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cloth trade

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Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2018) 65 (3): 349–371.
Published: 01 July 2018
... by the reciprocity embedded in the kin networks of Indian women. Indian women processed the furs, which allowed them to exert pressure on the exchange process, transforming the fur trade into the cloth trade. Women’s access to trade goods enhanced their authority, and their access to cloth led to a flowering...
FIGURES
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2005) 52 (4): 727–787.
Published: 01 October 2005
...Marshall Joseph Becker The English term matchcoat derives from an Algonquian root word relating to clothing or dress in general. During the seventeenth century matchcoat came to refer to European-made units of woolen cloth,generally about two meters (a “fathom”) long, that were traded to natives...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2014) 61 (1): 1–25.
Published: 01 January 2014
... clothing. As the RMSC collection shows, it is more appropriate to analyze Seneca trade with European settlements as Seneca-­driven integration rather than colonialism. Following the American Revolution, the Seneca and other Iroquois nations did face American colonialism after a confluence of war...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2016) 63 (2): 237–271.
Published: 01 April 2016
... carbohydrates formed a major component of Comanchero trade, even though one account of 1814 does include 5.5 fanegas of unspecified “provisions” alongside clothing and tobacco (Levine 1991 : 158–59). Looking at Comanche presence on the Southern Plains as a whole, significant input of maize by New Mexican...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2014) 61 (2): 376–379.
Published: 01 April 2014
....) Coffee and Community: Maya Farmers and Fair-Trade Markets . By Lyon Sarah . ( Boulder : University Press of Colorado , 2010 . ix + 266 pp., acknowledgments, introduction, illustrations, bibliography, index . $75.00 cloth, $32.95 paper.) Copyright 2014 by American Society for Ethnohistory...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2014) 61 (2): 367–368.
Published: 01 April 2014
...Michelle LeMaster An Empire of Small Places: Mapping the Southeastern Anglo-Indian Trade, 1732–1795 . By Paulett Robert . ( Athens : University of Georgia Press , 2012 . xii + 259 pp., illustrations, acknowledgments, notes, bibliography, index . $69.95 cloth, $24.95 paper...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2014) 61 (2): 365–366.
Published: 01 April 2014
... for a colonial fort or Indian town, you would change your city clothes for a cheaply made trade shirt, a wool breechcloth, wool leggings, and moccasins. Not only were these clothes more practical for traveling, but they would send a mes- sage to Indians and colonists beyond New Orleans that you were...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2014) 61 (2): 368–370.
Published: 01 April 2014
... for a colonial fort or Indian town, you would change your city clothes for a cheaply made trade shirt, a wool breechcloth, wool leggings, and moccasins. Not only were these clothes more practical for traveling, but they would send a mes- sage to Indians and colonists beyond New Orleans that you were...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2014) 61 (2): 370–372.
Published: 01 April 2014
... for a colonial fort or Indian town, you would change your city clothes for a cheaply made trade shirt, a wool breechcloth, wool leggings, and moccasins. Not only were these clothes more practical for traveling, but they would send a mes- sage to Indians and colonists beyond New Orleans that you were...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2014) 61 (2): 374–375.
Published: 01 April 2014
... for a colonial fort or Indian town, you would change your city clothes for a cheaply made trade shirt, a wool breechcloth, wool leggings, and moccasins. Not only were these clothes more practical for traveling, but they would send a mes- sage to Indians and colonists beyond New Orleans that you were...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2014) 61 (2): 379–380.
Published: 01 April 2014
... for a colonial fort or Indian town, you would change your city clothes for a cheaply made trade shirt, a wool breechcloth, wool leggings, and moccasins. Not only were these clothes more practical for traveling, but they would send a mes- sage to Indians and colonists beyond New Orleans that you were...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2014) 61 (2): 380–382.
Published: 01 April 2014
... for a colonial fort or Indian town, you would change your city clothes for a cheaply made trade shirt, a wool breechcloth, wool leggings, and moccasins. Not only were these clothes more practical for traveling, but they would send a mes- sage to Indians and colonists beyond New Orleans that you were...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2014) 61 (2): 388–390.
Published: 01 April 2014
...-Indian­ Trade, 1732–1795. By Robert Paulett. (Athens: University of Georgia Press, 2012. xii + 259 pp., illustrations, acknowledgments, notes, bibliography, index. $69.95 cloth, $24.95 paper.) Michelle LeMaster, Lehigh University In recent years, there has been a growing trend in early American...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2014) 61 (2): 372–373.
Published: 01 April 2014
... for a colonial fort or Indian town, you would change your city clothes for a cheaply made trade shirt, a wool breechcloth, wool leggings, and moccasins. Not only were these clothes more practical for traveling, but they would send a mes- sage to Indians and colonists beyond New Orleans that you were...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2014) 61 (2): 382–383.
Published: 01 April 2014
... for a colonial fort or Indian town, you would change your city clothes for a cheaply made trade shirt, a wool breechcloth, wool leggings, and moccasins. Not only were these clothes more practical for traveling, but they would send a mes- sage to Indians and colonists beyond New Orleans that you were...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2014) 61 (2): 383–385.
Published: 01 April 2014
... for a colonial fort or Indian town, you would change your city clothes for a cheaply made trade shirt, a wool breechcloth, wool leggings, and moccasins. Not only were these clothes more practical for traveling, but they would send a mes- sage to Indians and colonists beyond New Orleans that you were...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2014) 61 (2): 387–388.
Published: 01 April 2014
... for a colonial fort or Indian town, you would change your city clothes for a cheaply made trade shirt, a wool breechcloth, wool leggings, and moccasins. Not only were these clothes more practical for traveling, but they would send a mes- sage to Indians and colonists beyond New Orleans that you were...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2014) 61 (2): 385–387.
Published: 01 April 2014
... the Southeastern Anglo-Indian­ Trade, 1732–1795. By Robert Paulett. (Athens: University of Georgia Press, 2012. xii + 259 pp., illustrations, acknowledgments, notes, bibliography, index. $69.95 cloth, $24.95 paper.) Michelle LeMaster, Lehigh University In recent years, there has been a growing trend...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2006) 53 (4): 715–752.
Published: 01 October 2006
... of the world may date as far back as Greco-Roman times, and there has been an almost continuous demand in the African interior for manufactured trade goods, especially cloth, beads, and ceramics, originating as far away as Ethnohistory 53:4 (Fall 2006) doi 10.1215/00141801-2006-020 Copyright 2006...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2000) 47 (3-4): 777–790.
Published: 01 October 2000
... Phillips. (Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, xix + pp., foreword, introduction, illustra- tions, tables, notes, index. cloth.) History of the Choctaw, Chickasaw, and Natchez Indians. By H. B. Cush- man. Edited by Angie Debo. Introduction by Clara Sue Kidwell. (Nor- man: University of Oklahoma...