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Tlaloc

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Journal Article
Ethnohistory (1 October 2015) 62 (4): 683–706.
Published: 01 October 2015
...Catherine R. DiCesare This study examines the unusual colonial Codex Borbonicus image of a pre-Columbian springtime festival known as Huey Tozoztli. It attends to the special prominence the Borbonicus gives to the rain god Tlaloc, a dedication at odds with more usual venerations to the maize...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (1 January 2004) 51 (1): 198–200.
Published: 01 January 2004
.... The work is mainly an interpretation of four Aztec rituals dedicated to the deity Tlaloc and described by Sahagún in his monumen- tal Florentine Codex. Arnold tries to thread his way through the minefield of competing philosophical and theoretical approaches to his subject, but just as he...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (1 January 2015) 62 (1): 171–172.
Published: 01 January 2015
... the negative impact of the outcome of don Carlos Ometochtli’s trial on Tlaloc’s worship, ritual pilgrimages to Mount Tlaloc continue today. The importance of Mesoamerican landscape continues in Ángel Julián García Zambrano’s chapter discussing its impact on establishing and framing memories of...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (1 January 2015) 62 (1): 172–173.
Published: 01 January 2015
... blends ethnographic and archival research to illustrate how despite the negative impact of the outcome of don Carlos Ometochtli’s trial on Tlaloc’s worship, ritual pilgrimages to Mount Tlaloc continue today. The importance of Mesoamerican landscape continues in Ángel Julián García Zambrano’s...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (1 January 2004) 51 (1): 196–198.
Published: 01 January 2004
... on the writings of sixteenth-century cleric Bernardino de Sahagún. The work is mainly an interpretation of four Aztec rituals dedicated to the deity Tlaloc and described by Sahagún in his monumen- tal Florentine Codex. Arnold tries to thread his way through the minefield of competing philosophical...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (1 October 2015) 62 (4): 803–806.
Published: 01 October 2015
... and Early Modern Cultural Relativism 17 Bricker, Victoria R. Where There’s a Will, There’s a Way: The Signifi- cance of Scribal Variation in Colonial Maya Testaments 421 DiCesare, Catherine R. Tlaloc Rites and the Huey Tozoztli Festival in the Mexican Codex Borbonicus 683 Downey...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (1 April 2011) 58 (2): 263–291.
Published: 01 April 2011
...) . Matson Dan S. , trans. Ethnohistory 22 : 193 – 221 . Barlow Robert Smisor George 1943 Nombre de Dios, Durango: Two Documents in Nàhuatl Concerning Its Foundation . Sacramento, CA : House of Tlaloc . Behar Ruth 1987 The Visions of a Guachichil Witch in 1599: A Window...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (1 April 2001) 48 (1-2): 357–359.
Published: 01 April 2001
... / sheet 366 of 384 clude the natives’ worship of chalchiuitl (precious stones) in their homes and their funerary rites, such as when breast milk was stored in a reed or sprinkled over the grave of a dead child. Nor could worship of Tlaloc and...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (1 April 2001) 48 (1-2): 359–361.
Published: 01 April 2001
... and their funerary rites, such as when breast milk was stored in a reed or sprinkled over the grave of a dead child. Nor could worship of Tlaloc and other deities (Ahuaques), with offerings of candles, copal incense, and food...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (1 April 2001) 48 (1-2): 361–363.
Published: 01 April 2001
... sprinkled over the grave of a dead child. Nor could worship of Tlaloc and other deities (Ahuaques), with offerings of candles, copal incense, and food, be condoned. Moreover, Nahuas failed to confess their big sins, and in...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (1 April 2001) 48 (1-2): 363–364.
Published: 01 April 2001
... / sheet 366 of 384 clude the natives’ worship of chalchiuitl (precious stones) in their homes and their funerary rites, such as when breast milk was stored in a reed or sprinkled over the grave of a dead child. Nor could worship of Tlaloc and...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (1 April 2001) 48 (1-2): 364–366.
Published: 01 April 2001
... / sheet 366 of 384 clude the natives’ worship of chalchiuitl (precious stones) in their homes and their funerary rites, such as when breast milk was stored in a reed or sprinkled over the grave of a dead child. Nor could worship of Tlaloc and...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (1 April 2001) 48 (1-2): 366–368.
Published: 01 April 2001
... / sheet 366 of 384 clude the natives’ worship of chalchiuitl (precious stones) in their homes and their funerary rites, such as when breast milk was stored in a reed or sprinkled over the grave of a dead child. Nor could worship of Tlaloc and...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (1 April 2001) 48 (1-2): 368–372.
Published: 01 April 2001
... and their funerary rites, such as when breast milk was stored in a reed or sprinkled over the grave of a dead child. Nor could worship of Tlaloc and other deities (Ahuaques), with offerings of candles, copal incense, and food...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (1 April 2001) 48 (1-2): 373–375.
Published: 01 April 2001
... / sheet 366 of 384 clude the natives’ worship of chalchiuitl (precious stones) in their homes and their funerary rites, such as when breast milk was stored in a reed or sprinkled over the grave of a dead child. Nor could worship of Tlaloc and...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (1 April 2001) 48 (1-2): 375–377.
Published: 01 April 2001
... and their funerary rites, such as when breast milk was stored in a reed or sprinkled over the grave of a dead child. Nor could worship of Tlaloc and other deities (Ahuaques), with offerings of candles, copal incense, and food...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (1 April 2001) 48 (1-2): 377–379.
Published: 01 April 2001
... and their funerary rites, such as when breast milk was stored in a reed or sprinkled over the grave of a dead child. Nor could worship of Tlaloc and other deities (Ahuaques), with offerings of candles, copal incense, and food...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (1 January 2010) 57 (1): 51–72.
Published: 01 January 2010
... have become impatient with replications of such detail. On the other hand, the Spanish column provides detailed descriptions of the costumes of Quetzal- coatl and Tlaloc with which the Mexica ambassadors regaled Cortés on his ship—descriptions that do not appear in the Nahuatl column. Perhaps...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (1 January 2019) 66 (1): 95–116.
Published: 01 January 2019
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (1 July 2005) 52 (3): 643–644.
Published: 01 July 2005
... sixteenth-century water basin in the Francis- can convent of Tepeapulco, Mexico. In a beautiful example of convinc- ing and logical argumentation, Escalante Gonzalbo shows that the carved stones, representing the court of Neptune in which the Roman god has been replaced by the Mexican rain god Tlaloc...