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Pedro de Alvarado

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Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2022) 69 (1): 53–79.
Published: 01 January 2022
.... This article examines the question by focusing on Pedro de Alvarado, a leading member of Hernán Cortés’s contingent, who was known as Tonatiuh—a Nahuatl word that designated the sun, the day, and the sun god. Indigenous peoples in Mexico and Guatemala used the name during the invasion, and Nahua, K’iche...
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Published: 01 January 2022
Figure 5. A probable portrait of Pedro de Alvarado carrying a solar shield. Detail of f. 250v from the Relación Geográfica de Tlaxcala by Diego Muñoz Camargo. Courtesy of University of Glasgow Library Archives and Special Collections, MS Hunter 242, through Margarita Cossich Vielman, Antonio More
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Published: 01 January 2022
Figure 6. Death of Pedro de Alvarado in the year 10 House, 1541. Detail from Codex Telleriano-Remensis, f. 46r. Courtesy of Bibliothèque Nationale de France. Figure 6. Death of Pedro de Alvarado in the year 10 House, 1541. Detail from Codex Telleriano-Remensis, f. 46r. Courtesy of Bibliothèque More
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Published: 01 July 2019
Figure 6. Statue of the conquistador Pedro de Alvarado (1485–1541), the work of sculptor Estanislao García Olivares, in Badajoz, Spain. Photo by the author. Figure 6. Statue of the conquistador Pedro de Alvarado (1485–1541), the work of sculptor Estanislao García Olivares, in Badajoz, Spain More
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2019) 66 (3): 409–435.
Published: 01 July 2019
...Figure 6. Statue of the conquistador Pedro de Alvarado (1485–1541), the work of sculptor Estanislao García Olivares, in Badajoz, Spain. Photo by the author. Figure 6. Statue of the conquistador Pedro de Alvarado (1485–1541), the work of sculptor Estanislao García Olivares, in Badajoz, Spain...
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Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2013) 60 (4): 693–719.
Published: 01 October 2013
...Oswaldo Chinchilla Mazariegos A major debate in the history of the Spanish conquest of Guatemala revolves around Tecum (Tecún Umán), the K'iche' captain who died in confrontation with Pedro de Alvarado, according to sixteenth-century indigenous texts. Analysis of these texts shows that Tecum's...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2009) 56 (1): 187–193.
Published: 01 January 2009
...: Spanish, Nahua, and Maya Accounts of the Con- quest Wars is an equally rich collection of primary materials on conquest- era Guatemala. Matthew Restall and Florine Asselbergs seek to demolish myths associated with that conquest, shifting the focus away from Pedro de Alvarado to other Spaniards...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2018) 65 (2): 269–295.
Published: 01 April 2018
... (e.g., Sepúlveda 1941 : 73, 77). For instance, Gonzalo de Alvarado, Pedro’s cousin, claimed that at Quetzaltenango, the conquistadors were “trying to bring all the land at peace and calling the natives in the name of His Majesty . . . all the Spaniards being calm without getting angry about anything...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2015) 62 (1): 169–170.
Published: 01 January 2015
... to the book and giving hints of what to expect in the follow- ing chapters. In an enthralling, almost storytelling way, the initial part provides a chronological reconstruction of the Spanish invasion of Guatemala by the conquistador Pedro de Alvarado. The associated chapters critically analyze...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2011) 58 (2): 293–321.
Published: 01 April 2011
..., was begun in 1524 by the Spanish conqueror Pedro de Alvarado (see figure 1). Alvarado, with the assistance of the rival Kaqchikeles, fol- lowed a systematic divide-­and-­conquer pattern to successfully subdue the K’iche, who at the time maintained military hegemony over the other Maya groups...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2017) 64 (4): 497–527.
Published: 01 October 2017
... hispanism in translations and bureaucratic language during the sixteenth century, persisting all along the 17 th century” (Luciano Formisano, personal communication, September 2015). 21 At least four religious took part in the two expeditions that Pedro de Alvarado made to Tututepec; the Mercedarian...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2016) 63 (3): 469–495.
Published: 01 July 2016
... of several K’iche’ leaders, including Don Francisco Iskin, and Pedro de Alvarado’s subsequent invasion of the Guatemalan highlands. 3 Scholars dispute the Highland Maya títulos’ intended and actual function (e.g., Restall 1997a : 261–65), although most discussion centers on their legal use. Néstor...
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Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2003) 50 (4): 707–712.
Published: 01 October 2003
... through 20, Lovell moves back from the contemporary scene to provide historical context in a tour de force of colonial and modern Guatemalan society from Pedro de Alvarado Tseng 2003.12.12 06:08 211 Review Essays...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2011) 58 (4): 653–682.
Published: 01 October 2011
..., and Indian slaves who were freed by the New Laws. The distinc- tion between indios amigos and naborías was substantial, and the indios amigos worked hard to maintain it. Indeed, the indigenous allies of Pedro de Alvarado who helped to conquer Guatemala and who founded their own settlement...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2006) 53 (3): 625–628.
Published: 01 July 2006
... information about Iximché, capital of the Kaqchikel Maya, in the highlands of Guatemala. Conquered by the Spanish under Pedro de Alvarado in 1524 and abandoned by 1526, Iximché is one of the most intriguing sites in all of Mesoamerica. First, it was constructed by the Kaqchikel only half a century...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2006) 53 (3): 617–618.
Published: 01 July 2006
.... Conquered by the Spanish under Pedro de Alvarado in 1524 and abandoned by 1526, Iximché is one of the most intriguing sites in all of Mesoamerica. First, it was constructed by the Kaqchikel only half a century before the conquest. Thus, its remains afford us a snapshot of a late-preconquest...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2006) 53 (3): 618–620.
Published: 01 July 2006
.... Conquered by the Spanish under Pedro de Alvarado in 1524 and abandoned by 1526, Iximché is one of the most intriguing sites in all of Mesoamerica. First, it was constructed by the Kaqchikel only half a century before the conquest. Thus, its remains afford us a snapshot of a late-preconquest...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2006) 53 (3): 620–621.
Published: 01 July 2006
... University Archaeology and Ethnohistory of Iximché is a praiseworthy effort to salvage archaeological information about Iximché, capital of the Kaqchikel Maya, in the highlands of Guatemala. Conquered by the Spanish under Pedro de Alvarado in 1524 and abandoned by 1526, Iximché is one of the most...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2006) 53 (3): 622–623.
Published: 01 July 2006
..., in the highlands of Guatemala. Conquered by the Spanish under Pedro de Alvarado in 1524 and abandoned by 1526, Iximché is one of the most intriguing sites in all of Mesoamerica. First, it was constructed by the Kaqchikel only half a century before the conquest. Thus, its remains afford us a snapshot...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2006) 53 (3): 623–625.
Published: 01 July 2006
.... Conquered by the Spanish under Pedro de Alvarado in 1524 and abandoned by 1526, Iximché is one of the most intriguing sites in all of Mesoamerica. First, it was constructed by the Kaqchikel only half a century before the conquest. Thus, its remains afford us a snapshot of a late-preconquest...