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Hudson���s Bay Company

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Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2010) 57 (4): 597–624.
Published: 01 October 2010
...-making served to create and reinforce culturally constructed intercommunity identities. These identities proved fluid enough to incorporate sometime rivals (the Crees and Yellowknives) as well as new trading partners (Hudson's Bay Company employees) while still excluding cultural others (the Inuit...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2005) 52 (3): 503–532.
Published: 01 July 2005
.... 2 , The Land Transformed, 1800-1891. R. Louis Gentilcore, ed. Plate 17. Toronto:University of Toronto Press. Morton, Arthur S. 1939 A History of the Canadian West to 1870-71: Being a History of Rupert's Land (the Hudson's Bay Company) and of the North-West Territory (including the Pacific...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2004) 51 (3): 567–607.
Published: 01 July 2004
... of Documents . E. Arthur, ed. Toronto: Champlain Society. 1990 Far from the Madding Crowd: Hudson's Bay Company Managers in the Country North of Superior. Ontario History 82 (1): 9 -27. Barth, Frederick, ed. 1969 Ethnic Groups and Boundaries . Boston: Little, Brown. Belcourt, Tony 2000...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2010) 57 (4): 651–678.
Published: 01 October 2010
.... Hudson's Bay Company 1837–40 Fort Chilcotin Post journal . MS B.37/a/. Hudson's Bay Company Archives (HBCA), Archives of Manitoba. 1839 Census of Indians of Columbia District MS B223/z/1 . HBCA, Archives of Manitoba. Kripke, Saul 1980 Naming and Necessity . Cambridge, MA: Harvard University...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2016) 63 (3): 519–540.
Published: 01 July 2016
...Michael Hughes Abstract By 1815 the Red River Métis were coalescing as a social and political group, asserting their rights to land as an indigenous community. Their opponents, the Hudson’s Bay Company, sought to establish a colony at Red River, while their allies, the North West Company, claimed...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2010) 57 (4): 571–596.
Published: 01 October 2010
...–69; for windigo executions with an ax, see Dahlstrom, “Owls and Cannibals,” 90; Jennifer S. H. Brown, “The Wasitay Religion: Prophecy, Oral Literacy, and Belief on Hudson Bay,” in Reassessing Revitalization: Perspectives from North America and the Pacific Islands, ed. Michael...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2007) 54 (4): 639–668.
Published: 01 October 2007
..., “Allegories of the Atlas,” in Europe and Its Others, vol. 2, ed. Francis Barker, Peter Hulme, Margret Iverson, and Diana Loxely (Colchester, UK, 1985). 4 Charles II granted the newly formed Hudson’s Bay Company title to “the lands and territoryes” of all the “streights, bayes...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2018) 65 (3): 417–440.
Published: 01 July 2018
... to the Crandon Mine in Wisconsin .” Law and Social Inquiry 36 , no. 1 : 151 – 69 . Payne Michael . 2004 . The Fur Trade in Canada: An Illustrated History . Toronto : J. Lorimer . Rogers Edward . 1994 . “ Northern Algonquians and the Hudson’s Bay Company, 1821–1890 .” In Aboriginal...
FIGURES
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2003) 50 (2): 285–314.
Published: 01 April 2003
... into Canada with the fur trade. William Fraser Tolmie, a trader and doctor for the Hudson’s Bay Company in the s, carried Cowper and Watts themselves, or rather their books, on his long sea voyage from Scotland...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2022) 69 (1): 1–27.
Published: 01 January 2022
...; Lytwyn 2002 : 57). Nevertheless, the Monsoni and other Anishinaabe doodemag took the risk and frequently traded at the Hudson’s Bay Company (HBC) factories, as the company’s post journals and account books attest. 8 Anishinaabe oral tradition also reflects the commercial relationship between...
FIGURES
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2002) 49 (4): 789–820.
Published: 01 October 2002
... Serving the Purpose of Education. Harvard Education Review 59 (4): 405 -22. Rae, John 1953 John Rae's Correspondence with the Hudson's Bay Company on Arctic Exploration, 1844-1855 . E. E. Rich and A. M. Johnson, eds. Publications of the Hudson's Bay Record Society, vol. 16 . London: Hudson's Bay...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2015) 62 (4): 707–727.
Published: 01 October 2015
... in Missouri and Santa Fe as well as in tours of Hudson’s Bay Com- pany operations at Fort Vancouver and the Russian American Company’s base at Sitka, these settlers hoped the nascent colony of New Helvetia could prosper as a trade outpost under Sutter’s exclusive rule. Sutter developed alliances...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2006) 53 (3): 445–477.
Published: 01 July 2006
... Angakkuit and Leaders: Parousial Movements among the Inuit of Northeast Canada. Numen 46 : 370 -411. Boas, Franz 1885 Cumberland Sound and Its Eskimos. Popular Science Monthly 27 : 768 -79. 1901 The Eskimo of Baffin Land and Hudson Bay: From Notes Collected by George Comer, James S. Mutch...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2019) 66 (1): 209–210.
Published: 01 January 2019
... by his experiences working for the Hudson Bay Company. Most of the texts are grouped thematically, organized into such topics as dreams, gender, healing, and starvation. Additionally, the collection includes twenty stories about windigos, which Brown suggests is perhaps the largest assemblage of windigo...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2010) 57 (2): 183–199.
Published: 01 April 2010
..., for instance, are known to have grown potatoes as an export crop for both the Russian American Company as well as the Hudson’s Bay Company.13 Recent ethnographic and genetic research, however, suggests that the Native gardens have roots that predate even the earliest-recorded Russian interaction.14...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2018) 65 (4): 679–680.
Published: 01 October 2018
... publication is a welcome and compelling selection of articles (some previously published, some unpublished) that focus on the stories of Cree, Ojibwe and Métis peoples, Hudson’s Bay and Northwest Company fur traders, Methodist and Anglican missionaries, and twentieth-century anthropologists. The articles...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2013) 60 (3): 505–536.
Published: 01 July 2013
...—Missionary, Businessman, Judge, and Governor, 1878–1918 . Oxford, OH : Miami University Press . 1994 The Hoonah's 1862 Seizure of the Hudson's Bay Company Steamer Labouchere—A Mixed Message . Journal of the West 33 : 22 – 27 . 1996 The Canoe Rocks: Alaska's Tlingit and Euramerican Frontier...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2022) 69 (3): 354–355.
Published: 01 July 2022
... centuries, due to the symbiotic evolution of liberalism and negative perceptions of Indigenous peoples within the formation of the Canadian state. Using the Department of Indian Affairs Archives, the Hudson’s Bay Company Archives, Library and Archives Canada, and the National Currency Collection/Bank...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2013) 60 (2): 269–293.
Published: 01 April 2013
... become enemies due to competition for resources; enemies could become friends to resist common foes or agree to a truce for the purpose of trading. In 1772, for example, the Hudson’s Bay Company trader Matthew Cocking wrongly assumed that the Atséna (Gros Ventre) and Tsuu T’ina (Sarcee) were...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2007) 54 (4): 669–695.
Published: 01 October 2007
... as early as 1812, for example.68 Subsequently, other Wahines accompanied their Kanaka hus- bands as Hudson’s Bay Company employees through the 1830s.69 Together with the Nipissing, Iroquois, and others, transplanted indigenous peoples accounted for the earliest colonized families in the Oregon...