1-20 of 343 Search Results for

���native ground,��� Colorado River

Follow your search
Access your saved searches in your account

Would you like to receive an alert when new items match your search?
Close Modal
Sort by
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2019) 66 (2): 329–352.
Published: 01 April 2019
..., it highlights Native geopolitical dominance on the Colorado and Gila Rivers, which endured until the mid-nineteenth century. Second, it reveals that Indigenous mediation constituted one dimension of late Bourbon Indian policy on “native ground.” Future studies may uncover similar practices across the Spanish...
FIGURES
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2012) 59 (2): 239–260.
Published: 01 April 2012
... of Colorado Abstract. This article analyzes the unusual trading post concentration—Fort Vas- quez, Fort Jackson, Fort Lupton, and Fort St. Vrain—that operated simultaneously along the South Platte River during the late 1830s. These trading posts, or forts, dealt almost exclusively in bison robes...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2008) 55 (3): 497–498.
Published: 01 July 2008
... at Greeley, Colorado. In debt, Meeker took a position as the Indian agent to the Utes at the remote White River Agency in northern Colorado. He believed this was his final chance to serve humanity, to teach the Utes to become civilized Christians, and to introduce them to an agricultural lifestyle...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2008) 55 (3): 499–500.
Published: 01 July 2008
... at Greeley, Colorado. In debt, Meeker took a position as the Indian agent to the Utes at the remote White River Agency in northern Colorado. He believed this was his final chance to serve humanity, to teach the Utes to become civilized Christians, and to introduce them to an agricultural lifestyle...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2008) 55 (3): 501–502.
Published: 01 July 2008
... at Greeley, Colorado. In debt, Meeker took a position as the Indian agent to the Utes at the remote White River Agency in northern Colorado. He believed this was his final chance to serve humanity, to teach the Utes to become civilized Christians, and to introduce them to an agricultural lifestyle...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2016) 63 (3): 541–570.
Published: 01 July 2016
... ). Another possible clue comes from origin stories. Like Puebloan and Navajo accounts attributing the emergence of fully formed people to the surface via hollow reeds, the Kiowa origin story involves the emergence from a hole in the ground via a hollow cottonwood log, a common tree of the Colorado Plateau...
FIGURES | View All (4)
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2007) 54 (4): 591–604.
Published: 01 October 2007
... Columbia River, 1805–1838,” Gray Whaley, unlike most of this issue’s other authors, who are breaking new ground, must confront the extreme portraits of Chinook women that have prevailed since the time Lewis and Clark’s gossipy journals became sensationalized. Seeking to reveal a social...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2011) 58 (2): 229–261.
Published: 01 April 2011
... on the Wind River Reservation, expressed no prior knowledge of the history he helped collect about Colorado. Exile from the parks region of Colorado thus also initiated a break from traditional landscape upon which a deep and exten- sive Arapaho history was inscribed and maintained for generations...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2007) 54 (4): 723–755.
Published: 01 October 2007
... to the Apache village, Ulibarri learned of an impending Ute and Comanche attack. Along the Arkansas River in Colorado, his party met Apache warriors moving to fight the Ute and Comanche, and on their return to Santa Fe, the Spaniards camped among Jicarilla Apaches who were recovering from...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2019) 66 (1): 1–20.
Published: 01 January 2019
..., Papagos, Colorado River Tribes, and San Carlos Apaches all relied on local law enforcement officials—such as the highway patrol, sheriffs, and justices of the peace—for help in making arrests and hearing criminal cases. 40 Indigenous nations also shared jail facilities with counties. 41 Over...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2015) 62 (2): 333–360.
Published: 01 April 2015
... 2014 Prehistoric Settlement Patterns in the Upper Belize River Valley and Their Implications for Models of Low-Density Urbanism . In A Celebration of the Life and Work of Pierre Robert Colas. Vol. 27 of Acta Mesoamericana . Helmke Christophe Sachse Frauke , eds. Pp. 263 – 85 . Munich...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2002) 49 (1): 205–218.
Published: 01 January 2002
... it particularly vulnerable to the economic and ideological currents that rode the Atlantic world’s extensions into the Pacific ocean. The Yuma crossing was a ford across the Colorado River just below its...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2010) 57 (3): 357–362.
Published: 01 July 2010
...-​001 Copyright 2010 by American Society for Ethnohistory 358 Kristine L. Jones Mahone, a Hualapai activist who had engaged in a decades-long pursuit of Hualapai rights to return to the Peach Springs area near the Colorado River (and who had been...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2017) 64 (1): 115–139.
Published: 01 January 2017
..., and Dumesnil, a French valet, swam across the Colorado River in southeast Texas. They were under orders from René-Robert Cavelier, sieur de La Salle, to determine whether their horses could find sure footing on the eastern bank. These men were trying to locate the Mississippi River after their colonizing...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2010) 57 (2): 225–262.
Published: 01 April 2010
... connection between the Californias and the rest of colonial New Spain after the Yuma Uprising of 1781 efectively closed the overland trail across the Colorado River Valley. Despite the success of the Dominicans in establish- ing new missions and continuing the Camino Real north to San Diego...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2021) 68 (4): 519–545.
Published: 01 October 2021
... River, with concentrations in the large extended floodplain and adjacent upland areas (Warde 2003 : 2). 2 Throughout the day Native fighters probed the US troops from positions along the ridgetops and valley floor but were held at bay by suppressive fire, and they possibly refrained from fully...
FIGURES | View All (8)
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2012) 59 (1): 199–200.
Published: 01 January 2012
...Thomas H. Guderjan Social Change and the Evolution of Ceramic Production and Distribution in a Maya Community . By Arnold Dean R. . ( Boulder : University Press of Colorado , 2008 . 351 pp., foreword, preface, references, index . $70.00 cloth.) Copyright 2012 by American...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2014) 61 (2): 376–379.
Published: 01 April 2014
....) Coffee and Community: Maya Farmers and Fair-Trade Markets . By Lyon Sarah . ( Boulder : University Press of Colorado , 2010 . ix + 266 pp., acknowledgments, introduction, illustrations, bibliography, index . $75.00 cloth, $32.95 paper.) Copyright 2014 by American Society for Ethnohistory...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2001) 48 (3): 495–514.
Published: 01 July 2001
... in its anthropological complexity, the South- west region straddling the U.S.-Mexico border has been the proving ground for much Americanist research and theory (Ortiz Doyle, Lange Parsons Wittfogel and Goldfrank Fox Faris Graced by an arid climate, intensive farming along life-giving rivers...
Journal Article
Ethnohistory (2005) 52 (4): 800–801.
Published: 01 October 2005
...Clifford T. Brown Edited by Arthur A. Demarest, Prudence M. Rice, and Don S. Rice. (Boulder:University Press of Colorado, 2004. xviii + 676 pp., preface, maps,bibliography, index. $59.95 cloth.) 2005 Book Reviews Hunters and Bureaucrats: Power, Knowledge, and Aboriginal-State Rela...