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Galibi

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Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2018) 65 (4): 597–620.
Published: 01 October 2018
..., Palikur, and Galibi. Rather than a refuge zone, this space remained central to Amerindian life and to the upholding of indigenous autonomy due to the maintenance of inter- and intra-ethnic connections and the regular use of routes across this space. Copyright 2018 by American Society for Ethnohistory...
FIGURES
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2004) 51 (2): 257–291.
Published: 01 April 2004
... to be a key Arawakan trait (Hill and Santos-Granero 2002; Hill 2002; Zuc- chi 2002). The name Palikur was, according to Dreyfus (1981: 302), bestowed on them by their neighbors on the Kwip and Wassa: the Karipún(a); the Galibi, a branch of the Karinya/Kaliña of the northern and western Guianas...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2021) 68 (3): 452–454.
Published: 01 July 2021
... events during the earliest French-Indigenous contacts, Carayon concludes that full sign languages were likely possessed by the Galibi of Guiana and the Wendat (Huron) and Mi’kmaq of Canada; analyses of Tupí-Guaraní and Taíno signing are inconclusive. Scholars should note that Carayon’s broad scope does...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2009) 56 (1): 163–185.
Published: 01 January 2009
... several hundred kilometers of coastline, while earlier sections of the epic describe details of particular islands, riverbends, and small streams over a scale of some ten kilometers. Story maps are also present in many renderings of the story of the war between the Galibi and the Palikur...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2005) 52 (1): 207–209.
Published: 01 January 2005
... linguis- tic diversity. For the later colonial era, Lieve Jooken examines European conceptions of three polysynthetic languages, Galibi (Caribbean region), Mapuche (Chile), and Greenlandic (Eskimo). Rüdiger Schreyer provides a fitting conclusion as he explores the coexistence of rival theories...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2005) 52 (1): 209–210.
Published: 01 January 2005
... linguis- tic diversity. For the later colonial era, Lieve Jooken examines European conceptions of three polysynthetic languages, Galibi (Caribbean region), Mapuche (Chile), and Greenlandic (Eskimo). Rüdiger Schreyer provides a fitting conclusion as he explores the coexistence of rival theories...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2005) 52 (1): 211–212.
Published: 01 January 2005
... linguis- tic diversity. For the later colonial era, Lieve Jooken examines European conceptions of three polysynthetic languages, Galibi (Caribbean region), Mapuche (Chile), and Greenlandic (Eskimo). Rüdiger Schreyer provides a fitting conclusion as he explores the coexistence of rival theories...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2005) 52 (1): 212–213.
Published: 01 January 2005
... linguis- tic diversity. For the later colonial era, Lieve Jooken examines European conceptions of three polysynthetic languages, Galibi (Caribbean region), Mapuche (Chile), and Greenlandic (Eskimo). Rüdiger Schreyer provides a fitting conclusion as he explores the coexistence of rival theories...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2005) 52 (1): 214–216.
Published: 01 January 2005
... linguis- tic diversity. For the later colonial era, Lieve Jooken examines European conceptions of three polysynthetic languages, Galibi (Caribbean region), Mapuche (Chile), and Greenlandic (Eskimo). Rüdiger Schreyer provides a fitting conclusion as he explores the coexistence of rival theories...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2005) 52 (1): 216–218.
Published: 01 January 2005
... linguis- tic diversity. For the later colonial era, Lieve Jooken examines European conceptions of three polysynthetic languages, Galibi (Caribbean region), Mapuche (Chile), and Greenlandic (Eskimo). Rüdiger Schreyer provides a fitting conclusion as he explores the coexistence of rival theories...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2005) 52 (1): 218–219.
Published: 01 January 2005
... linguis- tic diversity. For the later colonial era, Lieve Jooken examines European conceptions of three polysynthetic languages, Galibi (Caribbean region), Mapuche (Chile), and Greenlandic (Eskimo). Rüdiger Schreyer provides a fitting conclusion as he explores the coexistence of rival theories...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2005) 52 (1): 219–221.
Published: 01 January 2005
... linguis- tic diversity. For the later colonial era, Lieve Jooken examines European conceptions of three polysynthetic languages, Galibi (Caribbean region), Mapuche (Chile), and Greenlandic (Eskimo). Rüdiger Schreyer provides a fitting conclusion as he explores the coexistence of rival theories...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2005) 52 (1): 221–223.
Published: 01 January 2005
... of three polysynthetic languages, Galibi (Caribbean region), Mapuche (Chile), and Greenlandic (Eskimo). Rüdiger Schreyer provides a fitting conclusion as he explores the coexistence of rival theories that emerged to account for American linguistic complexity. He highlights the strengths and limitations...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2005) 52 (1): 223–225.
Published: 01 January 2005
... linguis- tic diversity. For the later colonial era, Lieve Jooken examines European conceptions of three polysynthetic languages, Galibi (Caribbean region), Mapuche (Chile), and Greenlandic (Eskimo). Rüdiger Schreyer provides a fitting conclusion as he explores the coexistence of rival theories...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2005) 52 (1): 226–228.
Published: 01 January 2005
... linguis- tic diversity. For the later colonial era, Lieve Jooken examines European conceptions of three polysynthetic languages, Galibi (Caribbean region), Mapuche (Chile), and Greenlandic (Eskimo). Rüdiger Schreyer provides a fitting conclusion as he explores the coexistence of rival theories...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2005) 52 (1): 228–229.
Published: 01 January 2005
... linguis- tic diversity. For the later colonial era, Lieve Jooken examines European conceptions of three polysynthetic languages, Galibi (Caribbean region), Mapuche (Chile), and Greenlandic (Eskimo). Rüdiger Schreyer provides a fitting conclusion as he explores the coexistence of rival theories...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2005) 52 (1): 229–231.
Published: 01 January 2005
... linguis- tic diversity. For the later colonial era, Lieve Jooken examines European conceptions of three polysynthetic languages, Galibi (Caribbean region), Mapuche (Chile), and Greenlandic (Eskimo). Rüdiger Schreyer provides a fitting conclusion as he explores the coexistence of rival theories...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2005) 52 (1): 231–232.
Published: 01 January 2005
... linguis- tic diversity. For the later colonial era, Lieve Jooken examines European conceptions of three polysynthetic languages, Galibi (Caribbean region), Mapuche (Chile), and Greenlandic (Eskimo). Rüdiger Schreyer provides a fitting conclusion as he explores the coexistence of rival theories...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2005) 52 (1): 233–235.
Published: 01 January 2005
... linguis- tic diversity. For the later colonial era, Lieve Jooken examines European conceptions of three polysynthetic languages, Galibi (Caribbean region), Mapuche (Chile), and Greenlandic (Eskimo). Rüdiger Schreyer provides a fitting conclusion as he explores the coexistence of rival theories...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2005) 52 (1): 235–237.
Published: 01 January 2005
... linguis- tic diversity. For the later colonial era, Lieve Jooken examines European conceptions of three polysynthetic languages, Galibi (Caribbean region), Mapuche (Chile), and Greenlandic (Eskimo). Rüdiger Schreyer provides a fitting conclusion as he explores the coexistence of rival theories...