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Chichimecs

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Published: 01 October 2021
Figure 9. Nopaltzin at Xiuhtepec (9a). 9b. Xolotl with a Chichimec with tepotzohtli (kyphosis, spinal curvature) glyph. 9c. Xolotl and Nopaltzin observe Toltecs at Totolapan; note four blue disks indicating a duration of four years. 9d. Xolotl and Zacatitechcochtli at Cuauhtlixco. X.011. © More
Image
Published: 01 October 2021
Figure 4. Chichimec founding at a site later named Coatlichan. The date 1 Tecpatl is shown along with a wife with a stone glyph in Toltec attire and an unnamed Chichimec husband (eyeball, Tzontecoma in alphabetic sources), with an Acolhua glyph above. Huetzin is shown as a grandson More
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2021) 68 (4): 455–491.
Published: 01 October 2021
...Figure 9. Nopaltzin at Xiuhtepec (9a). 9b. Xolotl with a Chichimec with tepotzohtli (kyphosis, spinal curvature) glyph. 9c. Xolotl and Nopaltzin observe Toltecs at Totolapan; note four blue disks indicating a duration of four years. 9d. Xolotl and Zacatitechcochtli at Cuauhtlixco. X.011. ©...
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Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2012) 59 (1): 109–139.
Published: 01 January 2012
.... This article offers a partial explanation for the development of Tlaxcalan-Chichimec pueblos and a general set of principles for understanding intercultural diplomacy in frontier environments. Copyright 2012 by American Society for Ethnohistory 2012 A Sleeping Army: The Military Origins of Interethnic...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2019) 66 (1): 95–116.
Published: 01 January 2019
... northern peoples known as Chichimecs. Historians have cast them as eager volunteers and interpreted the campaign as another example of Tlaxcala’s distinguished colonial service. However, records written by Tlaxcalans in their own language (Nahuatl) reveal that the mission met a furious resistance...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2011) 58 (2): 263–291.
Published: 01 April 2011
..., Part 1 . Cline Howard F. Wauchope Robert , eds. Pp. 279 – 305 . Austin : University of Texas Press . Hrdlicka Ales 1903 The Region of the Ancient “Chichimecs,” with Notes on the Tepecanos and the Ruin of La Quemada Mexico . American Anthropologist 5 : 385 – 440 . 1908...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2009) 56 (1): 125–161.
Published: 01 January 2009
... their migration before settling in the Valley of Mexico. It seems probable that Otontecuhtli was taken as the patron god once Coyoacan was founded, and consequentially, it was important to incorporate him into the shield’s iconography. The deity is represented here to show the Chichimec origin...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2022) 69 (2): 163–195.
Published: 01 April 2022
... of which is in flames. The foreground shows the foot of a deer, with a precious stone on a thread on top of it, accompanied by several feathers, likely of various colors. Martínez Baracs suggests that the image of the hill was meant to recreate the rugged landscape where the Chichimecs lived, represented...
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Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2017) 64 (1): 19–40.
Published: 01 January 2017
... frontiers often characterized the Natives as especially barbarous and developed tropes to justify their enslavement: in the Philippines certain peoples were branded as dangerous “Mohammedans”; in northern Mexico and southern Chile settlers emphasized the extraordinary ferocity of Chichimecs and Mapuches...
FIGURES
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2013) 60 (4): 637–662.
Published: 01 October 2013
... device for explaining the Uacúsecha as an entity composed of both the “Islander” and “Chichimec” elementary categories. This is a final expression of the process manifested by the entire narrative (Haskell 2008a) of producing the Uacúsecha as a sociocosmic totality composed of both categories...
Image
Published: 01 October 2021
Figure 7. Infrared imaging detail of X.011 enhances two speech scrolls above the right-facing eagle (cuāuhtli) between Xolotl and fellow Chichimec at Cuauhnahuac (7a). Dibble mistakenly identifies the Chichimec as Ocotoch, does note the speech scrolls, but misidentifies the bird as a turkey More
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2012) 59 (4): 675–690.
Published: 01 October 2012
... languages while tending to ignore languages with fewer speakers. In the 1569 census of parishes, the vast majority of priests and friars reported being able to speak either Nahuatl or Otomi. Nevertheless, there were some other languages represented. Among these one finds Chichimec, Tepehua...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2023) 70 (4): 517–548.
Published: 01 October 2023
... one—because they left the less politically valued territory in the Anahuac Valley. They could have sought better lands to settle and follow the same way that the Seven Chichimec Tribes took to the northeast, since their next stop, Cuexteca Ichocayan and Coatl Ycamac, could have been in the Huaxteca...
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Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2011) 58 (4): 653–682.
Published: 01 October 2011
...- tian, Hispanized state On one level, the battle scenes communicate a Christian message of moral struggle between the forces of good and evil, and on another, they depict an episode in the Chichimec wars (1569–72), showing the Christianized and civilized Otomís, wearing elaborate warrior dress...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2001) 48 (4): 723–724.
Published: 01 October 2001
... and creativity of Purhépecha-Chichimec culture during the consolidation of colonial rule in Michoacán. Verastique also succeeds in moving beyond hagiographic descriptions of Vasco de Quiroga to pro- vide a nuanced portrait...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2001) 48 (4): 725–726.
Published: 01 October 2001
... and creativity of Purhépecha-Chichimec culture during the consolidation of colonial rule in Michoacán. Verastique also succeeds in moving beyond hagiographic descriptions of Vasco de Quiroga to pro- vide a nuanced portrait...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2001) 48 (4): 726–728.
Published: 01 October 2001
... and creativity of Purhépecha-Chichimec culture during the consolidation of colonial rule in Michoacán. Verastique also succeeds in moving beyond hagiographic descriptions of Vasco de Quiroga to pro- vide a nuanced portrait...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2001) 48 (4): 728–730.
Published: 01 October 2001
... and creativity of Purhépecha-Chichimec culture during the consolidation of colonial rule in Michoacán. Verastique also succeeds in moving beyond hagiographic descriptions of Vasco de Quiroga to pro- vide a nuanced portrait...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2001) 48 (4): 730–732.
Published: 01 October 2001
... and creativity of Purhépecha-Chichimec culture during the consolidation of colonial rule in Michoacán. Verastique also succeeds in moving beyond hagiographic descriptions of Vasco de Quiroga to pro- vide a nuanced portrait...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2001) 48 (4): 732–735.
Published: 01 October 2001
... and creativity of Purhépecha-Chichimec culture during the consolidation of colonial rule in Michoacán. Verastique also succeeds in moving beyond hagiographic descriptions of Vasco de Quiroga to pro- vide a nuanced portrait...