In Great Crossings, Christina Snyder documents the creation, development, and eventual closure of the Choctaw Academy located in Great Crossings, Kentucky. US expansion, racist rhetoric, and a Jacksonian ideology of white American identity during the era of forced Indian removal are all common themes as Snyder uses the Choctaw Academy and its locale to chart an “intimate view of the ambitions and struggles of Indians, settlers and slaves” in the antebellum period (16). Great Crossings itself illustrated the transformation of American identity, from one that the Indian students at the Choctaw Academy could personally join in constructing, to one of racial exclusion and forced removal. With a compelling narrative and an intertwined history located at the heart of the continent, Snyder defines a changing America through the eyes of Choctaw Academy students.

The residents, enslaved peoples, instructors, and Native students of...

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