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Published: 01 April 2019
Figure 2. Chapter 1 featuring topati owned by Tom Sayach’apis, which he might have used in a thluuch-ha (proposal ceremony). Drawing by Douglas Thomas, annotation by Alex Thomas, 1916. Courtesy of the American Philosophical Society, Mss.497.3. B63.c. Figure 2. Chapter 1 featuring topati More
Image
Published: 01 April 2019
Figure 3. Chapter 2 with ma-as (big house) owned by Tom Sayach’apis, replete with evidence of his wealth. Drawing by Douglas Thomas, annotations by Alex Thomas, 1916. Courtesy of American Philosophical Society, Mss.497.3. B63.c. Figure 3. Chapter 2 with ma-as (big house) owned by Tom More
Image
Published: 01 April 2019
Figure 4. Chapter 3 depicts the thluuch-ha party for Harry Thomas. Drawing by Douglas Thomas, annotations by Alex Thomas, 1916. Courtesy of the American Philosophical Society, Mss.497.3. B63.c. Figure 4. Chapter 3 depicts the thluuch-ha party for Harry Thomas. Drawing by Douglas Thomas More
Image
Published: 01 April 2019
Figure 5. Chapter 4 features topati used to test Harry Thomas, Douglas’s younger brother, when he and the family went to Ki-kwis in Barkley Sound to thluuch-ha for a wife for Harry. Drawing by Douglas Thomas, annotations by Alex Thomas, 1916. Courtesy of the American Philosophical Society More
Image
Published: 01 April 2019
Figure 6. Chapter 5 depicts Alex Thomas’s thluuch-ha and marriage. Drawing by Douglas Thomas, annotations by Alex Thomas, 1916. Courtesy of the American Philosophical Society, Mss.497.3. B63.c. Figure 6. Chapter 5 depicts Alex Thomas’s thluuch-ha and marriage. Drawing by Douglas Thomas More
Image
Published: 01 April 2019
Figure 7. Chapter 6 depicts different games played by young boys to increase courage and bravery. Drawing by Douglas Thomas, annotations by Alex Thomas, 1916. Courtesy of the American Philosophical Society, Mss.497.3. B63.c Figure 7. Chapter 6 depicts different games played by young boys to More
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Published: 01 April 2019
Figure 8. Chapter 7 depicts Douglas’s tl’ukwaana (wolf) ritual and initiation. Drawing by Douglas Thomas, annotations by Alex Thomas, 1916. Courtesy of the American Philosophical Society, Mss.497.3. B63.c. Figure 8. Chapter 7 depicts Douglas’s tl’ukwaana (wolf) ritual and initiation. Drawing More
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Published: 01 April 2019
Figure 9. Chapter 8 concerns archery games for young boys. Drawing by Douglas Thomas, annotations by Alex Thomas, 1916. Courtesy of the American Philosophical Society, Mss.497.3. B63.c. Figure 9. Chapter 8 concerns archery games for young boys. Drawing by Douglas Thomas, annotations by Alex More
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Published: 01 April 2019
Figure 10. Chapter 9 shows different topati used by Pic’aktlim for his son’s thluuch-ha . Drawing by Douglas Thomas, annotations by Alex Thomas, 1916. Courtesy of the American Philosophical Society, Mss.497.3. B63.c. Figure 10. Chapter 9 shows different topati used by Pic’aktlim for his More
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Published: 01 April 2019
Figure 11. Chapter 10 shows the waxniqi’nak dance. Drawing by Douglas Thomas, annotations by Alex Thomas, 1916. Courtesy of the American Philosophical Society, Mss.497.3. B63.c. Figure 11. Chapter 10 shows the waxniqi’nak dance. Drawing by Douglas Thomas, annotations by Alex Thomas, 1916 More
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Published: 01 April 2019
Figure 12. Chapter 11 depicts the hitcapas (puberty) ceremony for Douglas’s younger sister, Bella Thomas. Drawing by Douglas Thomas, annotations by Alex Thomas, 1916. American Philosophical Society, Mss.497.3. B63.c Figure 12. Chapter 11 depicts the hitcapas (puberty) ceremony for Douglas’s More
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Published: 01 April 2019
Figure 13. Chapter 12 depicts a potlatch held to honor Douglas when he was a child. Drawing by Douglas Thomas, annotations by Alex Thomas, 1916. Courtesy of the American Philosophical Society, Mss.497.3. B63.c. Figure 13. Chapter 12 depicts a potlatch held to honor Douglas when he was a child More
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (1 April 2016) 63 (2): 415–416.
Published: 01 April 2016
... North Americans and will provide essential comparative content for genocide scholars across the globe. The text is divided into four thematic parts. As with many anthologies that attempt to find common threads to pull the disparate chapters together, the themes are not overly intuitive. Part 1...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (1 October 2017) 64 (4): 557–558.
Published: 01 October 2017
... Urubamba River spans an altitudinal gradient of over 4,000 meters, flowing 650 kilometers from melting glaciers to lowland tropical rainforest. Organized into ten chapters, Gade’s book emphasizes the important role of environment and biology in history and culture. Specifically, Gade offers a diachronic...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (1 April 2019) 66 (2): 391–392.
Published: 01 April 2019
... careful sourcing, writing in an accessible style that should appeal to nonprofessional readers. Her experience writing both fiction and nonfiction is especially helpful as she parses out where other authors have unwisely crossed the line between the two. The first two chapters explain Christie’s...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (1 October 2016) 63 (4): 743–744.
Published: 01 October 2016
...–10). Over eight chapters Morrissey shows that the local community in Illinois forged a distinctive economy, politics, and culture of incorporation that was no less imperial despite its local origins. The book proceeds chronologically, and the opening chapters foreground indigenous history...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (1 January 2016) 63 (1): 193–194.
Published: 01 January 2016
... of laboratory case studies. The first half is of particular interest to historians of science and is also easily approachable as a base- line for understanding race and ethnicity in Latin America from an STS perspective. Chapter 1 offers a comprehensive account of the history of research into...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (1 January 2015) 62 (1): 171–172.
Published: 01 January 2015
... alphabetic texts. The editors loosely organize the work’s thirteen chapters according to the sources primarily examined, although there is much overlap. In the first chapter, Daniel Graña-Behrens­ exam- ines the inscriptions and iconography of the Classic Maya and various colo- nial sources to...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (1 October 2016) 63 (4): 735–736.
Published: 01 October 2016
... excavations at Coweeta Creek, a site that offers unique value to the diachronic study of Cherokee spatial and social organization because it spans the precontact and contact periods, has been extensively excavated, and represents the characteristics of other Cherokee sites in the region. Most chapters begin...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (1 January 2016) 63 (1): 197–198.
Published: 01 January 2016
... of the charm of Newman’s account of hacienda life in revolutionary-era Mexico. Newman’s opening chapter sets the stage for the revolution, which allows readers to familiarize themselves with the political, social, and economic circumstances in which debt peons lived. The resident-subjects of...