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Arikara

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Image
Published: 01 April 2018
Figure 4. Arikara section of Like-A-Fishhook Village, ca. 1870. Courtesy of the State Historical Society of North Dakota, A3854 Figure 4. Arikara section of Like-A-Fishhook Village, ca. 1870. Courtesy of the State Historical Society of North Dakota, A3854 More
Image
Published: 01 April 2018
Figure 7. Arikara woman drying corn on top of house, Fort Berthold, ca. 1920. Courtesy of the State Historical Society of North Dakota, 10190-02656 Figure 7. Arikara woman drying corn on top of house, Fort Berthold, ca. 1920. Courtesy of the State Historical Society of North Dakota, 10190-02656 More
Image
Published: 01 April 2018
Figure 5. Arikara Medicine Lodge at Like-A-Fishhook Village, 1872. Traditions like the Medicine Lodge ceremony are still talked about by Arikara people today. Courtesy of the State Historical Society of North Dakota, A4074 Figure 5. Arikara Medicine Lodge at Like-A-Fishhook Village, 1872 More
Image
Published: 01 April 2018
Figure 3. From left, Arikara project participants Jerry White, Rodney Howling Wolf, and Duane Fox review a map of Nishu drawn by former resident Ervin Plenty Chief Sr. in 2001. Photo by Wendi Field Murray Figure 3. From left, Arikara project participants Jerry White, Rodney Howling Wolf, and More
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2018) 65 (2): 215–246.
Published: 01 April 2018
...Figure 4. Arikara section of Like-A-Fishhook Village, ca. 1870. Courtesy of the State Historical Society of North Dakota, A3854 Figure 4. Arikara section of Like-A-Fishhook Village, ca. 1870. Courtesy of the State Historical Society of North Dakota, A3854 ...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2017) 64 (4): 449–470.
Published: 01 October 2017
...Christopher Steinke Abstract By venturing out into the channel of the Missouri River, which they navigated for much of the nineteenth century, Arikara, Mandan, and Hidatsa women evaded American surveillance as well as indigenous enemies. They transported crucial supplies back to their villages...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2019) 66 (1): 49–70.
Published: 01 January 2019
...Thomas Grillot Abstract The Standing Rock of North Dakota is not merely the namesake for an agency and a Sioux tribe. Its monumentalization as well as the publication of the legend associated with it point to the web of interactions between Indians (Lakotas, Dakotas, and Arikaras) and non-Indians...
Image
Published: 01 April 2018
Figure 2. Author Murray (left) interviews former Nishu resident Joyce Nolan at the Arikara Cultural Center in 2015. Photo by Brad Kroupa Figure 2. Author Murray (left) interviews former Nishu resident Joyce Nolan at the Arikara Cultural Center in 2015. Photo by Brad Kroupa More
Image
Published: 01 April 2018
Figure 6. Map of Nishu drawn by former resident Ervin Plenty Chief Sr. in 2001. Courtesy of the White Shield Senior Center, the Arikara Cultural Center and Delores White Figure 6. Map of Nishu drawn by former resident Ervin Plenty Chief Sr. in 2001. Courtesy of the White Shield Senior Center More
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2018) 65 (4): 675–676.
Published: 01 October 2018
... documents, they include journals of Truteau’s 1794–96 fur-trading expedition up the Missouri River from St. Louis to the Arikara nation and a “Description of the Upper Missouri,” which hold significant historical and ethnographic interest. Excerpts of these documents have been published previously, but this...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2021) 68 (1): 161–162.
Published: 01 January 2021
... village world, pushing out or subjugating Arikaras, Mandans, Hidatsas, Omahas, and Pawnees and claiming an enormous reservoir of water, grass, game, timber, and shelter. Hämäläinen frames this as “the single most important expansion in the history of the Očhéthi Šakówiŋ” (99–100). After securing control...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2003) 50 (4): 697–705.
Published: 01 October 2003
... the Smithsonian Institution’s National Anthropological Archives. History Little Owl is primarily Mandan, but his ancestry includes Hidatsa, Arikara, and Sioux. He first found the calendar in the early 1970s. His mother had...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2010) 57 (3): 357–362.
Published: 01 July 2010
... American Historic Demography Project, spon- sored by the National Endowment for Humanities (NEH). His research focused on three areas: the Upper Mississippi River (Mandan, Hidatsa, Arikara), the northern Rio Grande (Pueblo), and Eastern North America (Timucuan). He studied chronicles of...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2017) 64 (2): 329–333.
Published: 01 April 2017
.... [He] had numerous wounds [that] he owed to the Indians. Many of his friends had been shot by his side. Finally, it was his turn. I own the scalp taken from an Indian, an Arikara, when he was pursued; it was given to me by Mr. Chardon [a trader at Fort Union]. [And] Catlin made me a drawing of old...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2018) 65 (1): 129–156.
Published: 01 January 2018
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2013) 60 (4): 537–565.
Published: 01 October 2013
... . Missouri Historical Review 95 : 245 – 63 . Krause Richard A. 1972 The Leavenworth Site: Archaeology of an Historic Arikara Community . Publications in Anthropology , 3 . Lawrence : University of Kansas . Lewis G. Malcolm 1987 Indian Maps: Their Place in the History of...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2002) 49 (4): 723–741.
Published: 01 October 2002
... / sheet 16 of 193 1794–95 1795–96 44 Dakota camped on Missouri near Arikara and fought them 1809–10 1808–9 59 Little Beaver’s house burned...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2016) 63 (3): 541–570.
Published: 01 July 2016
... Institution Press . Parks Douglas R. , ed. 1993 A Fur Trader among the Arikara Indians: Jean-Baptiste Truteau’s Journal and Description of the Upper Missouri, 1794–1796 . Wedel Mildred Mott , trans. Draft in Douglas R. Park’s possession. Parr Ryan L. , Carlyle Shawn W. , and...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2012) 59 (2): 239–260.
Published: 01 April 2012
... villages, and were wandering about the prairie without any leader After leaving Bent’s Fort, the dragoon detachment arrived at another Cheyenne camp some «fty miles down the Arkansas River. The following day discharged «rearms announced the arrival of a party of Loup Pawnee and Arikara, who...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2002) 49 (2): 446–448.
Published: 01 April 2002