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Panama-Pacific International Exposition

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Journal Article
Ethnohistory (1 April 2016) 63 (2): 273–300.
Published: 01 April 2016
...Abigail Markwyn Abstract This article examines the participation and representation of Indians at San Francisco’s 1915 Panama-Pacific International Exposition (PPIE), arguing that the PPIE represents a change in cultural depictions of Indians from the vanishing Indian of the turn of the century to...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (1 July 2003) 50 (3): 419–445.
Published: 01 July 2003
.... Benedict, Burton 1983 The Anthropology of World's Fairs. In The Anthropology of World's Fairs: San Francisco's Panama Pacific International Exposition of 1915 . Burton Benedict, ed. Pp. 1 -65. Berkeley, ca: Lowie Museum of Anthropology. Cohen, Erik 1979 A Phenomenology of Tourist Experiences...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (1 July 2003) 50 (3): 567–573.
Published: 01 July 2003
.... 191 -210. Santa Fe, nm: School of American Research. Benedict, Burton, ed. 1983 The Anthropology of World's Fairs: San Francisco's Panama Pacific International Exposition of 1915 . Berkeley, ca: Lowie Museum of Anthropology. Bruner, Edward M. 1996 Tourism in the Balinese Borderzone. In...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (1 October 2014) 61 (4): 635–653.
Published: 01 October 2014
... company decided on Spanish-­Mediterranean designs “as the most adaptable and elastic for our purposes.” According to an architecture critic at the time, the style was popularized in the 1915 Panama-­California Exposition in San Diego, and designers considered Spanish motifs to be “ideal for...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (1 January 2011) 58 (1): 149–153.
Published: 01 January 2011
... progress. Americans’ conflicted relationship with modernity took center stage in 1915, when San Francisco hosted the Panama Pacific International Expedition. In a sign of technological advance, President Wilson opened the fair gates from afar by pushing a gold button in the White House...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (1 January 2011) 58 (1): 153–154.
Published: 01 January 2011
... progress. Americans’ conflicted relationship with modernity took center stage in 1915, when San Francisco hosted the Panama Pacific International Expedition. In a sign of technological advance, President Wilson opened the fair gates from afar by pushing a gold button in the White House...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (1 January 2011) 58 (1): 154–156.
Published: 01 January 2011
... progress. Americans’ conflicted relationship with modernity took center stage in 1915, when San Francisco hosted the Panama Pacific International Expedition. In a sign of technological advance, President Wilson opened the fair gates from afar by pushing a gold button in the White House...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (1 January 2011) 58 (1): 156–157.
Published: 01 January 2011
... Panama Pacific International Expedition. In a sign of technological advance, President Wilson opened the fair gates from afar by pushing a gold button in the White House. Anthropologists discussed another form of progress, the science of eugenics, at Race Betterment Week. Like John Muir’s cam...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (1 January 2011) 58 (1): 158–159.
Published: 01 January 2011
... progress. Americans’ conflicted relationship with modernity took center stage in 1915, when San Francisco hosted the Panama Pacific International Expedition. In a sign of technological advance, President Wilson opened the fair gates from afar by pushing a gold button in the White House...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (1 January 2011) 58 (1): 159–161.
Published: 01 January 2011
... Panama Pacific International Expedition. In a sign of technological advance, President Wilson opened the fair gates from afar by pushing a gold button in the White House. Anthropologists discussed another form of progress, the science of eugenics, at Race Betterment Week. Like John Muir’s cam...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (1 January 2011) 58 (1): 161–162.
Published: 01 January 2011
... progress. Americans’ conflicted relationship with modernity took center stage in 1915, when San Francisco hosted the Panama Pacific International Expedition. In a sign of technological advance, President Wilson opened the fair gates from afar by pushing a gold button in the White House...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (1 January 2011) 58 (1): 162–164.
Published: 01 January 2011
... Panama Pacific International Expedition. In a sign of technological advance, President Wilson opened the fair gates from afar by pushing a gold button in the White House. Anthropologists discussed another form of progress, the science of eugenics, at Race Betterment Week. Like John Muir’s cam...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (1 January 2011) 58 (1): 164–165.
Published: 01 January 2011
... Panama Pacific International Expedition. In a sign of technological advance, President Wilson opened the fair gates from afar by pushing a gold button in the White House. Anthropologists discussed another form of progress, the science of eugenics, at Race Betterment Week. Like John Muir’s cam...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (1 January 2011) 58 (1): 166–167.
Published: 01 January 2011
... progress. Americans’ conflicted relationship with modernity took center stage in 1915, when San Francisco hosted the Panama Pacific International Expedition. In a sign of technological advance, President Wilson opened the fair gates from afar by pushing a gold button in the White House...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (1 January 2011) 58 (1): 167–168.
Published: 01 January 2011
... Panama Pacific International Expedition. In a sign of technological advance, President Wilson opened the fair gates from afar by pushing a gold button in the White House. Anthropologists discussed another form of progress, the science of eugenics, at Race Betterment Week. Like John Muir’s cam...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (1 January 2011) 58 (1): 169–171.
Published: 01 January 2011
... progress. Americans’ conflicted relationship with modernity took center stage in 1915, when San Francisco hosted the Panama Pacific International Expedition. In a sign of technological advance, President Wilson opened the fair gates from afar by pushing a gold button in the White House...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (1 January 2011) 58 (1): 172–173.
Published: 01 January 2011
... Panama Pacific International Expedition. In a sign of technological advance, President Wilson opened the fair gates from afar by pushing a gold button in the White House. Anthropologists discussed another form of progress, the science of eugenics, at Race Betterment Week. Like John Muir’s cam...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (1 January 2011) 58 (1): 173–175.
Published: 01 January 2011
... Panama Pacific International Expedition. In a sign of technological advance, President Wilson opened the fair gates from afar by pushing a gold button in the White House. Anthropologists discussed another form of progress, the science of eugenics, at Race Betterment Week. Like John Muir’s cam...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (1 January 2011) 58 (1): 175–176.
Published: 01 January 2011
... Panama Pacific International Expedition. In a sign of technological advance, President Wilson opened the fair gates from afar by pushing a gold button in the White House. Anthropologists discussed another form of progress, the science of eugenics, at Race Betterment Week. Like John Muir’s cam...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (1 January 2011) 58 (1): 176–178.
Published: 01 January 2011
... progress. Americans’ conflicted relationship with modernity took center stage in 1915, when San Francisco hosted the Panama Pacific International Expedition. In a sign of technological advance, President Wilson opened the fair gates from afar by pushing a gold button in the White House...