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Guaran��

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Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2006) 53 (4): 689–714.
Published: 01 October 2006
...-Guaraní sociopolitical models demonstrates a process of “Guaranization” that has influenced scholars as much as—if not more than—the Chiriguano themselves. By means of an ethnohistorical analysis of the Chiriguano political system, we attempt to recover the Arawakan heritage of this truly mestizo society...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2013) 60 (1): 101–124.
Published: 01 January 2013
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2007) 54 (2): 245–272.
Published: 01 April 2007
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2001) 48 (1-2): 157–170.
Published: 01 April 2001
... European powers of the period, to have resupply ports of call to guaran- tee possibilities of traffic with the East Indies. According to oral traditions, these traffickers are considered renetane (first occupants): rene, mother...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2013) 60 (2): 269–293.
Published: 01 April 2013
..., for in 1855 the United States had no means to enforce them. Rather, the commissioners, who recognized the authority of one leader above all others for each First Nation, expected these leaders to guaran- tee compliance by their followers. Lame Bull signed as supreme Blackfoot chief, and the treaty...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2005) 52 (1): 207–209.
Published: 01 January 2005
...- tices through the end of the colonial period. ‘‘These native people Ganson concludes, ‘‘had become Christian, but they remained Guaran even after the wars of Latin American independence signaled the final demise off the mission system (187). While Ganson herself admits that her sources cannot...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2005) 52 (1): 209–210.
Published: 01 January 2005
...- tices through the end of the colonial period. ‘‘These native people Ganson concludes, ‘‘had become Christian, but they remained Guaran even after the wars of Latin American independence signaled the final demise off the mission system (187). While Ganson herself admits that her sources cannot...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2005) 52 (1): 211–212.
Published: 01 January 2005
...- tices through the end of the colonial period. ‘‘These native people Ganson concludes, ‘‘had become Christian, but they remained Guaran even after the wars of Latin American independence signaled the final demise off the mission system (187). While Ganson herself admits that her sources cannot...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2005) 52 (1): 212–213.
Published: 01 January 2005
... of accommoda- tion and daily forms of resistance allowed the Guaraní to preserve thirty established villages, where they retained many traditional beliefs and prac- tices through the end of the colonial period. ‘‘These native people Ganson concludes, ‘‘had become Christian, but they remained Guaran even...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2005) 52 (1): 214–216.
Published: 01 January 2005
...- tices through the end of the colonial period. ‘‘These native people Ganson concludes, ‘‘had become Christian, but they remained Guaran even after the wars of Latin American independence signaled the final demise off the mission system (187). While Ganson herself admits that her sources cannot...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2005) 52 (1): 216–218.
Published: 01 January 2005
...- tices through the end of the colonial period. ‘‘These native people Ganson concludes, ‘‘had become Christian, but they remained Guaran even after the wars of Latin American independence signaled the final demise off the mission system (187). While Ganson herself admits that her sources cannot...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2005) 52 (1): 218–219.
Published: 01 January 2005
... of accommoda- tion and daily forms of resistance allowed the Guaraní to preserve thirty established villages, where they retained many traditional beliefs and prac- tices through the end of the colonial period. ‘‘These native people Ganson concludes, ‘‘had become Christian, but they remained Guaran even...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2005) 52 (1): 219–221.
Published: 01 January 2005
...- tices through the end of the colonial period. ‘‘These native people Ganson concludes, ‘‘had become Christian, but they remained Guaran even after the wars of Latin American independence signaled the final demise off the mission system (187). While Ganson herself admits that her sources cannot...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2005) 52 (1): 221–223.
Published: 01 January 2005
... allowed the Guaraní to preserve thirty established villages, where they retained many traditional beliefs and prac- tices through the end of the colonial period. ‘‘These native people Ganson concludes, ‘‘had become Christian, but they remained Guaran even after the wars of Latin American independence...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2005) 52 (1): 223–225.
Published: 01 January 2005
... of accommoda- tion and daily forms of resistance allowed the Guaraní to preserve thirty established villages, where they retained many traditional beliefs and prac- tices through the end of the colonial period. ‘‘These native people Ganson concludes, ‘‘had become Christian, but they remained Guaran even...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2005) 52 (1): 226–228.
Published: 01 January 2005
... of accommoda- tion and daily forms of resistance allowed the Guaraní to preserve thirty established villages, where they retained many traditional beliefs and prac- tices through the end of the colonial period. ‘‘These native people Ganson concludes, ‘‘had become Christian, but they remained Guaran even...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2005) 52 (1): 228–229.
Published: 01 January 2005
...- tices through the end of the colonial period. ‘‘These native people Ganson concludes, ‘‘had become Christian, but they remained Guaran even after the wars of Latin American independence signaled the final demise off the mission system (187). While Ganson herself admits that her sources cannot...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2005) 52 (1): 229–231.
Published: 01 January 2005
...- tices through the end of the colonial period. ‘‘These native people Ganson concludes, ‘‘had become Christian, but they remained Guaran even after the wars of Latin American independence signaled the final demise off the mission system (187). While Ganson herself admits that her sources cannot...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2005) 52 (1): 231–232.
Published: 01 January 2005
...- tices through the end of the colonial period. ‘‘These native people Ganson concludes, ‘‘had become Christian, but they remained Guaran even after the wars of Latin American independence signaled the final demise off the mission system (187). While Ganson herself admits that her sources cannot...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2005) 52 (1): 233–235.
Published: 01 January 2005
... of accommoda- tion and daily forms of resistance allowed the Guaraní to preserve thirty established villages, where they retained many traditional beliefs and prac- tices through the end of the colonial period. ‘‘These native people Ganson concludes, ‘‘had become Christian, but they remained Guaran even...