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Works Progress Administration

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Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2021) 68 (3): 407–427.
Published: 01 July 2021
...Rebecca M. Webster Abstract Colonization efforts over time have changed Oneida relationships with corn drastically. This study examines that history through a collection of stories told by Oneida people for the Work Progress Administration (WPA) between 1938 and 1942. Furthermore, the people’s...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2019) 66 (1): 49–70.
Published: 01 January 2019
... photographed with them in front of the monument. 23 The reservation was included in suggested itineraries advertised in national newspapers, and the outline of the Standing Rock was turned into a road marker (White 1936 ). When, in 1938, the North Dakota Works Progress Administration (WPA) issued its...
FIGURES
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2014) 61 (3): 419–444.
Published: 01 July 2014
... con- ducted oral histories among Oneidas on the reservation during the 1940s as part of a Works Progress Administration project, many still harbored 430 Doug Kiel bitter memories of Wheelock even though almost twenty years had passed since...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2020) 67 (4): 603–619.
Published: 01 October 2020
... of the Works Progress Administration, ethnographers in the associated Federal Writers’ Project, created a “Slave Narrative Collection” from 1936–38 based on more than 2,300 interviews with former slaves of African descent. In 1936 an amateur ethnographer questioned an elderly man named George Fortman...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2019) 66 (3): 565–592.
Published: 01 July 2019
... the case files are organized by the students’ names. Box numbers are included. I would like to thank Tammy Proctor and members of the Utah State History Department’s Works in Progress group for their helpful comments on an early draft of this article. I am also grateful to Farina King, Brianna...
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Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2008) 55 (1): 87–118.
Published: 01 January 2008
... to their fisheries, Indian agents tended to argue that native people could be managed in ways that would eventually bring them under the general regu- lations and transform them into civilized, progressive citizens. In this article, I show how at a seminal moment, individual Indian agents across...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2008) 55 (4): 553–578.
Published: 01 October 2008
... the revolution, in part due to revolutionary indigenism. His rise and fall also demonstrates the persis- tence of prerevolutionary ideas about the Maya that equated progress with acculturation and assumed their racial inferiority. In his native town of Umán during the Porfiriato (Porfirio...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2007) 54 (3): 445–472.
Published: 01 July 2007
...Jerry K. Jacka Ipili speakers in the highlands of Papua New Guinea creatively use the category “whiteman” both to structure their longing for socioeconomic progress and development and to critique the very institutions associated with development that they desire. This article explores the history...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2016) 63 (1): 119–142.
Published: 01 January 2016
... of the Progressive Movement in America . Oxford : Oxford University Press . Mignolo Walter D. 2000 Local Histories/Global Designs: Coloniality, Subaltern Knowledges, and Border Thinking . Princeton, NJ : Princeton University Press . Mills Inez 1905 “Legends.” Native American 4...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2005) 52 (2): 407–435.
Published: 01 April 2005
... resistance had the forest service become a major employer of Malagasy farmers. While colonial administrators concentrated on the lumber and labor needs of the rail system and concessionaires in the 1920s, they also traced the progress of reforestation works and the predations of unauthorized...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2016) 63 (1): 95–117.
Published: 01 January 2016
... in ways that play on its meaninglessness and thus hinder the capacity of narrative to situate contemporary life in terms of a history of progress. This kind of denial of a modernist historical consciousness is another aspect of humiliation, and it suggests that anthropologists and ethnohistorians rethink...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2018) 65 (2): 215–246.
Published: 01 April 2018
... resources mentioned in the interviews, including coal resources, the bull pasture, springs, creeks, and even a water pump. He included multiple churches (some of which were relocated “up top” in advance of the flood), dams built by the Works Progress Administration, the round hall (used for traditional...
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Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2014) 61 (3): 585–587.
Published: 01 July 2014
...’ holis- tic well-­being resides in Davis’s discussion of a second important native woman. Ojibwe mother of six Charlotte Day relocated her family from northern Minnesota to a St. Paul housing project in 1967. Her children ini- tially struggled to progress within a public school system that proved...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2006) 53 (1): 143–172.
Published: 01 January 2006
... but in the rains are very soft and sticky owing to the cotton soil67 Turpin flirted with the idea of taxation—claiming that adult males were able to pay five shillings per annum, although at first it might have to be collected as livestock. In the event little progress was made in intro- ducing a cash...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2011) 58 (4): 613–652.
Published: 01 October 2011
... aztecas . Mexico City : Instituto Nacional de Antropología e Historia . Morgan Lewis H. 1877 Ancient Society; or, Researches in the Lines of Human Progress from Savagery through Barbarism to Civilization . New York : Henry Holt . Muecke Frances 2003 Humanists in the Roman...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2011) 58 (3): 491–523.
Published: 01 July 2011
... that the imperial regime’s insistence on holding the reserves inviolate blocked the economic progress of the colony by putting these lands off limits to development. In an attempt to resolve these contradictions, colonial officials sought to introduce an element of flexibility into the native...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2008) 55 (2): 183–201.
Published: 01 April 2008
... misgiving as to what Canada may do to them and these doubts have tended to discourage them in their progress. As the avarice of civilized white-men seems to have no limit, the holdings of the Indians should be placed beyond the reach of a con- stituted guardian who must cater to the wishes...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2008) 55 (4): 509–524.
Published: 01 October 2008
..., and mestizo power seekers forged modern Mexico. Across the border, Richard Adams (1956: 888, 893–97) proposed stages by which Maya Indians acculturated into Guatemalan Ladino society, later reformulated as a co-evolutionary process instead of a linear progression (Adams 1994: 531). His subsequent...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2009) 56 (4): 733–739.
Published: 01 October 2009
.... During this period of time, indigenous leaders worked to resolve the contradictions of Bolivian liberalism, test- ing the claims of the universality of the concept of liberal citizenship by demanding individual and collective rights while also asserting their dif- ference as Indians. “Progress...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2016) 63 (3): 497–518.
Published: 01 July 2016
... return to Ecuador, Velasco ( 1974 : 37) told an audience in Guayaquil, the country’s largest city, that Ecuadorians must raise themselves out of their misery and create a unified “people,” lest the country “remain in diapers before progress and all the Americas.” In his speech Velasco framed the border...