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Wyandot

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Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2022) 69 (1): 123–124.
Published: 01 January 2022
...Mckelvey Kelly Part 2 shows Steckley’s English dictionary translations of words and phrases of the original narratives in Wyandot. Equally as important as the narratives themselves, this dictionary breaks down difficult phrases of the Wyandot language in accessible ways so that individuals can...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2001) 48 (3): 433–472.
Published: 01 July 2001
...Andrew Nurse This essay examines Marius Barbeau's early-twentieth-century Huron-Wyandot ethnography as a case study in the history of Canadian anthropology and in Canadian cultural history. It examines how Barbeau's ethnographic research became part of a broader, inherently political process...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2022) 69 (2): 223–232.
Published: 01 April 2022
...John Steckley Context This text was written in Wendat by Belgian Jesuit Father Philippe Pierson (1642–1688), who came to North America in 1666. From 1673 to 1683, he lived and worked with the Wyandot community in what is now the city of St. Ignace near the tip of the Upper Peninsula, Michigan...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2023) 70 (2): 219–221.
Published: 01 April 2023
..., and legacy. Daughters of Aataentsic: Life Stories from Seven Generations is the culmination of a near decade-long collaboration between the We n dat/Wa n dat Women’s Advisory Council and University of Saskatchewan historian Kathryn Magee Labelle, who is an adopted member of the Wyandot Nations of Anderdon...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2017) 64 (2): 191–215.
Published: 01 April 2017
..., CO : Fulcrum . Shriver Phillip R. 1988 “ Artifacts of Peace .” Timeline 5 : 43 – 45 . Simcoe John Graves 1925 “ His Excellency Lieutenant Governor Simcoe’s Reply to the Indian Nations Assembled at the Wyandot Village on the 13th Day of October, 1794...
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Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2017) 64 (2): 167–189.
Published: 01 April 2017
...-aandc.gc.ca/eng/1100100014597/1100100014637 (accessed 5 December 2016 ). Sioui Éléonore 1985 Andatha . Val-d’Or, QC : Éditions Hyperborée . Sioui Éléonore 1988 “ A Huron-Wyandot Woman’s Life Story: The Realization of an Impossible Dream .” PhD thesis, Union for Experimenting...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2023) 70 (1): 25–44.
Published: 01 January 2023
...—an annike-ogimaa or ogimaa—or an individual or group, often unnamed and unknown. Robbery and theft did not occur, but threats of violence filtered into the community. This treatment did not approach the severity of Wyandot confiscation of goods and clothing in 1781, but warnings nonetheless worked to create...
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Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2016) 63 (1): 143–166.
Published: 01 January 2016
... supported the British; Huron-Wyandots near Detroit supported Pontiac reluctantly and withdrew support quickly.8 As for the St. Joseph Potawatomis, their leg- endary Catholicism posed no obstacle to fighting the British: they killed most members of the local British garrison, and they raided the Detroit...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2018) 65 (3): 533–534.
Published: 01 July 2018
... and Wyandots, and as a primary source, readable as the enlightened project of an eighteenth-century British administrator. Dixon and Tiro’s version of the History combines the entire first edition, published in 1727 (“Part I”), with an additional thirteen chapters (“Part II”) and new introduction (“Appendix...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2019) 66 (4): 759–760.
Published: 01 October 2019
... colonial space. The French and British empires, British settlers from the seaboard colonies, and Shawnees, Delawares, Wyandots, and Haudenosaunees, all jockeyed for control of the region in the seventeenth and early eighteenth centuries. None completely succeeded, making the Ohio Valley a place where...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2021) 68 (3): 429–448.
Published: 01 July 2021
..., and their allies were engaged in talks with the Spanish. In addition to encouragement from the Spanish, Martin complained that “two Wyandot chiefs are now in Chickamogga . . . who tell these Indians that all the different Tribes of Indians will turn out to war this fall.” 21 The Cherokee and Shawnee continued...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2005) 52 (3): 635–641.
Published: 01 July 2005
... questions they ask of them, one cannot help but think that the view remains from the outside looking in—that we learn as much about de Soto, Bougainville, Allouez, Bouquet, and Amherst as we do about Ojibwas, Osages, Pueblos, Comanches, Ottawas, and Wyandots. This, in turn, brings new meaning to Review...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2009) 56 (2): 285–302.
Published: 01 April 2009
... that there was an Indian chief in a major group in Michigan who was of African origin. His name was Mucketycoocoose, which translates affectionately as “Old Black Hog.” Descendants of that family have remained in Michigan. Another group of Indians that I studied quite closely, the Wyandots in Sandusky, Ohio...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2006) 53 (4): 657–687.
Published: 01 October 2006
... was the only Shawnee chief willing to attend the major British colonial conference at Lancaster that year. There Six Nations representatives sold British colonial governments dubious and contested rights to Ohio lands then occupied by the Shawnee, Mingo, Dela- ware, Wyandot, and Miami. Some...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2018) 65 (3): 349–371.
Published: 01 July 2018
... (also called Wyandot) were located in villages along the Scioto, on lands east of the swamp, and they were settled as far south as the Ohio. The Black Swamp was a trapping ground for most of the villages in the Ohio River valley. In the west, the fur trade was dominated by the Miami, and to the east...
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Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2014) 61 (1): 79–98.
Published: 01 January 2014
..., Stewart, a black man, established the Methodist Episcopal Church’s first Indian mission. This mission was located among the Wyandots of Sandusky, Ohio. Like Hall, Stewart eventually became disenchanted with white Methodists and joined the AME Church, an organization he viewed as an authentic body...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2009) 56 (1): 195–198.
Published: 01 January 2009
... La Vere, University of North Carolina at Wilmington You’ve read this story before—the forced removal of American Indians from the eastern United States during the first half of the nineteenth cen- tury. This time it is the Shawnees, Wyandots, Potawatomis, and Delawares that John...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2009) 56 (1): 199–200.
Published: 01 January 2009
...- tury. This time it is the Shawnees, Wyandots, Potawatomis, and Delawares that John Bowes, an assistant professor of history at Eastern Kentucky 206 Book Reviews University, puts under the microscope. But switch out the names...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2009) 56 (1): 200–201.
Published: 01 January 2009
... La Vere, University of North Carolina at Wilmington You’ve read this story before—the forced removal of American Indians from the eastern United States during the first half of the nineteenth cen- tury. This time it is the Shawnees, Wyandots, Potawatomis, and Delawares that John...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2009) 56 (1): 202–203.
Published: 01 January 2009
...- tury. This time it is the Shawnees, Wyandots, Potawatomis, and Delawares that John Bowes, an assistant professor of history at Eastern Kentucky 206 Book Reviews University, puts under the microscope. But switch out the names...