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Hispaniola

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Published: 01 October 2016
Figure 2. Map of Hispaniola, showing the Taíno Indian provinces and the locations of the early Spanish settlements (after Vega 1980 ). Drawing by David Kiphuth Figure 2. Map of Hispaniola, showing the Taíno Indian provinces and the locations of the early Spanish settlements (after Vega 1980 More
Image
Published: 01 October 2016
Figure 3. Map of eastern Hispaniola, showing the Taíno Indian provinces and the locations of the early Spanish settlements and outposts (after Deagan 1992 ). Drawing by Jennifer Steffey Figure 3. Map of eastern Hispaniola, showing the Taíno Indian provinces and the locations of the early More
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2016) 63 (4): 671–695.
Published: 01 October 2016
...Figure 2. Map of Hispaniola, showing the Taíno Indian provinces and the locations of the early Spanish settlements (after Vega 1980 ). Drawing by David Kiphuth Figure 2. Map of Hispaniola, showing the Taíno Indian provinces and the locations of the early Spanish settlements (after Vega 1980...
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Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2006) 53 (2): 383–392.
Published: 01 April 2006
... Curet uses to sup- port his interpretation of the ethnohistoric accounts, is irrelevant. I con- clude that the reexamination of evidence for chiefly succession indicates that the protohistoric chiefdoms of Hispaniola were founded on matrilineal principles. Ethnohistoric Descriptions of Chiefly...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2002) 49 (2): 259–280.
Published: 01 April 2002
... Press. Anderson-Córdova, K. 1990 Hispaniola and Puerto Rico: Indian Acculturation and Heterogeneity, 1492 -1550. Ph.D. diss. , Yale University. Burling, R. 1974 The Passage of Power: Studies in Political Succession . New York: Academic. Carneiro, R. L. 1991 The Nature of the Chiefdom...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2014) 61 (3): 467–495.
Published: 01 July 2014
... Puertorriqueña and Universidad Interamericana de Puerto Rico . Anderson Córdova K. F. 1990 Hispaniola and Puerto Rico: Indian Acculturation and Heterogeneity , 1492 – 1550 . PhD diss. , Yale University . Arrom Juan J. 1975 Mitología y artes prehispánicas de las Antillas . Mexico...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2017) 64 (2): 217–239.
Published: 01 April 2017
...). González’s role in the conquest of San Juan was significant. We learn that he was chosen by the governor of Hispaniola, Nicolás de Ovando, to escort Juan Ponce de León in 1506 on the first large-scale venture to the island of San Juan. Because of his “proficiency” in speaking the language of the natives...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2015) 62 (1): 1–15.
Published: 01 January 2015
... Guide 58 : 147 – 84 . Oliver José R. 2009 Caciques and Cemí Idols: The Web Spun by Taíno Rulers between Hispaniola and Puerto Rico . Tuscaloosa : University of Alabama Press . Petitjean Roget Henry 2013 A la recherché des paroles perdues: Essai d'interpretation des mots...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2001) 48 (3): 547–550.
Published: 01 July 2001
... An Account of the An- tiquities of the Indians. A self-described ‘‘humble friar’’ of the Order of Saint Jerome, Pané lived for several years among the natives whom Columbus and his entourage encountered on the island of Hispaniola. As Arrom de- scribes the textual result in his introduction...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2006) 53 (2): 393–398.
Published: 01 April 2006
... chronicles gathered mainly in Hispaniola to describe groups from other regions or islands. There are two problems with this normative practice. First, it assumes ‘‘perfect’’ cul- tural homogeneity in most of the Greater Antilles, the Bahamas, and some of the Lesser Antilles. This ignores the clear...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2015) 62 (1): 17–38.
Published: 01 January 2015
... frequented by modern sailors as “these great islands—­America, Paria, Cuba, Hispaniola, Cipango, Francisca [sic] and many others—­which were totally unknown to the Ancients.”5 Much as an island is characterized by its disjunction from the famil- iarity and the security of the Old World, absence...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2021) 68 (3): 363–383.
Published: 01 July 2021
..., and Cultural Transformation in Hispaniola and Puerto Rico . Tuscaloosa : University of Alabama Press . Anglería Pedro Mártir de . 1989 . Décadas del Nuevo Mundo. Madrid : Ediciones Polifemo . Badillo Jalil Sued . 2007 . “ Guadalupe: ¿Caribe o Taina? La isla de Guadalupe y su...
FIGURES
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2014) 61 (2): 357–360.
Published: 01 April 2014
....” First of all, we see that the mere outline of Hispaniola’s northern coast first drawn by Columbus has now been completed so that it and other Carib- bean Islands can be seen to be what they are: islands. Here the recently dis- covered shore of South America appears for the first time, and like Colum...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2006) 53 (2): 409–418.
Published: 01 April 2006
... supplies a view from the ground up (literally) of Columbus’s attempt to establish a factoría or trading colony on Hispaniola. They argue that the life conditions, local social processes, and experiences of individuals who lived at La Isabela largely explain the colony’s failure. Moreover, the ways...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2006) 53 (2): 419–431.
Published: 01 April 2006
... supplies a view from the ground up (literally) of Columbus’s attempt to establish a factoría or trading colony on Hispaniola. They argue that the life conditions, local social processes, and experiences of individuals who lived at La Isabela largely explain the colony’s failure. Moreover, the ways...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2006) 53 (2): 433–438.
Published: 01 April 2006
... supplies a view from the ground up (literally) of Columbus’s attempt to establish a factoría or trading colony on Hispaniola. They argue that the life conditions, local social processes, and experiences of individuals who lived at La Isabela largely explain the colony’s failure. Moreover, the ways...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2008) 55 (3): 393–415.
Published: 01 July 2008
... 399 Period I—if they existed at all—were probably hunters and fishermen, like the Ciboney Indians of Hispaniola and Cuba. They can be assumed to have entered Porto Rico from Hispaniola, settling only in the parts of the coastal area in which conditions were best suited to their mode of life...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2017) 64 (1): 41–63.
Published: 01 January 2017
... fiercest enemies, the often romanticized buccaneers. Around 1630, when English, French, and Dutch adventurers established their first colonies in the Caribbean, the tiny island of Tortuga, along with the northwest coast of nearby Hispaniola, became a lawless frontier zone where outcasts from several...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2017) 64 (1): 65–90.
Published: 01 January 2017
... tropes about natives as unsuitable laborers. This tradition had begun with Bartolomé de las Casas, who wrote that the Arawak people of Hispaniola were “unable to withstand hard work or suffering and render them liable to succumb to almost any illness.” 24 By the seventeenth century, Carib...
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Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2005) 52 (4): 689–726.
Published: 01 October 2005
... 1493, while on the island of Hispaniola, Columbus (1960: 140) learned that ‘‘toward the east there was an island where there were women only1 By 13 January he had identified the island as Matininó— modern Martinique—and a few days later he added that ‘‘at certain time...