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chocolate

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Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2005) 52 (4): 673–687.
Published: 01 October 2005
...Martha Few Chocolate, in the form of a hot chocolate beverage, was widely available to men and women of all ethnic and social groups in late-seventeenth and early-eighteenth-century Santiago de Guatemala, the capital city of colonial Central America. At the same time, chocolate acted as a central...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2007) 54 (2): 273–301.
Published: 01 April 2007
...Keith M. Prufer; W. Jeffrey Hurst Archaeological investigations at a mortuary cave in southern Belize recovered a bowl containing five cacao (chocolate) seeds dating to the fourth or fifth century AD. The context of both the burial and the cacao informs our understanding of the role of chocolate...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2021) 68 (1): 153–154.
Published: 01 January 2021
... paperback.) Copyright 2021 by American Society for Ethnohistory 2021 This edited volume breaks new ground in critical food studies by exploring the allure that Africans, Indians, and Europeans held for ingested commodities such as alcohol, chocolate, peyote, sugar, and tobacco in Mesoamerica...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2019) 66 (4): 721–744.
Published: 01 October 2019
... . Knowlton Timothy W. 2018 . “ Flame, Icons, and Healing: A Colonial Maya Ontology .” Colonial Latin American Review 28 , no. 3 : 392 – 412 . Kufer Johanna , and McNeil Cameron L. 2006 . “ The Jaguar Tree ( Theobroma bicolor Bonpl.) .” In Chocolate in Mesoamerica: A Cultural...
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Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2019) 66 (1): 217–218.
Published: 01 January 2019
... textual sources over images. For instance, written accounts by Sahagún in the Florentine Codex are the only primary material used to contextualize the images at Malinalco, which include cacao pods. There is a missed opportunity to connect this either to the preceding discussion of preconquest chocolate...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2015) 62 (2): 393–394.
Published: 01 April 2015
... with the Vikings and continuing through the early Spanish explorers. More importantly, almost half of the world’s table vegetables originated with native peoples of the Americas, as did domes- ticated turkeys, tobacco, and chocolate. Technological innovation, too, moved west to east. From native peoples...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2015) 62 (3): 469–495.
Published: 01 July 2015
... Edition . Austin : University of Texas Press . McNeil Cameron , ed. 2007 Chocolate in Mesoamerica: A Cultural History of Cacao . Gainesville : University Press of Florida . Norton Marcy 2008 Sacred Gifts, Profane Pleasures: A History of Tobacco and Chocolate in the Atlantic...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2022) 69 (4): 477–491.
Published: 01 October 2022
... wanted half of the traditional 5 percent of that amount or principal—that is, 120 pesos—to pay a teacher for students of San Gregorio, and the other 120 pesos to help defray the costs of wine, candles, and chocolate. 12 Thirty years later, Captain Juan de Chavarría bequeathed his hacienda of San José...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2004) 51 (1): 203–205.
Published: 01 January 2004
... being frequently very similar, on the whole they seem inextricably entwined into a shared symbolic complex, with such local touches as the use of opaque and gritty chocolate beverages to mask the presence of magical powders. Although investigators carefully docu- mented the ethnic or casta status...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2010) 57 (3): 389–414.
Published: 01 July 2010
... since the 1980s have followed Sidney W. Mintz’s commodity chain model, tracing food items such as salt, spices, chocolate, and coffee in the world system and the development of “modern” taste. Fewer studies have examined taste experience and social eating practices within specific colo- nial...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2019) 66 (4): 689–719.
Published: 01 October 2019
... the chocolate drink served during marriage negotiations and to mothers following childbirth) with the creator Itzamna. 19 The elderly counterpart of this figure is shown performing a bathing ceremony, stretching her warping frame, weaving, and in almanacs associated with the care of the stingless bees...
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Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2007) 54 (1): 187–194.
Published: 01 January 2007
... people. That Juan was reported as carrying out activities usually associated with women (preparing chocolate or doing the shopping) did not help his position. As Lewis reminds us, same-sex relationships may at times open an additional dimension, that of cross-dressing, and discrepancies between...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2003) 50 (3): 419–445.
Published: 01 July 2003
...’’ (in the state seal at center) in a context celebrating the English conquest of North America was apparently lost. An advertising postcard for Headley’s Chocolates the only kind sold at the Jamestown Expositionthe cur- sive text...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2021) 68 (1): 77–101.
Published: 01 January 2021
... and tanneries. By the 1540s these urban arrivistes were habituating to the smells of its markets and foods, coming to value the smells and tastes of tobacco, chiles, and chocolate. These native plants in turn served as foci for collective rituals that defined settler colonists as vecinos (vested city...
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Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2022) 69 (4): 493–509.
Published: 01 October 2022
... to serve students drinking chocolate, instead of atole, as well as other foods; and to provide them every week with clean and “appropriate clothing to their status,” which included a frock and a hat, so they resembled, to some degree, the way students at other schools dressed ( El Mosquito Mexicano 1834a...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2021) 68 (2): 291–310.
Published: 01 April 2021
... reales for prognostications. He only did them on Fridays and likely had the support of his enslaver, Jacinto da Silva, who would have profited from these readings. When pressed, Antón claimed he only wanted the money for chocolate, tobacco, and pulque. Before the inquisition, he cleverly called...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2020) 67 (3): 407–428.
Published: 01 July 2020
...: “And they will also give you the various kinds of feathers—cotinga, spoonbill, trogon; all the precious feathers; and multicolored chocolate and multicolored cotton” (1:73–81). Birds and feathers also figured prominently in the Mexica migration legend and their development of a distinct ethnic identity. Mexica...
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Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2020) 67 (1): 149–173.
Published: 01 January 2020
...-century chapels and the administrator’s material wealth, exemplified by personal possessions such as silver-footed goblets for drinking chocolate and furnishings made of exotic woods (Weaver 2015 : 377). The notion that the Jesuits lived in convents at the estates and were hoarding treasure was likely...
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Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2022) 69 (3): 287–311.
Published: 01 July 2022
... Press . Moorhead Max L. 1949 . “ Hernán Cortés and the Tehuantepec Passage .” Hispanic American Historical Review 29 , no. 3 : 370 – 79 . Norton Marcy . 2008 . Sacred Gifts, Profane Pleasures: A History of Tobacco and Chocolate in the Atlantic World . Ithaca, NY : Cornell...
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Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2018) 65 (1): 25–50.
Published: 01 January 2018
... , and Aliphat Mario . 2006 . “ The Itza Maya Control over Cacao: Politics, Commerce, and War in the Sixteenth and Seventeenth Centuries .” In Chocolate in Mesoamerica: A Cultural History of Cacao , edited by McNeil Cameron L. , 289 – 306 . Gainesville : University Press of Florida . Chance...
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