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Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2022) 69 (1): 101–108.
Published: 01 January 2022
...Jajuan Johnson Context The oral history interview with Mr. Elmer Beard, a longtime political activist, politician, and educator, is part of a series of interviews for a study on Black church burnings, arsons, and vandalism from 2008 to 2016. Mr. Beard gives historical context to recent Black church...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2014) 61 (1): 79–98.
Published: 01 January 2014
... this time there was an Ojibwe named John Hall who joined and became a missionary in the African Methodist Episcopal (AME) Church, a historically significant black denomination. Hall felt camaraderie with blacks because, like Indians, they had endured oppression at the hands of whites. Also, he felt bonded...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2008) 55 (3): 439–464.
Published: 01 July 2008
.... Loras depicted Dakotas as “clamoring for black robes as if they had been abandoned only the day before,” but he also had to admit that they “had nearly forgotten the doctrines of Christianity” taught to them by previous missionaries. Even Ravoux, who served the longest of Catholic missionar- ies...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2000) 47 (1): 133–169.
Published: 01 January 2000
... about what to expect. They hear many rumors suggesting that something momentous and probably terrible will take place. But the scenarios predicted are diverse. Many rumors have the form of questions such as, Will black skins...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2006) 53 (1): 243–245.
Published: 01 January 2006
..., and religious structures of traditional Cherokee society began. Minges highlights the role of the mis- sionaries of the Christian churches in this alteration, as well as that of blacks in the missions among tribes. He explains the success of these reli- gious missions, stressing the affinities between Baptist...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2006) 53 (1): 245–246.
Published: 01 January 2006
..., and religious structures of traditional Cherokee society began. Minges highlights the role of the mis- sionaries of the Christian churches in this alteration, as well as that of blacks in the missions among tribes. He explains the success of these reli- gious missions, stressing the affinities between Baptist...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2006) 53 (1): 246–248.
Published: 01 January 2006
...’’ program of the gov- ernment, the alteration of the social, political, and religious structures of traditional Cherokee society began. Minges highlights the role of the mis- sionaries of the Christian churches in this alteration, as well as that of blacks in the missions among tribes. He explains...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2006) 53 (1): 248–251.
Published: 01 January 2006
... progressives, and the Keetoowah Society, seen as dedicated traditionalists. Minges deals in depth with the unfolding of the Civil War in Indian territory, underlin- ing the roles played by Cherokee Unionists and Confederates, blacks, and the various Christian churches. When peace returned after several...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2006) 53 (1): 251–253.
Published: 01 January 2006
..., and religious structures of traditional Cherokee society began. Minges highlights the role of the mis- sionaries of the Christian churches in this alteration, as well as that of blacks in the missions among tribes. He explains the success of these reli- gious missions, stressing the affinities between Baptist...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2006) 53 (1): 253–255.
Published: 01 January 2006
... progressives, and the Keetoowah Society, seen as dedicated traditionalists. Minges deals in depth with the unfolding of the Civil War in Indian territory, underlin- ing the roles played by Cherokee Unionists and Confederates, blacks, and the various Christian churches. When peace returned after several...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2006) 53 (1): 256–258.
Published: 01 January 2006
... of the Christian churches in this alteration, as well as that of blacks in the missions among tribes. He explains the success of these reli- gious missions, stressing the affinities between Baptist liturgical practices and the traditional religious Cherokee rituals, and showing how the Free- 246...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2006) 53 (2): 259–280.
Published: 01 April 2006
..., Spaniard, and black; and (2) bureaucratized beings created in tandem with institutions of state. Conspiracies and confusions were the result as inquisitors, officers in the most modern bureaucracy of the time, intertwined stereotypes of Jews, Indians, African slaves, and women as part of an etiology...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2007) 54 (1): 129–157.
Published: 01 January 2007
... was given a whipping and condemned to six years of forced labor.13 In his essay on Juan de La Vega and a seventeenth-century Mexican “wave of repressions” against “homosexual” men,14 the historian Serge Gruzinski notes that in contrast to New Spain’s Indians, Jews, blacks, and women, such men...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2014) 61 (2): 277–299.
Published: 01 April 2014
... and on to the Pacific Coast. An ocelot enclosed in an inverted bell-­shaped hill appears in the bottom sec- tion of the map, representing Cuquila’s place-­name, the town of the ocelot. The church, temple, and hill include a black-and-­ ­white decorative frieze running along the bottom of each structure...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2002) 49 (3): 545–582.
Published: 01 July 2002
... Ecuador . N. E. Whitten Jr.,ed. Pp. 677 -704. Urbana: University of Illinois Press. Infidels, Virgins, and the Black-Robed Priest: A Backwoods History of Ecuador’s Montaña Region Eduardo O. Kohn...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2013) 60 (1): 27–50.
Published: 01 January 2013
... was about half Indian and half white, had at one time a white woman (for, I believe he was never married), after that a full-­blooded squaw, and finally, a full-­blooded negress”—might even have been a reference to William Apes, but only if Avery had reversed the order of the wives to Indian, black...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2020) 67 (1): 149–173.
Published: 01 January 2020
... to the enslaved of Peru. She spread the word in the valley, but paid a price and was martyred. My interlocutor added, “and, the blacks fled and they were sought by the authorities, because in that time there were abuses too, right?” 4 Although she was not relaying a ghost story, her specific association...
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Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2005) 52 (1): 47–80.
Published: 01 January 2005
... black Melanesian god who is expected to be Dakoa. The New Heaven will be this forthcoming union of god and king, of love and gold. In weekly church services, Dakoa will preach that ‘‘money is love and this is because 54 Andrew Lattas money marks...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2007) 54 (1): 35–67.
Published: 01 January 2007
... of life in colonial Michoacán is given by a Spaniard who was ultimately denouncing a black for counter- feit visions of the Virgin Mary. The denouncer also blamed native culture, specifically indigenous women, for the fact that racially mixed children ate meat on days prohibited by the church...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2013) 60 (3): 385–402.
Published: 01 July 2013
... No title . 9 February . 1890 No title . 6 February . 1891 No title . 7 February . 1893 No title . 6 February . 1906a No title . 9 December . 1906b “Presentation of Silver Goblet.” 29 December . Dauenhauer Nora Marks Dauenahauer Richard Black...