1-20 of 287 Search Results for

cacique

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Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2010) 57 (3): 445–466.
Published: 01 July 2010
... the significance of these trends for the changing status of cacique in the eighteenth century. American Society for Ethnohistory 2010 Acuña, René, ed. 1984 Relaciones geográficas del siglo XVI: Antequera . Vol. 1 . Mexico City: UNAM. Chance, John K. 1994 Indian Elites in Late Colonial...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2009) 56 (1): 91–123.
Published: 01 January 2009
...John K. Chance Marriage alliances among governing families were an important instrument of political integration in Postclassic Mesoamerica, especially in Mixteca. Alliances among Mixtec nobles persisted during the colonial period, although after the sixteenth century, the caciques lost much...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2014) 61 (4): 739–759.
Published: 01 October 2014
...Rajeshwari Dutt In this article I delve into the life story of one particular cacique (indigenous leader), Angelino Uicab of the town of Teya, during a particularly significant period in the history of Yucatán: the Caste War. Focusing on the 1840s and 1850s I use the Uicab case to show how...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2003) 50 (1): 131–150.
Published: 01 January 2003
...-century struggles over land tenure, jurisdictional boundaries, issues of sovereignty, and group definitions—even when the cacique was no longer present and the cacique's estate was no longer extant. American Society for Ethnohistory 2003 Alvarado, Francisco de 1962 [1593] Vocabulario en lengua...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2008) 55 (4): 553–578.
Published: 01 October 2008
... represented himself as an authority on the Maya and as a model outcome of indigenista assimilation. Part revolutionary cacique (or boss), part ethnic broker, he used his mastery of Yucatec Maya and populist style to parry demands from below and to accommodate the new political and old economic elites. Still...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2003) 50 (1): 69–88.
Published: 01 January 2003
... in the valley remained the cacique of Teotihuacán. While much extant literature contrasts the hacienda as a type with the estates of the native aristocracy, we suggest a functional similarity based on comparability of market articulation (including commodities produced and the land itself as commodity...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2019) 66 (1): 117–139.
Published: 01 January 2019
...Jesse Zarley Abstract This article examines the actions of Francisco Mariluán and Venancio Coñuepan, two rival caciques of the Mapuche indigenous people, during Chile’s independence wars to understand how indigenous leaders defended their sovereignty and shaped the transition from colony to nation...
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Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2013) 60 (2): 195–217.
Published: 01 April 2013
...Erin Woodruff Stone On Christmas Day 1521, in the Spanish colony of Santo Domingo, the first recorded slave revolt in the Americas occurred. A group of African, likely Wolof, slaves came together with native Indians led by the Taíno cacique Enriquillo to assert their independence. Beyond being...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2022) 69 (4): 401–427.
Published: 01 October 2022
... intervention in the psyche of the Native children of the Andean kurakas. Indoctrinators used the schools of caciques and other missional spaces to direct these young students’ mental and bodily dispositions toward cultural comportment changes. Colonizing Andeans’ innermost realms, the king and the Jesuits...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2021) 68 (3): 363–383.
Published: 01 July 2021
...Erin W. Stone Abstract This article delves into the conquest and early years of colonization of Española from the perspective of the “structure of the conjuncture.” By doing so it prioritizes the Indigenous perspective of conquest, particularly that of the cacique Guacanagarí, who formed the first...
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Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2018) 65 (3): 465–488.
Published: 01 July 2018
... settlers. Copyright 2018 by American Society for Ethnohistory 2018 Muiscas New Kingdom of Granada miracle Chiquinquirá caciques On 3 December 1587, a mixed group of Catholic priests, Spanish city–dwellers, and indigenous devotees began a seventy-six-kilometer journey eastward from...
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Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2003) 50 (1): 15–45.
Published: 01 January 2003
... Mesoamerica.In Caciques and Their People: A Volume in Honor of Ronald Spores . Joyce Marcus and Judith Francis Zeitlin, eds. Pp. 45 -65. Anthropological Papers, No. 89. Ann Arbor:University of Michigan, Museum of Anthropology. 1996a The Barrios of Colonial Tecali: Patronage,Kinship, and Territorial...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2017) 64 (4): 549–550.
Published: 01 October 2017
... to understand, rather, the multidirectional processes of identity formation—Spanish, indigenous, mestizo—in Mexico. In the author’s words, the book “is not a story of one-way memory transmission, but rather of resonance, dialogues, intersections and parallels. The cacique agenda of self-fashioning developed...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2008) 55 (1): 119–152.
Published: 01 January 2008
... for Ethnohistory 120 Sergio Serulnikov land assigned to the households on a long-term basis. As regards the latter, the caciques periodically redistributed plots according to a combination of criteria: demographic (size of the families), social (sponsorship...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2017) 64 (1): 150–151.
Published: 01 January 2017
... leaders ( caciques ), the encomenderos who were granted access to tribute in the valley, and the colonial church and state. To achieve this, he focuses upon the colonial reorganization of geographic spaces and landscapes, the evolution of a colonial economy in the valley and its eventual integration...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2016) 63 (4): 697–720.
Published: 01 October 2016
... bringing the chaotic colony into the king’s peace. In practice, this meant checking the worst excesses of the encomenderos while pragmatically balancing the economic and political interests of the king, the clergy, and, to a degree, the Nahua hereditary nobility, whom they called caciques and “natural...
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Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2001) 48 (3): 403–432.
Published: 01 July 2001
... of that time. Strong colonial cacicazgos were Santiago Quiotepec, San Juan Bautista Cuicatlán, and San Francisco Tutepetongo— all situated on the slopes overlooking the Cañada of Cuicatlan. The posses- sion of large extensions of land on the valley floor and on the slopes formed the basis for the cacique’s...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2023) 70 (1): 65–93.
Published: 01 January 2023
... Nova Coimbra in the Paraguay River valley, the Portuguese had been trying to secure alliances with Guaicuru groups by offering gifts such as military uniforms, staffs, and firearms (Prado [1795] 1839 : 40–41). 1 During the 1791 negotiations, the caciques first used their captives as ambassadors...
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Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2002) 49 (2): 281–317.
Published: 01 April 2002
... in 12 return for the cessation of the attacks against the Spanish. A group of Tule caciques responded favorably to Martínez’s offer of amnesty in the fall of 1738, the result, the presidente triumphantly opined...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2020) 67 (2): 269–287.
Published: 01 April 2020
... .” In Caciques and Their People: A Volume in Honor of Ronald Spores ,” edited by Marcus Joyce and Zeitlin Judith Francis , 45 – 65 . Ann Arbor : University of Michigan . Chance John K. 1996 . “ The Caciques of Tecali: Class and Ethnic Identity in Late Colonial Mexico .” Hispanic...