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anishinaabe

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Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2010) 57 (1): 11–33.
Published: 01 January 2010
...Heidi Bohaker Anishinaabe peoples of the Great Lakes region consistently signed treaties, petitions, and other paper documents from the seventeenth through the nineteenth centuries with pictographic representations of their nindoodem (clan) identities. Close study of these pictographs reveals...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2023) 70 (1): 123–124.
Published: 01 January 2023
...Ian Tonat ietonat@email.wm.edu Doodem and Council Fire: Anishinaabe Governance through Alliance . By Heidi Bohaker . ( Toronto : University of Toronto Press , 2020 . 304 pp., 37 black-and-white illustrations, 6.00 × 9.00. $34.95 paperback.) Copyright 2023 by American...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2022) 69 (1): 1–27.
Published: 01 January 2022
...Scott Berthelette Abstract La Colle was an influential Anishinaabe ogimaa (leader) and mayosewinini (war chief) who led the Monsoni (moose) doodem (clan) in the Rainy Lake region during the 1730s and 1740s. A biographical study of La Colle not only restores an individual Indigenous voice...
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Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2021) 68 (3): 449–451.
Published: 01 July 2021
... by American Society for Ethnohistory 2021 In Who Controls the Hunt? First Nations, Treaty Rights, and Conservation in Ontario, 1783–1939 , David Calverley examines Anishinaabe hunting rights and the impact of Ontario’s wildlife conservation laws on these rights in northern Ontario. The Anishinaabeg...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2021) 68 (2): 215–236.
Published: 01 April 2021
..., waters, and manoomin (wild rice) beds of Anishinaabewaki, the Lac Courte Oreilles Ojibweg kept their treaties and their sovereignty alive. Copyright 2021 by American Society for Ethnohistory 2021 Anishinaabe Ojibwe treaties treaty rights sovereignty In early spring 1974, when the ice...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2009) 56 (1): 35–67.
Published: 01 January 2009
... context. It considers the blockade not as a manifestation of inherent indigenous environmentality but as a complex phenomenon predicated on Anishinaabe people's desires for self-determination, recognition of rights, and the power to decide what takes place on land they perceive as theirs. More broadly...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2023) 70 (3): 231–258.
Published: 01 July 2023
...Laura J. Murray Abstract The 1783 “Crawford Purchase” of Michi Saagiig (Mississauga) Anishinaabe lands at the northeast end of Lake Ontario is generally recognized as the first treaty in Upper Canada for purposes of settlement. Lacking deed, map, or signed treaty, it fails to meet the Crown’s own...
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Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2023) 70 (1): 25–44.
Published: 01 January 2023
... in the Eastern Great Lakes Region, 1600–1701 .” William and Mary Quarterly 63 , no. 1 : 23–52. Bohaker Heidi . 2020 . Doodem and Council Fire: Anishinaabe Governance through Alliance . Toronto : University of Toronto Press . Bowes John P. 2008 . “ The Gnadenhutten Effect: Moravian...
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Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2019) 66 (1): 209–210.
Published: 01 January 2019
..., glossary, map, references, index. $50.00 hardcover.) Copyright 2019 by American Society for Ethnohistory 2019 During the summers of 1938 and 1940, Anishinaabe elder Adam (Samuel) Bigmouth (Sturgeon Clan) shared his insights into Ojibwe life in the Upper Berens River region with anthropologist...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2022) 69 (2): 223–232.
Published: 01 April 2022
... of work. The inspiration to dedicate my research to the study of an Indigenous language came from Fred Wheatley, an Anishinaabe elder. He ‘lost his tongue’ through his experience in residential schools but regained it from his grandmother. He then dedicated his life to passing on that teaching to others...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2022) 69 (1): 29–52.
Published: 01 January 2022
... and judiciousness to support their communities. The first is the 1851 Battle of Grand Coteau between the Yanktonais Sioux and a Métis and Anishinaabe bison-hunting party. The second is a Métis trading family negotiating with Lakota in the late 1870s through the actions of Sarah Nolin. In this article, we survey key...
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Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2018) 65 (1): 75–99.
Published: 01 January 2018
... are present. In the context of Réaume’s post, itself part of an exploratory endeavor, it is likely that most traders who engaged in hunting expeditions did so accompanied by Anishinaabe hunting parties or an Indigenous male hunter. Determining whether the occupants of Réaume’s Leaf River Post...
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Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2014) 61 (3): 580–582.
Published: 01 July 2014
..., and reli- gious network of Anishinaabe peoples connected through their struggles for land rights and autonomy after the War of 1812—a period of rapid change as disease, alcohol, government policies, and settler encroachment disrupted Ojibwe communities. Smith argues that the social upheaval...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2014) 61 (1): 79–98.
Published: 01 January 2014
... the relationship between Indians and African Methodists. John Hall and His Kinship Language Hall was born into an Ojibwe (Chippewa) community, probably in Michi- gan, around 1830. The Ojibwe are Algonquin-­speaking Anishinaabe people like the Potawatomis, the Ottawas, and the Algonquins. They resided...
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Published: 01 July 2023
Figure 4. Map of Michi Saagiig Spaces of the Bay of Quinte, by Francine Berish. Sources: DMTI CanMap Major and Minor Water Regions (2014); Anishinaabe place-names courtesy of Alan Ojiig Corbiere. More
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2020) 67 (1): 177–178.
Published: 01 January 2020
... indifference. The essayists’ major common claim is that Indigenous people were not simply acted upon by the empire and its agents. Instead, groups ranging from the Anishinaabe Odawa in the North American Great Lakes to the Fante in West Africa established pathways through which British imperialism developed...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2022) 69 (3): 358–359.
Published: 01 July 2022
... of good and ill will) that assimilation was the natural and desirable course. In the 1840s even some Anishinaabe leaders agreed, offering treaty money to help establish industrial schools, hoping that educated graduates would eventually run them. But Indigenous voices in this book mostly resisted, notably...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2014) 61 (3): 582–583.
Published: 01 July 2014
....) Copyright 2014 by American Society for Ethnohistory 2014 582 Book Reviews printed materials, Smith invites more work in both English and Anishinaa- bemowin (Ojibwe). His work demands that ethnohistorians grapple with the ambiguities of Anishinaabe...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2015) 62 (1): 190–191.
Published: 01 January 2015
... of these prior terms manageable. He pro- vides lengthy and informed explications of each of these major themes, drawing upon critics such as Mikhail Bakhtin, Arnold Krupat, James Clif- ford, and Anishinaabe poet, novelist, and critic Gerald Vizenor to solidify his cosmopolitan leanings. Moore deftly aligns...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2014) 61 (3): 578–580.
Published: 01 July 2014
... were linked to Jones through kinship or Methodism. This book, however, is more than a sequel. Donald B. Smith illuminates a political, social, and reli- gious network of Anishinaabe peoples connected through their struggles for land rights and autonomy after the War of 1812—a period of rapid...