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Jesuit missionaries

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Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2007) 54 (2): 223–244.
Published: 01 April 2007
...Seth Mallios Historical narratives describing the demise of a sixteenth-century Jesuit mission on the Chesapeake grew from direct accounts of indigenous murder to elaborate constructions of the missionaries' divine sacrifice. A seriation of details from the seven contemporary Jesuit sources...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2018) 65 (4): 575–595.
Published: 01 October 2018
...Pablo Ibáñez-Bonillo Abstract This article analyzes the violent deaths of two Jesuit missionaries in the regions of Marajó (Pará) and the Itapecuru River (Maranhão). Their tragic end serves as a starting point through which one can explore the social relations that took place between Europeans...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2013) 60 (1): 101–124.
Published: 01 January 2013
...Julia Sarreal Both the Crown and Catholic missionaries believed that frontier Indians needed to practice settled agriculture and animal husbandry in order to become civilized. For over a century Jesuit missionaries among the Guaraní Indians of South America tried to Europeanize mission inhabitants...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2019) 66 (2): 275–300.
Published: 01 April 2019
...Marcela Mendoza Abstract The Bolivian Tobas in northern Gran Chaco were mobile hunter-gatherers organized in bands. They called themselves qomleʔk , and spoke a distinctive variation of Guaicuruan language. For three hundred years, coalitions of Toba braves successfully rejected Jesuit missionaries...
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Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2022) 69 (4): 401–427.
Published: 01 October 2022
...Alcira Dueñas Abstract Transforming the religious outlook of Indigenous populations in the colonial Andes became an imperial undertaking that required more than an external change. In the Andes, the missionary enterprise of the Jesuits created a wholesale design of mechanisms for an effective...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2022) 69 (4): 429–449.
Published: 01 October 2022
... the destabilizing pressures of encomienda (forced-labor system) labor drafts (Maeder 2013 ). 2 Referred to by the term reducción (reduction), the new towns established by Jesuit missionaries were designed to provide a place where the population could be introduced to Christianity, and where they would...
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Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2002) 49 (2): 281–317.
Published: 01 April 2002
... stipulated, in accordance with Indian wishes, that only Jesuit missionaries would be given leave to enter the Darién. Since the eastern Panamá frontier straddled separate imperial jurisdictions, the royal cédula that placed the king’s...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2009) 56 (3): 509–514.
Published: 01 July 2009
... natives; “Nightmare Conversions,” which focuses on missionary efforts in the Andes and the eventual process of extir- pation of idolatry that also occurred there; and “Christian Shamans among the Guarani,” which tells of the activities of the Jesuits in what is now Para- guay. In the second section...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2018) 65 (1): 187–188.
Published: 01 January 2018
... and 1767, most of Spain’s immense Amazonian territory (roughly 320,000 square kilometers) was ruled by Jesuit missionaries from their base in Borja on the Marañón River. Jesuit authority stretched from Brazil to the Andean foothills. By 1767, when they were expelled from Ecuador and Peru, they had founded...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2018) 65 (2): 338–339.
Published: 01 April 2018
... has our attention, Gary Van Valen uses it well. The Mojos lived in savannas along the Mamoré River as it flows toward Brazil. From 1682 onward, they congregated onto Jesuit missions in what later became the Department of Beni. Van Valen traces their trajectory through the eighteenth and nineteenth...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2021) 68 (3): 385–405.
Published: 01 July 2021
... maintained independence and sovereignty south of the Biobío until the Chilean republic conquered the region in 1883. In an attempt to slowly erode Mapuche resistance and introduce Christianity to the region, the Spaniards resorted to the help of the Jesuit missionaries who had to teach the doctrine...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2007) 54 (4): 639–668.
Published: 01 October 2007
..., and Jesuit missionaries. While the council watched, Saint Lusson climbed a height of land that overlooked the village, planted a cross and a cedar pole bearing the king’s coat of arms, and took possession, “in his place and in his Majesty’s name, Ethnohistory 54:4 (Fall 2007)  doi 10.1215/00141801...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2018) 65 (4): 621–645.
Published: 01 October 2018
..., these polities were probably multilingual (Heckenberger and Neves 2009 ; Schaan 2012 : 106). 15 Other sources point to hostilities between the north- and south-bank peoples, such as Acuña and the Jesuit missionary Samuel Fritz in the late seventeenth century. 16 BAL, Cod. 51-V-22, f. 128, para...
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Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2014) 61 (3): 575–577.
Published: 01 July 2014
... of indigenous slavery, using the rich linguistic material produced by Jesuit missionaries. The chapter titled “I Make Him My Dog / My Slave” reveals the close con- nection between indigenous slavery in the North American interior and concepts of domestication. The linguistic evidence and native cultural...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2000) 47 (2): 423–452.
Published: 01 April 2000
... the Jesuits frequently despised. In- deed, most missionary priests viewed the fur-trade husbands of these con- verts as licentious drunkards who undermined Christian ideals; the Jesuits even vigorously supported a seventeenth-century...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2008) 55 (3): 439–464.
Published: 01 July 2008
... and throughout the eighteenth Yanktonais and Catholic Missionaries 443 century. Dakota leaders met the Jesuit father Joseph Marest, the “mis- sionary to the Nadouesioux,” near the lower end of Lake Pepin in the late 1680s. Another generation of Dakotas met Father...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2009) 56 (2): 285–302.
Published: 01 April 2009
... occasion where no one was there. An Ojibwa from Sault Ste. Marie, the heartland of early 294 Ivor Miller Ojibwa country, came through there somewhat later. And according to the local Jesuit missionary’s letter, he said, “Don’t bother...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2002) 49 (2): 405–406.
Published: 01 April 2002
... missionary enterprise among a number of northwestern indigenous groups offers a wealth of informa- tion to those able to read knowledgeably and imaginatively enough to sift the Indian ethnographies from the Jesuit worldview...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2002) 49 (2): 407–408.
Published: 01 April 2002
... missionary enterprise among a number of northwestern indigenous groups offers a wealth of informa- tion to those able to read knowledgeably and imaginatively enough to sift the Indian ethnographies from the Jesuit worldview...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2002) 49 (2): 408–411.
Published: 01 April 2002
... missionary enterprise among a number of northwestern indigenous groups offers a wealth of informa- tion to those able to read knowledgeably and imaginatively enough to sift the Indian ethnographies from the Jesuit worldview...