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Published: 01 April 2019
Figure 9. Chapter 8 concerns archery games for young boys. Drawing by Douglas Thomas, annotations by Alex Thomas, 1916. Courtesy of the American Philosophical Society, Mss.497.3. B63.c. Figure 9. Chapter 8 concerns archery games for young boys. Drawing by Douglas Thomas, annotations by Alex More
Image
Published: 01 April 2019
Figure 10. Chapter 9 shows different topati used by Pic’aktlim for his son’s thluuch-ha . Drawing by Douglas Thomas, annotations by Alex Thomas, 1916. Courtesy of the American Philosophical Society, Mss.497.3. B63.c. Figure 10. Chapter 9 shows different topati used by Pic’aktlim for his More
Image
Published: 01 April 2019
Figure 7. Chapter 6 depicts different games played by young boys to increase courage and bravery. Drawing by Douglas Thomas, annotations by Alex Thomas, 1916. Courtesy of the American Philosophical Society, Mss.497.3. B63.c Figure 7. Chapter 6 depicts different games played by young boys to More
Image
Published: 01 April 2019
Figure 4. Chapter 3 depicts the thluuch-ha party for Harry Thomas. Drawing by Douglas Thomas, annotations by Alex Thomas, 1916. Courtesy of the American Philosophical Society, Mss.497.3. B63.c. Figure 4. Chapter 3 depicts the thluuch-ha party for Harry Thomas. Drawing by Douglas Thomas More
Image
Published: 01 April 2019
Figure 2. Chapter 1 featuring topati owned by Tom Sayach’apis, which he might have used in a thluuch-ha (proposal ceremony). Drawing by Douglas Thomas, annotation by Alex Thomas, 1916. Courtesy of the American Philosophical Society, Mss.497.3. B63.c. Figure 2. Chapter 1 featuring topati More
Image
Published: 01 April 2019
Figure 5. Chapter 4 features topati used to test Harry Thomas, Douglas’s younger brother, when he and the family went to Ki-kwis in Barkley Sound to thluuch-ha for a wife for Harry. Drawing by Douglas Thomas, annotations by Alex Thomas, 1916. Courtesy of the American Philosophical Society More
Image
Published: 01 April 2019
Figure 8. Chapter 7 depicts Douglas’s tl’ukwaana (wolf) ritual and initiation. Drawing by Douglas Thomas, annotations by Alex Thomas, 1916. Courtesy of the American Philosophical Society, Mss.497.3. B63.c. Figure 8. Chapter 7 depicts Douglas’s tl’ukwaana (wolf) ritual and initiation. Drawing More
Image
Published: 01 April 2019
Figure 13. Chapter 12 depicts a potlatch held to honor Douglas when he was a child. Drawing by Douglas Thomas, annotations by Alex Thomas, 1916. Courtesy of the American Philosophical Society, Mss.497.3. B63.c. Figure 13. Chapter 12 depicts a potlatch held to honor Douglas when he was a child More
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Published: 01 April 2019
Figure 6. Chapter 5 depicts Alex Thomas’s thluuch-ha and marriage. Drawing by Douglas Thomas, annotations by Alex Thomas, 1916. Courtesy of the American Philosophical Society, Mss.497.3. B63.c. Figure 6. Chapter 5 depicts Alex Thomas’s thluuch-ha and marriage. Drawing by Douglas Thomas More
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Published: 01 April 2019
Figure 12. Chapter 11 depicts the hitcapas (puberty) ceremony for Douglas’s younger sister, Bella Thomas. Drawing by Douglas Thomas, annotations by Alex Thomas, 1916. American Philosophical Society, Mss.497.3. B63.c Figure 12. Chapter 11 depicts the hitcapas (puberty) ceremony for Douglas’s More
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Published: 01 April 2019
Figure 3. Chapter 2 with ma-as (big house) owned by Tom Sayach’apis, replete with evidence of his wealth. Drawing by Douglas Thomas, annotations by Alex Thomas, 1916. Courtesy of American Philosophical Society, Mss.497.3. B63.c. Figure 3. Chapter 2 with ma-as (big house) owned by Tom More
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Published: 01 April 2019
Figure 11. Chapter 10 shows the waxniqi’nak dance. Drawing by Douglas Thomas, annotations by Alex Thomas, 1916. Courtesy of the American Philosophical Society, Mss.497.3. B63.c. Figure 11. Chapter 10 shows the waxniqi’nak dance. Drawing by Douglas Thomas, annotations by Alex Thomas, 1916 More
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2020) 67 (3): 525–526.
Published: 01 July 2020
... Society for Ethnohistory 2020 In this sweeping account of Native American history in the Southern United States, Gregory D. Smithers lets “Native Southerners drive the story through their words and deeds” (11). Each chapter of Smithers’s book presents an overview of a specific era and details...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2016) 63 (2): 415–416.
Published: 01 April 2016
... overview of the field for comparative purposes. The text is divided into four thematic parts. As with many anthologies that attempt to find common threads to pull the disparate chapters together, the themes are not overly intuitive. Part 1, “Intersections and Trajectories,” features three chapters that...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2017) 64 (4): 557–558.
Published: 01 October 2017
... kilometers from melting glaciers to lowland tropical rainforest. Organized into ten chapters, Gade’s book emphasizes the important role of environment and biology in history and culture. Specifically, Gade offers a diachronic approach to place, theoretically informed by cultural biogeography and historical...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2021) 68 (2): 358–360.
Published: 01 April 2021
... manuscript studies and a compelling read for specialists and a more general audience alike. It is particularly notable for the focus on the materiality of the manuscripts, the artist and intended audience, and the social and political machinations that prompted their creation. The final body chapter...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2016) 63 (4): 743–744.
Published: 01 October 2016
...–10). Over eight chapters Morrissey shows that the local community in Illinois forged a distinctive economy, politics, and culture of incorporation that was no less imperial despite its local origins. The book proceeds chronologically, and the opening chapters foreground indigenous history...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2019) 66 (2): 391–392.
Published: 01 April 2019
... the line between the two. The first two chapters explain Christie’s family history and use the records of the Cherokee Nation to show how his experiences growing up in post–Civil War Indian Territory shaped his perception of federal authority. Chapter 3 reconstructs the events that led to the...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2020) 67 (1): 187–188.
Published: 01 January 2020
... three chapters establish why the mestizo population occupies the unmarked category in Latin America, from historical and anthropological perspectives. Wade’s ability to weave vast amounts of scholarly work, ranging from eugenics to contemporary genomics, into a straightforward and coherent narrative is...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2016) 63 (1): 193–194.
Published: 01 January 2016
... also easily approachable as a base- line for understanding race and ethnicity in Latin America from an STS perspective. Chapter 1 offers a comprehensive account of the history of research into human biological diversity in Brazil. It explains the relation- ship between physical anthropology and...