1-16 of 16 Search Results for

childbirth

Follow your search
Access your saved searches in your account

Would you like to receive an alert when new items match your search?
Close Modal
Sort by
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2019) 66 (4): 721–744.
Published: 01 October 2019
...Timothy W. Knowlton; Edber Dzidz Yam Abstract Pregnancy and childbirth were among indigenous Maya women’s most dangerous life experiences, with very high maternal and perinatal death rates from pre-Hispanic times through the first decades of the twentieth century. This article contributes to the...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2019) 66 (4): 689–719.
Published: 01 October 2019
...Gabrielle Vail Abstract This article focuses on female-gendered activities in Mesoamerican culture and reveals a strong link between conception, pregnancy, and childbirth on the one hand and weaving and other activities that produce cloth on the other. Supporting evidence from sources such as...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2009) 56 (4): 549–567.
Published: 01 October 2009
... specialized in prenatal care and childbirth. When Bichea was small, her father invited a visiting Sioux warrior to pierce her ears. This was a costly ritual: her father, Black Deer, gave his best riding 552 Loretta Fowler horse, a pack of buffalo...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2005) 52 (4): 673–687.
Published: 01 October 2005
... ceremonies, festivals, and warfare, and they also used it in sacrifices to deities.18 During menopause and childbirth, women drank chocolate to for- tify themselves, as did men and women suffering from magical sickness.19 Evidence suggests that women were responsible for chocolate prepa- ration in...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2017) 64 (4): 497–527.
Published: 01 October 2017
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2008) 55 (2): 229–250.
Published: 01 April 2008
... altar of the Cofradía San Juan, where it is still petitioned by midwives and healers seeking cures for sick children. The apron is said to have been worn long ago by a woman with the power to help other women in childbirth by facilitating an easy delivery. This notion that garments contain the...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2019) 66 (3): 489–513.
Published: 01 July 2019
... their first childbirth or people chosen by the god Tlalloc (Sahagún 2001 , 1: 295–300). For the friars, it was the most obvious choice and, on the surface, an easy substitution, mostly due to the skeletal imagery. However, the similarities end here. Hell was (and still is) conceived of as a punishment...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2021) 68 (3): 429–448.
Published: 01 July 2021
... childbirth, and men through hunting and warfare. Women’s gendered power was inherent, something that existed naturally. Men’s, in contrast, was performative—they had to go to war or hunt to achieve manhood and express their masculinity. In many ways colonialism could not impact women’s abilities to continue...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2005) 52 (4): 689–726.
Published: 01 October 2005
... tantamount to denying them the possibility of participating in the creative process. Furthermore, it resulted in an inversion of the social order. The women abandoned those activities that made them socially creative: childbirth, cultivation, and the process- ing of manioc. During this time, the women...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2012) 59 (3): 465–488.
Published: 01 July 2012
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2010) 57 (3): 415–444.
Published: 01 July 2010
..., comparing precontact societal and cultural understandings of women’s responsibilities and men’s duties, finds parallels between many gendered tasks and events. For example, a woman’s death in childbirth was equal to that of a man’s death on the battlefield. Susan Kellogg, studying how indigenous...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2006) 53 (3): 445–477.
Published: 01 July 2006
... often express a female point of view, stressing the obligation for women to observe strict rules pertaining to menstruation and childbirth. Peck worked on these data with painstaking precision, trying to make sense of them and reconstruct the Inuit pantheon. This was a difficult task, especially as...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2006) 53 (3): 543–566.
Published: 01 July 2006
.... Alcohol was also used in rites of passage. For example, in the seven- teenth century, French missionary Raymond Breton observed the funda- mental role of oüicou in childbirth in Dominica. According to Breton, When the women are giving birth, the husband withdraws from them, and they do not...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2004) 51 (3): 489–533.
Published: 01 July 2004
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2005) 52 (2): 371–406.
Published: 01 April 2005
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2000) 47 (1): 67–99.
Published: 01 January 2000