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Indian women

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Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2008) 55 (4): 683–685.
Published: 01 October 2008
... her original intentions in writing this volume. DOI 10.1215/00141801-2008-023 Stealing Indian Women: Native Slavery in the Illinois Country. By Carl J. Ekberg. (Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 2007. xvi + 236 pp., preface, acknowledgments, introduction, illustrations, notes, index...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2019) 66 (2): 387–388.
Published: 01 April 2019
...Robert M. Owens Indigenous Prosperity and American Conquest: Indian Women of the Ohio River Valley, 1690–1792 . By Susan Sleeper-Smith . ( Williamsburg, VA : Omohundro Institute of Early American Culture ; Chapel Hill : University of North Carolina Press , 2018 . xv +348 pp...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2006) 53 (2): 281–329.
Published: 01 April 2006
..., governance, and marriage. As is stressed throughout the essay, masculinity was also juxtaposed with femininity in a number of important ways in Indian society. American Society for Ethnohistory 2006 ‘‘Ranging Foresters’’ and ‘‘Women-Like Men Physical Accomplishment, Spiritual Power, and Indian...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2017) 64 (1): 161–162.
Published: 01 January 2017
...Dawn G. Marsh Weaving Alliances with Other Women: Chitimacha Indian Work in the New South . By Usner Daniel H. . ( Athens : University of Georgia Press , 2015 . ix+110 pp., preface, illustrations, index . $24.95 paper). Copyright 2017 by American Society for Ethnohistory 2017...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2011) 58 (2): 328–329.
Published: 01 April 2011
...Katy Simpson Smith A Nation of Women: Gender and Colonial Encounters among the Delaware Indians . By Fur Gunlög . ( Philadelphia : University of Pennsylvania Press , 2009 . viii + 251 pp., preface, introduction, list of abbreviations, notes, index, acknowledgments . $39.95 cloth...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2015) 62 (4): 707–727.
Published: 01 October 2015
...Ashley Riley Sousa Historians examining relations between Indian women and non-Indian men on the California frontier have focused on the gold rush era and later. These interactions were often violent and degrading to native women and a source of disease, despair, and population decline in Indian...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2018) 65 (3): 349–371.
Published: 01 July 2018
... by the reciprocity embedded in the kin networks of Indian women. Indian women processed the furs, which allowed them to exert pressure on the exchange process, transforming the fur trade into the cloth trade. Women’s access to trade goods enhanced their authority, and their access to cloth led to a flowering...
FIGURES
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2017) 64 (2): 167–189.
Published: 01 April 2017
...: Legacies, Interventions, and Indigenous Sovereignties .” Wicazo Sa Review 24 , no. 2 : 9 – 13 . Green Joyce 2007 Making Space for Indigenous Feminism . Halifax, NS : Fernwood . Green Rayna 1999 “ American Indian Women: Diverse Leadership for Social Change .” In Bridges...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2000) 47 (2): 423–452.
Published: 01 April 2000
... that paralleled and extended those of indigenous society. Their reliance on kinship and Catholicism suggests new ways to study women's involvement in the trade and to reassess how trade and religion affected Indian communities. American Society for Ethnohistory 2000 Women, Kin...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2006) 53 (2): 259–280.
Published: 01 April 2006
..., Spaniard, and black; and (2) bureaucratized beings created in tandem with institutions of state. Conspiracies and confusions were the result as inquisitors, officers in the most modern bureaucracy of the time, intertwined stereotypes of Jews, Indians, African slaves, and women as part of an etiology...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2016) 63 (2): 419–420.
Published: 01 April 2016
... records, family histories, and genealogical information to demonstrate clearly that these Great Lakes Creoles, despite significant intermarriage with and descent from American Indian women, were able to avoid being defined as an ethnic out-group and instead were assimilated as white residents...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2016) 63 (1): 143–166.
Published: 01 January 2016
... the fort lived per- haps ten French soldiers and forty others: French officers, traders, voya- geurs, and families that included Indian and métis members, assisted by a few panis (indigenous slaves). Not far beyond the fort complex, Indian women operated corn-cob smudge pits to tan hides for the fur...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2017) 64 (4): 449–470.
Published: 01 October 2017
... Plains Indian women’s mobility in more detailed terms, moving beyond a narrative about rapid immobilization by documenting previously “hidden” expeditions and by measuring the duration and scale of an indigenous transportation regime. By the early nineteenth century, Mandan, Hidatsa, and Arikara women...
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Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2018) 65 (2): 297–322.
Published: 01 April 2018
... colonial records subjected indigenous women to erasure. When written by Spanish notaries, texts commonly give the impression that Indians were inconsequential to the construction and workings of society. When a Spanish notary in Calimaya drew up a power of attorney for Maria de Caraballo, she charged him...
FIGURES | View All (8)
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2020) 67 (1): 1–28.
Published: 01 January 2020
... , no. 1 : 2 – 9 . Goodykoontz Bill . 1945 . “ Somebody in a Helicopter Should Question the Lady .” Washington Post , 16 December . Green Rayna . 1975 . “ The Pocahontas Perplex: The Image of Indian Women in American Culture .” Massachusetts Review 16 , no. 4 : 698 – 714...
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Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2019) 66 (1): 199–200.
Published: 01 January 2019
... do the challenging work of un-silencing the histories of Delaware and other American Indian women during this period of political, spiritual, and social upheaval, we cannot presume anything. ...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2004) 51 (4): 799–803.
Published: 01 October 2004
...: University of Nebraska Press, 2002. viii + 396 pp., illustrations, map, tables, notes, index. $70.00, £54.00 cloth, $29.95, £22.95 paper.) Indian Women and French Men: Rethinking Cultural Encounter in the Western Great Lakes. By Susan Sleeper-Smith. (Amherst: University of Massachusetts Press, 2001...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2004) 51 (4): 805–809.
Published: 01 October 2004
...: University of Nebraska Press, 2002. viii + 396 pp., illustrations, map, tables, notes, index. $70.00, £54.00 cloth, $29.95, £22.95 paper.) Indian Women and French Men: Rethinking Cultural Encounter in the Western Great Lakes. By Susan Sleeper-Smith. (Amherst: University of Massachusetts Press, 2001...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2002) 49 (4): 885–888.
Published: 01 October 2002
... on disputes among the nuns and their superiors regarding supervision by the secular or regular clergy. The final chapter focuses on the discussion regarding the possible foundation of a convent for noble Indian women...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2014) 61 (1): 204–205.
Published: 01 January 2014
...- tionately directed against Native women, and stories such as Johnson’s “A Red Girl’s Reasoning” and Oskison’s “The Problem of Old Harjo” explore the “administrative violence” (19) of Canada’s Indian Act and US laws against polygamy. In the case of the 1876 Indian Act, for a Native woman to agree...