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camel

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Journal Article
Ethnohistory (1 January 2006) 53 (1): 173–193.
Published: 01 January 2006
...Aneesa Kassam The “ethnic” origins of the Gabra camel pastoralists who live on the Kenyan-Ethiopian border and their relationship to the territorially adjacent Borana cattle pastoralists are matters of ongoing academic debate. This article, which is based on Gabra clan traditions, suggests that the...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (1 April 2008) 55 (2): 321–330.
Published: 01 April 2008
... Southern Ethiopia. Master's thesis, Addis Ababa University. Haberland, Eike 1963 Galla Südäthiopiens . Stuttgart: Kohlhammer. Helander, Bernhard 2003 The Slaughtered Camel: Coping with Fictitious Descent among the Hubeer of Southern Somalia . Uppsala: Uppsala University Library. Kassam...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (1 January 2004) 51 (1): 201–202.
Published: 01 January 2004
... documenting the trajectory of anthro- pology and archaeology as they have developed into the modern era. Pez- zati, archivist for the museum, highlights that sense of disciplinary his- tory as a journey through his choice of plates; the front cover depicts a camel caravan trekking toward the camera, and...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (1 October 2006) 53 (4): 633–655.
Published: 01 October 2006
..., experiences, and agendas construct additional layers of cultural memory in performances of guitar music. The Tuareg and the Ichumar Ethnographic and Historical Background on the Tuareg The Tuareg (also called Kel Tamajaq) are today predominantly semino- madic, combining the herding of camels, sheep...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (1 January 2006) 53 (1): 3–11.
Published: 01 January 2006
... in the region and beyond it. She also suggests that the five Gabra phratries were formed historically on the basis of their specialized camel economy. Hence, the Gabra can be seen as forming a cultural and economic bridge between the Borana cattle- and the Somali camel-herding societies. Kassam...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (1 January 2006) 53 (1): 195–219.
Published: 01 January 2006
... pleased, since no one had visited the island since the time of Sepenya, who had been swept away to the island in a camel trough and had never returned. How was it possible that Fuchs not only had traveled to the island but also had returned with remarkable things?15 The next day, 29 July, as...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (1 January 2006) 53 (1): 121–141.
Published: 01 January 2006
... on their arrival at Losidok on the lakeshore. Later on, Lokeriyo is said to have organized the Ngturkana’s acquisition of the camel from the Rendille, who lived on the eastern side of the lake. He is said to have parted the waters of the lake, in the fashion of the biblical Moses, for the...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (1 January 2006) 53 (1): 71–93.
Published: 01 January 2006
... drums of water and diesel) was transformed into a floating morass, and our well was inundated with camel dung swept in by the flooding river. My field notes for 2 November1965 remark: ‘‘Brief but violent rainstorm flooding camp. Six inches of water sweep through the tent and 25 yards behind tent a...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (1 January 2006) 53 (1): 95–119.
Published: 01 January 2006
... scrub interspersed with arid grasslands and rich pastures on the hillsides that provide excellent grazing for Turkana cattle, camels, sheep, and goats. Woodlands and thick tall grass are found on the upper slopes and along the banks of water- courses. Confined by the western rift and Lake Turkana at...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (1 January 2006) 53 (1): 143–172.
Published: 01 January 2006
... scale. His column, which was attacked after purchasing goats from a section of the Turkana, had one man and two oxen stabbed to death and a camel stolen. The troops killed five or six tribesmen. Despite their problems Macdonald and Martyr each hoped that con- trol would be extended across their...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (1 April 2004) 51 (2): 223–256.
Published: 01 April 2004
...-like plants. The Turkana plains around the upper Tarash River support mainly goats as well as cattle and a large number of camels. After the rains, sparse lines of grass appear and a myriad of wild fruits flourish, attracting large numbers of Turkana women. The upper Tarash River area is...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (1 October 2005) 52 (4): 727–787.
Published: 01 October 2005
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (1 January 2006) 53 (1): 35–69.
Published: 01 January 2006