This collection of thirteen essays by scholars in diverse subfields examines how Indigenous people experienced the British Empire in the transformative period from 1760 to 1840. While scholarship on the metropole’s view of the empire is now robust, this volume continually reverses that gaze to track Indigenous responses to empire, responses that varied from strategic embrace to armed resistance to relative indifference. The essayists’ major common claim is that Indigenous people were not simply acted upon by the empire and its agents. Instead, groups ranging from the Anishinaabe Odawa in the North American Great Lakes to the Fante in West Africa established pathways through which British imperialism developed in these regions, and they channeled imperial policy and practice to suit their own interests. Yet the volume does not facilely celebrate Indigenous agency. As Tony Ballantyne observes in his essay on Māori responses...

You do not currently have access to this content.