Margaret M. Bruchac’s Savage Kin provides an intersectional analysis of the relationship between anthropologists and their interlocutors in the first half of the twentieth century. The book complements existing scholarship on American ethnology, but vastly expands our knowledge of the many Native women and men who provided access and traditional knowledge to anthropologists. Native men such as George Hunt (Kwakwaka ‘wakw), who worked with Franz Boas, generally failed to credit their wives, among others, for the cultural information they parlayed to anthropologists. Arthur Parker ascended to the highest echelons of American intellectual culture, joining the Society of American Indians, working as special adviser to the Bureau of Indian Affairs, and working for museums and organizations devoted to the study of American Indian cultures. However, his career would not have been possible without the aid of Beulah Tahamont (Abenaki). Native men, like the...

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