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White Earth

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Published: 01 July 2017
Figure 3. Map of the White Earth Reservation Figure 3. Map of the White Earth Reservation More
Image
Published: 01 July 2017
Figure 14. White Earth powwow participants, 1912 Figure 14. White Earth powwow participants, 1912 More
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2017) 64 (3): 345–377.
Published: 01 July 2017
...Figure 3. Map of the White Earth Reservation Figure 3. Map of the White Earth Reservation ...
FIGURES | View All (18)
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2016) 63 (4): 764–765.
Published: 01 October 2016
...Theresa M. Schenck Reference Doerfler Jill 2007 “ Fictions and Fractions: Reconciling Citizenship Regulations with Cultural Values among the White Earth Nation .” PhD diss., University of Minnesota . Appendix 1 is the Revised Constitution and Bylaws of the Minnesota Chippewa...
Image
Published: 01 July 2017
Figure 13. John Smith dancing at the White Earth powwow, 1919 Figure 13. John Smith dancing at the White Earth powwow, 1919 More
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2002) 49 (4): 769–788.
Published: 01 October 2002
... of the place as a ceremonial space changed little over time. Meyer’s study of the White Earth reservation in Minnesota identified crucial links between land- scape, culture, and ethnogeography. According to her findings, less accul...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2000) 47 (2): 469–481.
Published: 01 April 2000
... that boarding schools were safe havens for children and families in distress and that they supplemented the traditional practice of adoption. Child describes a White Earth boy, for example, whom one social worker recommended...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2009) 56 (3): 423–447.
Published: 01 July 2009
..., for example, White Earth Anishinaabes devised blood classifications that included cultural and economic indicators of the extent to which individu- als were assimilated. Cherokees and Choctaws in Oklahoma have likewise designed categories of belonging predicated on indices of phenotypes, resi- dence...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2016) 63 (1): 119–142.
Published: 01 January 2016
..., instead highlighting their hope for a future of security and progress in a language of partnership. “We are not paupers as perhaps you have been informed,” they asserted in 1906; “we are workers and farmers. Our forefathers have farmed and made their living on this reser- vation before any white men...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2007) 54 (3): 473–508.
Published: 01 July 2007
... for improving one’s status within the tribe, those who distributed annuity goods rose in prominence, challenging the traditional power structure headed by White Plume and other established leaders. White Plume and sixteen Kansa families left the Blue Earth village to form their own community two...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2002) 49 (1): 41–68.
Published: 01 January 2002
... before the white man’’ shook apart houses and caused rockslides from the mountains (Hill-Tout 1978b [1907]: 158). One village was completely destroyed in such a slide. The shaking of the earth was so pronounced that the people...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2015) 62 (2): 405–406.
Published: 01 April 2015
...Jessica Joyce Christie Earth Politics: Religion, Decolonization, and Bolivia's Indigenous Intellectuals . By Ari Waskar . ( Durham, NC : Duke University Press , 2014 . xiii + 262 pp., acknowledgments, two appendixes, notes, glossary, selected bibliography, index . $89.95 cloth...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2000) 47 (1): 67–99.
Published: 01 January 2000
... maintain it is Kekea’o, the earth mother or tree of origins who fled from her source to the West. In myths about Kekea’o, for instance, the first human beings stem from part of this tree and were reproduced in a similar way...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2000) 47 (1): 29–65.
Published: 01 January 2000
...Jaap Timmer Imyan people of the southwestern Bird's Head Peninsula of Irian Jaya await an event that promises wealth, justice, and a new world order: Jesus Christ's kingdom on earth. Millennial beliefs among the Imyan derive from a potent blend of Christian doctrine, ancestral transgressions...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2000) 47 (1): 101–111.
Published: 01 January 2000
... in saying that Afek created the world because God had done so and given the power to the white men? For sure, God must have come back again and sent His son to help the people on earth, otherwise why should the white men have come...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2017) 64 (3): 379–400.
Published: 01 July 2017
... . Cambridge, MA . Fletcher Alice C. 1887b “ The White Buffalo Festival of the Uncpapas .” In 16th Report of the Peabody Museum of American Archaeology and Ethnology, Harvard University, [for] 1882 . Pp. 260 – 75 . Cambridge, MA . Gibbon Guy E. 2003 The Sioux: The Dakota and Lakota...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2019) 66 (4): 689–719.
Published: 01 October 2019
... the warping frame ( chuch ), which is mentioned in the chant discussed by Knowlton and Dzidz Yam (this issue), where X Bolon Puc (Lady Nine Hills) is named as its icon. The hieroglyphic caption to the almanac’s first frame reads: sinah u chuch sak kab’/ix oox wi’il , “White Lady (Earth’s) warping frame...
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Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2000) 47 (1): 3–27.
Published: 01 January 2000
... and montane interiors. It is also one of the most linguistically diverse places on earth (Pawley and Ross1993; Foley 1986). The eastern half of the island is Papua New Guinea, which gained independence from Australian...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2015) 62 (2): 403–405.
Published: 01 April 2015
..., such as the widespread belief that Afro-­Caribbeans used the blood of white children as medicine. It is difficult to pin down a unifying theme to these diverging approaches. I find that the book’s conclusion, while humorous and eru- dite, pushes a bit too hard at the parallels between anti-­obeah campaigns...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2001) 48 (4): 689–712.
Published: 01 October 2001
..., beginning in the 1880s, the majority of Arapahos were drawn to Chris- tianity. As Elkin (1940: 243–4) notes, Arapaho people ‘‘seemed to take to the missions more easily than to any other phase of White culture’’ and, more precisely...