Rani-Henrik Andersson’s A Whirlwind Passed through Our Country makes an invaluable addition to an already impressive literary catalog concerning the Ghost Dance. The author’s impressive contribution lies in his translation and inclusion of heretofore unpublished Lakota accounts of the Ghost Dance. Until now, no one had provided a clear and detailed picture of how the Lakotas perceived this new spiritual opportunity. The Ghost Dance’s arrival in Lakota country coincided with increased tribal division and a severe shortage of food, both products of American colonialism. These shaped how the Ghost Dance was perceived by a divided Lakota population. At that time, the Lakotas had diverse strategies and opinions of how to plan for life under American domination. What Andersson’s translations reveal is that for the Lakotas, the Ghost Dance’s appeal crossed “progressive” and “nonprogressive” boundaries. Ultimately, the Ghost Dance provided an alternative strategy,...

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