1-20 of 56 Search Results for

French Guiana

Follow your search
Access your saved searches in your account

Would you like to receive an alert when new items match your search?
Close Modal
Sort by
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2018) 65 (4): 597–620.
Published: 01 October 2018
...Silvia Espelt-Bombin Abstract This article focuses on the geographical space between the Amazon delta and the Maroni River (nowadays Brazilian Amapá and French Guiana) in 1600–1730. An imperial frontier between France and Portugal South American possessions, it has been conceptualized as a refuge...
FIGURES
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2004) 51 (2): 257–291.
Published: 01 April 2004
...Alan Passes The article focuses on the process of naoné —nationhood—of the Palikur, a Native American people of northern Brazil and southern French Guiana, from 1500 onward. It is described how, in counteraction to colonial expansion, a corpus of preexisting clans combined with diverse other...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2009) 56 (1): 163–185.
Published: 01 January 2009
.... Passes, Alan 1998 The Hunter, the Hearer, and the Agouti Head: Aspects of Intercommunication and Conviviality among the Pa'ikwené (Palikur) of French Guiana . PhD diss., University of St. Andrews. 2004 The Gathering of the Clans: The Making of the Palikur Naoné. Ethnohistory 51 : 257 -88...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2006) 53 (3): 507–542.
Published: 01 July 2006
... with the West, has affected these proto-Wayana. There are today some fourteen hundred Wayana, of whom two-thirds live in French Guiana, on the upper Maroni, the remaining population being divided between the upper East Paru River in Brazil, and the Paloe- meu and Tapanahoni rivers in Suriname. Hunters...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2018) 65 (4): 537–547.
Published: 01 October 2018
... challenges the definition of the current Brazilian state of Amapá and eastern French Guiana as an Amerindian refuge zone due to its frontier status between the Portuguese and French colonies in the early modern period. Reconstructing indigenous networks made up of trade, rituals, war, alliances...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2000) 47 (3-4): 611–634.
Published: 01 October 2000
... and bounded by the Orinoco, Negro, and Amazon Rivers. Today the term Guiana or Guianas is used to refer to the British, Dutch, and French Guianas, collectively, even though the first two are now known as Guyana and Surinam, respectively, since their independence.  El Callao is the only other...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2017) 64 (1): 65–90.
Published: 01 January 2017
..., and as soon as the unsuspecting Indians were loaded, they would lift anchor and take men, women, and children to their colonies. 36 Additionally, both the English and the French bought both Aroüages and Brasiliens from Dutch traders in Guiana, who had purchased them as war captives from Caribs...
FIGURES
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2000) 47 (2): 399–422.
Published: 01 April 2000
..., and painful but still a distant sec- ond in discomfort from the sting of the dreaded, lesser giant hunter ants, Paraponera clavata. Remarkably, the Wayãpi of French Guiana also apply the same ants...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2002) 49 (1): 3–40.
Published: 01 January 2002
... by the Portuguese. A recent French expedition would probably complete the geography of la Guianne, and only the British section of the Guianas remained blank. The interior also promised a bo- tanical treasury where an explorer could...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2006) 53 (3): 543–566.
Published: 01 July 2006
... of the manioc plant. In the French islands, the Carib called their drink oüicou. However, early settlers in the British colony of Barbados called the Carib’s cassava-based alcoholic drinks perino or parranow.5 Does the different name for a cassava-based alcoholic drink in Barba- dos reflect linguistic...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2017) 64 (1): 1–17.
Published: 01 January 2017
... laborers were not only shipped to Barbados from Dutch Guiana but also from New England, and dispersed Mayas supplemented the labor force in French and English colonies. The various economic functions that enslaved Native Americans fulfilled also become clear. Indigenous slaves were plantation laborers...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2011) 58 (3): 525–532.
Published: 01 July 2011
..., includes not only the three Guianas (Guyana, Suriname, and Guyane) but also adjacent areas of Venezuela south of the Orinoco and Brazil north of the Amazon. Whitehead’s introductory essay, “Guayana as Anthropological Imaginary: Elements of a History,” is a beautifully written...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2005) 52 (4): 689–726.
Published: 01 October 2005
..., namely, at the mountains in the heart of Guiana, a region which neither the Portuguese of Pará nor the French of Cayenne have yet penetrated’’ (La Condamine 1921 [1745]: 71). This was the region signaled by Acuña and Carvajal, which, appro- priately, remained unexplored. Furthermore, La Condamine...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2000) 47 (3-4): 581–609.
Published: 01 October 2000
... located in an ethnic and politi- cal frontier between the Amerindian world and the emerging colonies. The mainland Carib lived in an optimal geographical position, at the mouths of the fluvial systems along the Atlantic coast of the Guianas, where the French, English, and Dutch settled, building...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2021) 68 (3): 452–454.
Published: 01 July 2021
... events during the earliest French-Indigenous contacts, Carayon concludes that full sign languages were likely possessed by the Galibi of Guiana and the Wendat (Huron) and Mi’kmaq of Canada; analyses of Tupí-Guaraní and Taíno signing are inconclusive. Scholars should note that Carayon’s broad scope does...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2006) 53 (3): 618–620.
Published: 01 July 2006
...) panregional polity in French Guiana, which involves both a literal and a symbolic central space characteristic of the Arawak matrix. Part 3 addresses power, cultism, and sacred landscapes. Alberta Zuc- chi combines linguistic, archaeological, ethnographic, mythic, and histori- cal data, constructing...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2006) 53 (3): 620–621.
Published: 01 July 2006
... with both other indigenous South American groups and Westerners. Alan Passes explores the role of interethnic and Western relations in the development of the Pa’ikwené (Palikur) panregional polity in French Guiana, which involves both a literal and a symbolic central space characteristic of the Arawak...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2006) 53 (3): 622–623.
Published: 01 July 2006
... of the Pa’ikwené (Palikur) panregional polity in French Guiana, which involves both a literal and a symbolic central space characteristic of the Arawak matrix. Part 3 addresses power, cultism, and sacred landscapes. Alberta Zuc- chi combines linguistic, archaeological, ethnographic, mythic, and histori...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2006) 53 (3): 623–625.
Published: 01 July 2006
...) panregional polity in French Guiana, which involves both a literal and a symbolic central space characteristic of the Arawak matrix. Part 3 addresses power, cultism, and sacred landscapes. Alberta Zuc- chi combines linguistic, archaeological, ethnographic, mythic, and histori- cal data, constructing...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2006) 53 (3): 625–628.
Published: 01 July 2006
... the role of interethnic and Western relations in the development of the Pa’ikwené (Palikur) panregional polity in French Guiana, which involves both a literal and a symbolic central space characteristic of the Arawak matrix. Part 3 addresses power, cultism, and sacred landscapes. Alberta Zuc- chi...