1-20 of 283 Search Results for

choctaw

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Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2016) 63 (2): 417–418.
Published: 01 April 2016
...Brooke Bauer Osburn challenges us to think about nation building and nationhood among Mississippi Choctaws “as part of a broader Choctaw history” and as “a century of adroit political activism” (213), particularly in terms of Indian identity. Her extensively researched book is a great addition...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2000) 47 (1): 241–248.
Published: 01 January 2000
...E. J. Dickson-Gilmore American Society for Ethnohistory 2000 Review Essay Coming Around: Recent Nim, Choctaw, and Mohawk Ethnohistory E. J. Dickson-Gilmore, Carleton University 5996...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2008) 55 (4): 688–689.
Published: 01 October 2008
... of a select group of tribes in two states: the Mowa Choctaw and Poarch Creek in Alabama and the Mashantucket Pequot, Eastern Pequot Tribe, and Golden Hill Paugussett in Connecticut. Such regionalism is one of the book’s strengths, as Cramer demonstrates that acknowledgment for eastern tribes...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2009) 56 (3): 423–447.
Published: 01 July 2009
...Katherine M. B. Osburn Federal Indian policy during the allotment era intersected with the segregated society of the Jim Crow South to create a market for Indian identity; the discourse of Indian blood was the currency of this realm. For the Mississippi Choctaws, heirs to the failed promises...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2009) 56 (2): 336–338.
Published: 01 April 2009
...Gary C. Cheek, Jr. . Edited by Greg O'Brien. (Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, 2008. v + 265 pp., acknowledgments, editor's introduction, appendixes, contributors, index. $39.95 cloth.) American Society for Ethnohistory 2009 Galloway, Patricia 1995 Choctaw Genesis, 1500-1700...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2010) 57 (4): 756–757.
Published: 01 October 2010
... were felt little and late. Patricia Galloway and George Milne implicitly confirm Jeter’s assessment in their respective investigations of the Choctaws and Natchez, the latter of whom still adhered to Mississippian political and cultural practices into the eighteenth century...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2006) 53 (4): 774–776.
Published: 01 October 2006
...Susan J. Wurtzburg Choctaw Women in a Chaotic World: The Clash of Cultures in the Colonial Southeast. By Michelene E. Pesantubbee. (Albuquerque: University of New Mexico Press, 2005. xi + 208 pp., acknowledgments, introduction, illustrations, bibliography, index. $39.95 paper.) American...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2024) 71 (1): 63–86.
Published: 01 January 2024
...Matthew J. Sparacio Abstract The presence of chilakwa (smallpox) in Choctaw villages between 1747 and 1748 complicated factionalism and civil war. Utilizing Sharla Fett’s approach to health culture—defined as “the social relations of healing”—this article outlines how eighteenth-century Choctaws...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2002) 49 (2): 405–406.
Published: 01 April 2002
... Searching for the Bright Path: The Mississippi Choctaws from Prehistory to Removal. By James Taylor Carson. (Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 1999. xiv + 183 pp., series editors’ introduction, acknowledgments, notes, index...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2009) 56 (1): 217–218.
Published: 01 January 2009
... Region and the ways in which oral history can help scholars “hear and take seriously” the voices of Native peoples (Nancy Oestreich Lurie’s “Mountain Wolf Woman, Sister of Crashing Thunder” and Michelene E. Pesantubbee’s “Choctaw Women Negotiating the Tension between Choc- taw Culture...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2015) 62 (2): 263–284.
Published: 01 April 2015
...Devon A. Mihesuah In response to white settlers' demands for tribal lands in the southeast, Congress passed the Indian Removal Act in 1830. The “Five Tribes”—Cherokees, Choctaws, Chickasaws, Muscogees (Creeks), and Seminoles—were then forced to Indian Territory (now Oklahoma). Natives had access...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2021) 68 (2): 345–347.
Published: 01 April 2021
... documents the creation, development, and eventual closure of the Choctaw Academy located in Great Crossings, Kentucky. US expansion, racist rhetoric, and a Jacksonian ideology of white American identity during the era of forced Indian removal are all common themes as Snyder uses the Choctaw Academy and its...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2009) 56 (2): 269–284.
Published: 01 April 2009
... formally developed code-talking programs. American Society for Ethnohistory 2009 American Indian Magazine 1919 Played Joke on the Huns. 7 ( 2 ): 101 . Beaty, James 1989 Choctaw Codetalker “Just Doing Job” in Smashing Line. McAlester News—Capital and Democrat , 15 November...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2015) 62 (1): 187–188.
Published: 01 January 2015
...., acknowledgments, illustra- tions, notes, bibliography, index. $34.95 cloth.) Rachel Smith Purvis, Yale University Barbara Krauthamer’s new work, Black Slaves, Indian Masters, exam- ines slavery, emancipation, and freedom in the Choctaw and Chickasaw Nations and illuminates the points of connection between...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2023) 70 (3): 259–278.
Published: 01 July 2023
... Indians and Jonathan Bryan .” Georgia Historical Quarterly 73 , no. 2 : 209 – 30 . Galloway Patricia . 1989 . “ The Chief Who Is Your Father: Choctaw and French Views of the Diplomatic Relation .” In Powhatan’s Mantle: Indians in the Colonial Southeast , edited by Waselkov Gregory...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2004) 51 (4): 779–791.
Published: 01 October 2004
... in the group’s origins, artifacts, and survivals of Indian culture, as indicated by the 80 ‘‘Indian’’ words which he collected from Felicitie Billiot (Swanton n.d.; Swanton 1911, 33 [sic Swanton characterized these words as nearly pure Choctaw, but, in fact, the words appear to be Mobilian...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2004) 51 (4): 701–723.
Published: 01 October 2004
... Among the Choctaws, Charles Juzan, a Frenchman, married a niece of Pushmataha, a prominent chief, and John Pitchlynn ‘‘took a wife when a young man from a powerful family of natives16 Nathaniel Folsom, in the Native tradition of sororal polygamy, married two sisters who were nieces of Choctaw chief...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2004) 51 (1): 45–71.
Published: 01 January 2004
..., whose gods might bring salvation from the terrible epidemiological crisis.4 The nightmare of epidemic spared few if any native groups, and the Cherokees and their southeastern neighbors, the Creeks (or Muskogees), Choctaws, and Chickasaws—the Four Nations as they were collectively called—were...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2021) 68 (3): 429–448.
Published: 01 July 2021
... and the Choctaws. These Cherokees were also “charged with more belts” that they were entrusted to deliver to other southern Indian nations. 15 In 1781 Cherokee representatives returned to Detroit with “a Deputation of Principal Chiefs” representing the Shawnees and Delawares. 16 The Cherokee spokesperson...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2006) 53 (4): 769–770.
Published: 01 October 2006
... and the publication history of his book. She follows him through the major episodes of his life, from his early entry into the deerskin trade and activi- ties among the Choctaws to his quarrels with colonial officials and later immersion in the London publishing world. In unearthing new evidence, Braund presents...