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Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2015) 62 (1): 184–185.
Published: 01 January 2015
...David R. M. Beck Claiming Tribal Identity: The Five Tribes and the Politics of Federal Acknowledgment . By Miller Mark Edwin . ( Norman : University of Oklahoma Press , 2013 . xiv + 475 pp., illustrations, foreword, acknowledgments, notes, bibliography, index . $29.95 paper...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2015) 62 (1): 188–190.
Published: 01 January 2015
...Mark R. Scherer Hollow Justice: A History of Indigenous Claims in the United States . By Wilkins David E. . ( New Haven, CT : Yale University Press , 2013 . xix + 249 pp., dedication, preface, tables, notes, bibliography, index . $40.00 cloth.) Copyright 2015 by American Society...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2002) 49 (4): 743–767.
Published: 01 October 2002
...Pamela S. Wallace Complexity in cross-cultural interaction is apparent within the Indian Claims Commission ( icc ) proceedings of the 1950s. The U.S. federal government and Creek Indians both in Oklahoma and east of the Mississippi joined forces to suppress the icc petition of the Yuchi, a small...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2013) 60 (3): 403–417.
Published: 01 July 2013
... Native Claims Settlement Act, anyone with one-quarter Native blood quantum could participate. Most descendants of Creoles met this requirement and enrolled, angering many Natives who had not identified as Russians. This paper examines the history of the Creoles on Kodiak Island through the eyes...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2001) 48 (1-2): 257–291.
Published: 01 April 2001
... as such. The Mikea of southwestern Madagascar are associated with the forest and foraging and contrasted with Vezo fishers and Masikoro agropastoralists, yet these groups and their economic strategies both intermingle. Mystique, pride, stigma, and resource claims together provide diverse, often conflicting...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2007) 54 (4): 639–668.
Published: 01 October 2007
...Michael Witgen This article examines the social construction of space and identity in the Great Lakes and the western interior of North America. Through analysis of documentary evidence it contrasts the discursive practices of the French empire, which established claims of discovery and possession...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2012) 59 (2): 261–291.
Published: 01 April 2012
... and was an adopted Mohawk and because people have doubted his claim that his father was a Cherokee. This article clarifies Norton's claim to a Cherokee connection and concludes that the evidence overwhelmingly supports the probability that his father was a Cherokee; thus it invites scholars to look at Norton's work...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2006) 53 (4): 715–752.
Published: 01 October 2006
...Geoffrey Ross Owens This article examines the precolonial history of the region surrounding Dar es Salaam, Tanzania, through oral traditions and memories about the Shomvi people, who lived in the seventeenth through nineteenth centuries. Elite members of Shomvi settlements claimed “foreign” origins...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2018) 65 (4): 621–645.
Published: 01 October 2018
... and eighteenth centuries, a period when they were invaded by colonial agents. There were other regional systems along the course of the Amazon and its many tributaries that were a part of a similar historical process of refounding identities and claims on land and people involving challenges to leadership...
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Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2019) 66 (2): 249–273.
Published: 01 April 2019
... to Indigenous neighbors to appropriate their lands or delegitimize their sovereignty. The geographical dispersion of colonial records over time has masked the inconsistencies of such claims, and colonial ethnogeographic imaginations thus persist. By reading colonial sources from multiple settlements against one...
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Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2019) 66 (4): 667–688.
Published: 01 October 2019
.... In this network of practices, Classic-, Postclassic-, and colonial-era Mayas linked human bones to enduring personal forces and used bones to support claims of ancestry to specific people. This study explores this feature of Maya life, and then analyzes how Mayas of the last hundred years now value bone more...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2011) 58 (2): 293–321.
Published: 01 April 2011
... by the mytho-historical content of the better-known indigenous text, the Popol Vuh. Although the títulos were created for territorial disputes and claims to rights before the Spanish legal system, they also represented Maya-K’iche’ responses to colonial domination and reveal how the Maya K’iche’ perceived...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2005) 52 (1): 81–109.
Published: 01 January 2005
... that are commensurable, predictable, and knowable to outsiders raises major political and ethical dilemmas for Ranonggan leaders. As in other Oceanic polities, the true people of the land are supposed to generously welcome foreigners. Aggressively claiming exclusive rights for oneself or one's group would effectively...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2016) 63 (3): 469–495.
Published: 01 July 2016
... physically manifested their elite authors’ privileged access to literacy and their influence on local historiography. Furthermore, the títulos redefined the sociopolitical landscape by integrating written records of territorial claims, historical events, social relationships, and political status...
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Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2016) 63 (2): 237–271.
Published: 01 April 2016
... carbohydrates in the form of maize from Spanish-ruled New Mexico and Texas or Native American horticulturalists. This in turn is claimed to have been crucial in structuring Comanche economic and political ties with their neighbors. This article argues instead that the documentary evidence used to support...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2016) 63 (3): 519–540.
Published: 01 July 2016
...Michael Hughes Abstract By 1815 the Red River Métis were coalescing as a social and political group, asserting their rights to land as an indigenous community. Their opponents, the Hudson’s Bay Company, sought to establish a colony at Red River, while their allies, the North West Company, claimed...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2016) 63 (2): 301–325.
Published: 01 April 2016
...Catalina Muñoz Abstract This article examines the ways in which, during the early decades of the twentieth century, Arhuaco leaders of the southern slopes of the Sierra Nevada de Santa Marta in Colombia turned to the state to legitimize and move forward their claims. By so doing, they made...
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Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2016) 63 (4): 697–720.
Published: 01 October 2016
... and shifting. Not only did it facilitate royal efforts to constrain conqueror claims to native wealth, it also contributed to the eventual recognition of native patrimonial lands in Spanish imperial law. Copyright 2016 by American Society for Ethnohistory 2016 native peoples Nahuas Mexico law...
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Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2011) 58 (1): 1–35.
Published: 01 January 2011
...Coll Thrush Food is fundamental. As Felipe Fernández-Armesto has written, food “has a good claim to be considered the world's most important subject. It is what matters most to most people for most of the time” ( Near a Thousand Tables: A History of Food [New York, 2002], ix). We are what we eat...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2000) 47 (1): 205–225.
Published: 01 January 2000
... lore. Human agency, however, was accorded a significant role in redressing this universal tendency to entropy, and ritual leaders claimed the ability to induce an apocalyptic, earth-renewing fall of fertile soil from the sky. The adoption of Christian understandings of the Apocalypse as the revelation...