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Afro-descendant organizations

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Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2016) 63 (2): 327–350.
Published: 01 April 2016
... times and imagined regional genealogies of struggle against imperialism and political oppression. Copyright 2016 by American Society for Ethnohistory 2016 historical memory slave rebellion Afro-descendant organizations political identities Venezuela On 10 May 2006 we traveled through...
FIGURES
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2020) 67 (1): 149–173.
Published: 01 January 2020
.... Both communities transitioned from large agroindustrial estates to small towns in the wake of the Peruvian Agrarian Reform beginning in 1969. These narratives were first revealed through community engagement during a year (2012–13) of archaeological research on Afro-Peruvian slavery through...
FIGURES | View All (7)
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2015) 62 (2): 401–403.
Published: 01 April 2015
... by hys- terical fears. Afro-­Caribbean social organizations like the Cuban ñañigos were not all that separate from the ebullient urban street life that exploded in Havana following the rural exodus that the bloody independence wars inspired; most participants saw themselves engaged in fairly...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2006) 53 (3): 603–613.
Published: 01 July 2006
... Brazilian males into an expand- ing national army might seem an unambiguously ominous development for Afro-Brazilians as they sought to find their footing after the abolition of slavery. But in Beattie’s hands, the transformation of recruitment and service practices did not produce the outcome one might...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2006) 53 (3): 595–601.
Published: 01 July 2006
... the 1860s and 1940s. The move to incorporate more young, mostly poor Brazilian males into an expand- ing national army might seem an unambiguously ominous development for Afro-Brazilians as they sought to find their footing after the abolition of slavery. But in Beattie’s hands, the transformation...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2015) 62 (2): 361–384.
Published: 01 April 2015
...Pablo Miguel Sierra Silva This article explores the life of an elite Afro-indigenous couple in the city of Puebla de los Ángeles during the seventeenth century. Through the study of a freedman, Felipe Monsón y Mojica, and his indigenous wife, Juana María de la Cruz, I propose a new approach...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2021) 68 (2): 291–310.
Published: 01 April 2021
... Christian. Mixed, Afro-descendant women were often considered particularly vulnerable to vice and bad customs (Velázquez 2006 : 429). Although the inquisitors prepared to excommunicate María Juana, the Madre talked them down to the significantly lighter sentencing of a stern warning, a mandatory confession...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2002) 49 (3): 703–714.
Published: 01 July 2002
.... Of the first five, the predominant focus is on the historical formation of identity—of the Brazilian people as a whole, of Afro-Brazilian identity, and of three immigrant groups. One study analyzes the nature of love and human...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2005) 52 (3): 643–644.
Published: 01 July 2005
... and ecclesiastical court records, primarily from Mexico City, Bennett shows that creolization was a legal as well as a cultural process. Africans and their descendants understood their rights as Christian subjects of the Crown and they used the courts strategically to protect these rights. Afro- Mexicans also...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2005) 52 (3): 644–646.
Published: 01 July 2005
... and ecclesiastical court records, primarily from Mexico City, Bennett shows that creolization was a legal as well as a cultural process. Africans and their descendants understood their rights as Christian subjects of the Crown and they used the courts strategically to protect these rights. Afro- Mexicans also...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2005) 52 (3): 646–648.
Published: 01 July 2005
... and ecclesiastical court records, primarily from Mexico City, Bennett shows that creolization was a legal as well as a cultural process. Africans and their descendants understood their rights as Christian subjects of the Crown and they used the courts strategically to protect these rights. Afro- Mexicans also...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2005) 52 (3): 648–649.
Published: 01 July 2005
... and ecclesiastical court records, primarily from Mexico City, Bennett shows that creolization was a legal as well as a cultural process. Africans and their descendants understood their rights as Christian subjects of the Crown and they used the courts strategically to protect these rights. Afro- Mexicans also...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2005) 52 (3): 649–651.
Published: 01 July 2005
... and ecclesiastical court records, primarily from Mexico City, Bennett shows that creolization was a legal as well as a cultural process. Africans and their descendants understood their rights as Christian subjects of the Crown and they used the courts strategically to protect these rights. Afro- Mexicans also...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2005) 52 (3): 651–652.
Published: 01 July 2005
... that creolization was a legal as well as a cultural process. Africans and their descendants understood their rights as Christian subjects of the Crown and they used the courts strategically to protect these rights. Afro- Mexicans also had extralegal identities, and these records show that they formed...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2005) 52 (3): 653–655.
Published: 01 July 2005
... that creolization was a legal as well as a cultural process. Africans and their descendants understood their rights as Christian subjects of the Crown and they used the courts strategically to protect these rights. Afro- Mexicans also had extralegal identities, and these records show that they formed...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2005) 52 (3): 656–658.
Published: 01 July 2005
... and ecclesiastical court records, primarily from Mexico City, Bennett shows that creolization was a legal as well as a cultural process. Africans and their descendants understood their rights as Christian subjects of the Crown and they used the courts strategically to protect these rights. Afro- Mexicans also...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2005) 52 (3): 659–662.
Published: 01 July 2005
... that creolization was a legal as well as a cultural process. Africans and their descendants understood their rights as Christian subjects of the Crown and they used the courts strategically to protect these rights. Afro- Mexicans also had extralegal identities, and these records show that they formed...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2005) 52 (3): 663–664.
Published: 01 July 2005
... and their descendants understood their rights as Christian subjects of the Crown and they used the courts strategically to protect these rights. Afro- Mexicans also had extralegal identities, and these records show that they formed relationships based on factors including residential patterns, birth- place...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2005) 52 (3): 664–666.
Published: 01 July 2005
... and ecclesiastical court records, primarily from Mexico City, Bennett shows that creolization was a legal as well as a cultural process. Africans and their descendants understood their rights as Christian subjects of the Crown and they used the courts strategically to protect these rights. Afro- Mexicans also...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2005) 52 (3): 666–669.
Published: 01 July 2005
... that creolization was a legal as well as a cultural process. Africans and their descendants understood their rights as Christian subjects of the Crown and they used the courts strategically to protect these rights. Afro- Mexicans also had extralegal identities, and these records show that they formed...