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childbirth

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Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2019) 66 (4): 721–744.
Published: 01 October 2019
...Timothy W. Knowlton; Edber Dzidz Yam Abstract Pregnancy and childbirth were among indigenous Maya women’s most dangerous life experiences, with very high maternal and perinatal death rates from pre-Hispanic times through the first decades of the twentieth century. This article contributes...
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Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2019) 66 (4): 689–719.
Published: 01 October 2019
...Gabrielle Vail Abstract This article focuses on female-gendered activities in Mesoamerican culture and reveals a strong link between conception, pregnancy, and childbirth on the one hand and weaving and other activities that produce cloth on the other. Supporting evidence from sources...
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Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2009) 56 (4): 549–567.
Published: 01 October 2009
... because federal agents worked to prevent polygyny. Bichea was the eldest daughter in a family of seven children. Her family was prosperous, and her mother, Spotted Woman, was a doctor. As a woman doctor, she specialized in prenatal care and childbirth. When Bichea was small...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2022) 69 (1): 101–108.
Published: 01 January 2022
... other from my mother’s preteen years. My mother’s father was my dad’s music teacher. So, he grew up studying music. At the age of eighteen, he married my mother. My mother died during childbirth at the age of thirty-five, I believe that was. My dad died at age eighty-five and was my greatest teacher...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2017) 64 (4): 497–527.
Published: 01 October 2017
... Of the same stone they had another idol, called the idol of the midwives (that was as Lucina, which the poets imagine as the Goddess of childbirth), to whom all the women dedicated great celebration & sacrifice, & she was invoked at childbirths. They had another idol, also of the same stone, which...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2005) 52 (4): 673–687.
Published: 01 October 2005
... ceremonies, festivals, and warfare, and they also used it in sacrifices to deities.18 During menopause and childbirth, women drank chocolate to for- tify themselves, as did men and women suffering from magical sickness.19 Evidence suggests that women were responsible for chocolate prepa- ration...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2008) 55 (2): 229–250.
Published: 01 April 2008
... on the altar of the Cofradía San Juan, where it is still petitioned by midwives and healers seeking cures for sick children. The apron is said to have been worn long ago by a woman with the power to help other women in childbirth by facilitating an easy delivery. This notion that garments contain...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2021) 68 (3): 429–448.
Published: 01 July 2021
... as examples, Cherokee men and women performed specific gender roles in their communities from which they obtained and demonstrated their spiritual power. Both relied on the shedding of blood: women through menstruation and childbirth, and men through hunting and warfare. Women’s gendered power was inherent...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2005) 52 (4): 689–726.
Published: 01 October 2005
... in an inversion of the social order. The women abandoned those activities that made them socially creative: childbirth, cultivation, and the process- ing of manioc. During this time, the women celebrated the Yurupari rituals To What Extent Were Amazon Women Facts of Native Americans? 705 away from...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2019) 66 (3): 489–513.
Published: 01 July 2019
... childbirth or people chosen by the god Tlalloc (Sahagún 2001 , 1: 295–300). For the friars, it was the most obvious choice and, on the surface, an easy substitution, mostly due to the skeletal imagery. However, the similarities end here. Hell was (and still is) conceived of as a punishment, a place where...
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Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2022) 69 (1): 29–52.
Published: 01 January 2022
... and prepared their hunting expeditions before heading out in search of bison. 30 ChWeUm remarried two seasons after losing his first spouse, Euphrosine Hamelin, who passed away during childbirth. 31 Figure 3. ChWeUm Davis and Sarah Nolin, c. 1924. Bateson 1925 . Marsii to the St. Ann Mission...
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Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2024) 71 (1): 63–86.
Published: 01 January 2024
... in designated huts during menstruation, structures that doubled in use for childbirth (Hudson 1976 : 320–22; Galloway 1998b : 204; Pesantubbee 2005 : 24). Health culture shaped everyday life. When illness appeared, entire communities took steps to preserve haknip achukma . Each Choctaw town had at least...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2006) 53 (3): 543–566.
Published: 01 July 2006
... in childbirth in Dominica. According to Breton, When the women are giving birth, the husband withdraws from them, and they do not sleep together at all for five or six months from this point. And both undertake a fast, which is one of the most celebrated, especially when they have a boy...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2012) 59 (3): 465–488.
Published: 01 July 2012
... in seventeenth- century New England Congrega- tionalism that women were typically the ones who initiated church adherence, membership, and baptisms, primarily at particular moments of transition within the family, like childbirth and marriages. See Anne S. Brown and David D. Hall, “Family...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2010) 57 (3): 415–444.
Published: 01 July 2010
... societal and cultural understandings of women’s responsibilities and men’s duties, finds parallels between many gendered tasks and events. For example, a woman’s death in childbirth was equal to that of a man’s death on the battlefield. Susan Kellogg, studying how indigenous women adjusted...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2006) 53 (3): 445–477.
Published: 01 July 2006
... who attended his services. In his ethnographic accounts we find many detailed verbatim accounts of shamanic beliefs and practices. They often express a female point of view, stressing the obligation for women to observe strict rules pertaining to menstruation and childbirth. Peck worked...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2000) 47 (1): 67–99.
Published: 01 January 2000
... and the inward movement described as a reunion: ‘‘the resurrec- tion of the dead fantasized as childbirth’’ and ‘‘the return of the living to the earth-womb In Inanwatan primarily this second aspect of the inward movement is stressed...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2005) 52 (2): 371–406.
Published: 01 April 2005
... resided. Late-nineteenth- and early-twentieth-century medical writers were both intrigued and appalled by what they perceived as the natural pro- clivities of aboriginal women toward free sexuality and easy childbirth (Holder 1892: 755; Neave 1896: 21; O’Neil 1930: 247). As Jean Barman writes...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2004) 51 (3): 489–533.
Published: 01 July 2004
... that female berdaches were not gender mixed but were transgendered social men whose sexual acts were recognized as ‘‘female homosexuality 36 Some Native American examples include the Lakota winkete, who had aus- picious powers in relation to childbirth and child rearing (Powers 1977...