1-20 of 1288 Search Results for

claim

Sort by
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2002) 49 (4): 743–767.
Published: 01 October 2002
...Pamela S. Wallace Complexity in cross-cultural interaction is apparent within the Indian Claims Commission ( icc ) proceedings of the 1950s. The U.S. federal government and Creek Indians both in Oklahoma and east of the Mississippi joined forces to suppress the icc petition of the Yuchi, a small...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2015) 62 (1): 184–185.
Published: 01 January 2015
...David R. M. Beck Claiming Tribal Identity: The Five Tribes and the Politics of Federal Acknowledgment . By Miller Mark Edwin . ( Norman : University of Oklahoma Press , 2013 . xiv + 475 pp., illustrations, foreword, acknowledgments, notes, bibliography, index . $29.95 paper...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2015) 62 (1): 188–190.
Published: 01 January 2015
...Mark R. Scherer Hollow Justice: A History of Indigenous Claims in the United States . By Wilkins David E. . ( New Haven, CT : Yale University Press , 2013 . xix + 249 pp., dedication, preface, tables, notes, bibliography, index . $40.00 cloth.) Copyright 2015 by American Society...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2013) 60 (3): 403–417.
Published: 01 July 2013
... Native Claims Settlement Act, anyone with one-quarter Native blood quantum could participate. Most descendants of Creoles met this requirement and enrolled, angering many Natives who had not identified as Russians. This paper examines the history of the Creoles on Kodiak Island through the eyes...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2022) 69 (1): 129–130.
Published: 01 January 2022
... settler recognition—and de-recognition—are shaped by these contexts. These factors need to be considered when discussing issues of fake claims to Indigeneity, particularly in the northeastern United States, where there is a much longer history of colonial dispossession than in western regions. Indigenous...
Image
Published: 01 October 2023
Figure 3. Territories of the Potawatomi as determined by the Indian Claims Commission, 1978. United States Indian Claims Commission, Indian Land Areas Judicially Established , 1978, map, Library of Congress, https://www.loc.gov/item/80695449/ . More
Image
Published: 01 July 2023
Figure 3. Detail of map showing Indian treaties in Ontario, James L. Morris, 1931, J. L. Morris family fonds, J. L. Morris professional files, F 1060-1-0-51, Archives of Ontario. Note the extended northeastern treaty boundary and the label claiming that the October 1783 treaty ceded lands all More
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2024) 71 (2): 249–269.
Published: 01 April 2024
...Nathan Ince Abstract John Norton (fl. 1770–1823) has long fascinated historians. After having been taken in by the prominent Mohawk leader Thayendanegea Joseph Brant as a young man, Norton claimed to imperial outsiders that he occupied a position of great influence among the Haudenosaunee. Norton...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2001) 48 (1-2): 257–291.
Published: 01 April 2001
... as such. The Mikea of southwestern Madagascar are associated with the forest and foraging and contrasted with Vezo fishers and Masikoro agropastoralists, yet these groups and their economic strategies both intermingle. Mystique, pride, stigma, and resource claims together provide diverse, often conflicting...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2007) 54 (4): 639–668.
Published: 01 October 2007
...Michael Witgen This article examines the social construction of space and identity in the Great Lakes and the western interior of North America. Through analysis of documentary evidence it contrasts the discursive practices of the French empire, which established claims of discovery and possession...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2012) 59 (2): 261–291.
Published: 01 April 2012
... and was an adopted Mohawk and because people have doubted his claim that his father was a Cherokee. This article clarifies Norton's claim to a Cherokee connection and concludes that the evidence overwhelmingly supports the probability that his father was a Cherokee; thus it invites scholars to look at Norton's work...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2023) 70 (2): 153–165.
Published: 01 April 2023
...Gloria P. Lopera-Mesa Abstract Drawing on the author’s experience of collaborative research with the Cañamomo-Lomaprieta people in the western Colombian Andes, this article discusses the challenges of conducting ethnohistorical research on Indigenous land claims from the double role of historian...
FIGURES
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2006) 53 (4): 715–752.
Published: 01 October 2006
...Geoffrey Ross Owens This article examines the precolonial history of the region surrounding Dar es Salaam, Tanzania, through oral traditions and memories about the Shomvi people, who lived in the seventeenth through nineteenth centuries. Elite members of Shomvi settlements claimed “foreign” origins...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2023) 70 (3): 231–258.
Published: 01 July 2023
...Figure 3. Detail of map showing Indian treaties in Ontario, James L. Morris, 1931, J. L. Morris family fonds, J. L. Morris professional files, F 1060-1-0-51, Archives of Ontario. Note the extended northeastern treaty boundary and the label claiming that the October 1783 treaty ceded lands all...
FIGURES | View All (5)
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2011) 58 (2): 293–321.
Published: 01 April 2011
... by the mytho-historical content of the better-known indigenous text, the Popol Vuh. Although the títulos were created for territorial disputes and claims to rights before the Spanish legal system, they also represented Maya-K’iche’ responses to colonial domination and reveal how the Maya K’iche’ perceived...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2005) 52 (1): 81–109.
Published: 01 January 2005
... that are commensurable, predictable, and knowable to outsiders raises major political and ethical dilemmas for Ranonggan leaders. As in other Oceanic polities, the true people of the land are supposed to generously welcome foreigners. Aggressively claiming exclusive rights for oneself or one's group would effectively...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2016) 63 (2): 237–271.
Published: 01 April 2016
... carbohydrates in the form of maize from Spanish-ruled New Mexico and Texas or Native American horticulturalists. This in turn is claimed to have been crucial in structuring Comanche economic and political ties with their neighbors. This article argues instead that the documentary evidence used to support...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2016) 63 (3): 519–540.
Published: 01 July 2016
...Michael Hughes Abstract By 1815 the Red River Métis were coalescing as a social and political group, asserting their rights to land as an indigenous community. Their opponents, the Hudson’s Bay Company, sought to establish a colony at Red River, while their allies, the North West Company, claimed...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2000) 47 (1): 205–225.
Published: 01 January 2000
... lore. Human agency, however, was accorded a significant role in redressing this universal tendency to entropy, and ritual leaders claimed the ability to induce an apocalyptic, earth-renewing fall of fertile soil from the sky. The adoption of Christian understandings of the Apocalypse as the revelation...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2001) 48 (1-2): 31–86.
Published: 01 April 2001
... of trees” by showing how people use trees to orient themselves in place and time, to articulate their relations with other living beings in their immediate and more distant surroundings, and to establish and legitimate claims to land. American Society for Ethnohistory 2001 Adanson, Michel 1763...