignment in the mid-nineteenth century...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2015) 62 (3): 573–595.
Published: 01 July 2015
... in a group's semiotic ideologies. In this essay I examine the role of semiotic ideologies in colonial Maya literacy through an analysis of abbreviation conventions, metalinguistic commentary, and the various kinds of signs explicitly employed in these written incantations' performance: “speech” ( tħan...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2008) 55 (3): 361–391.
Published: 01 July 2008
..., testament and funeral conventions, land measurement, ritual kinship, and the role of lay sodalities emerge from the testaments. American Society for Ethnohistory 2008 Anderson, Arthur J. O., Frances Berdan, and James Lockhart, eds. 1976 Beyond the Codices . Berkeley: University of California...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2014) 61 (4): 655–669.
Published: 01 October 2014
...Alice Te Punga Somerville Conventional narratives of Maori encounters with non-Maori logically cohere around the geographic space of Aotearoa, New Zealand, and tend to focus on the post-1840 (treaty) period and on Maori encounters with Europeans. This article examines two institutions in Parramatta...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2021) 68 (4): 493–518.
Published: 01 October 2021
... on the editorial standards and scholarly conventions of the Text Encoding Initiative (TEI). By comparing and contrasting the advantages and drawbacks of this edition relative to printed works and digital editions, we suggest how methods from the digital humanities can shed new light on texts like the Popol Wuj...
FIGURES
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2021) 68 (4): 455–491.
Published: 01 October 2021
...Jerome A. Offner Abstract Only one of two opening compositions in the Codex Xolotl has been recognized. The conventional version shows the entry of Xolotl, Nopaltzin, and six lesser rulers into the Basin of Mexico from near Tula, Hidalgo, followed by settlement at Xoloc and later a place...
FIGURES | View All (18)
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2016) 63 (2): 215–235.
Published: 01 April 2016
... are not conventional modes of historical writing, either indigenous or Western, but in the first case a Roman Catholic catechism adapted into pictorial form and in the second a religious drama linked to Renaissance and baroque European performance traditions. Both genres had been assimilated into indigenous textual...
FIGURES | View All (4)
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2021) 68 (2): 237–268.
Published: 01 April 2021
... of the region, blending emergent religious, commercial, and military bases for authority with more conventional Coast Salish strategies of patronage and generosity. The authors examine the lives and social connections of three Coast Salish leaders to illustrate how they were able to establish and maintain...
FIGURES | View All (8)
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2002) 49 (4): 885–888.
Published: 01 October 2002
... court records, petitions, and other documents coming out of the convents. Conversely, Kathleen A. Myers and Amanda Powell focus in specifically on the spiritual journals of one particular nun, Sor María de San José, who entered...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2022) 69 (4): 477–491.
Published: 01 October 2022
... in instructing Native girls in the faith so they could become nuns; however, colonial officials rejected this idea because they believed that Indigenous women lacked the abilities required for life in the convent (Muriel 1995 : 26). The first convents founded in New Spain were devoted to Spaniards and criollas...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2010) 57 (1): 117–133.
Published: 01 January 2010
... iconography employs differ- ent types of semiotic conventions that function together or complement each other. The reference to polygraphy only refers explicitly to the icono- graphic script, but I would suggest that it applies equally well to the use of multiple forms of media that he mentions...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2019) 66 (1): 163–166.
Published: 01 January 2019
... of the two Anglo nation-states dominating the region and conventional histories assume that a half-dozen or so self-aware, bounded indigenous nations lived, and live, in the region: Blackfoot, Gros Ventre, Assiniboine, Cree, Saulteaux, Sioux (Lakota, Dakota, Nakoda), and Métis. Treaties and the creation...
FIGURES
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2015) 62 (3): 497–524.
Published: 01 July 2015
... Spanish models were adapted to indigenous conventions, resulting in unique forms of expression and notation. The local, idiosyncratic nature of the manuscript is compa- rable to the complex and contingent articulation of native thought and lan- guage examined by Sergio Romero in this issue.6...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2017) 64 (3): 439–441.
Published: 01 July 2017
...Preston McBride 1 United Nations Treaty Series, “Convention on the Prevention and Punishment of the Crime of Genocide” (9 December 1948), 278–86, here 280. https://treaties.un.org/doc/publication/unts/volume%2078/volume-78-i-1021-english.pdf (accessed 30 August 2015). Ultimately...