As one of North America’s leading ethnohistorians, Jennifer Brown has shaped the discipline over her forty-year career. Her work has proved invaluable for scholars of ethnohistory and related fields, and has inspired scholars to broaden the scope of research possibilities within these disciplines. Her new publication is a welcome and compelling selection of articles (some previously published, some unpublished) that focus on the stories of Cree, Ojibwe and Métis peoples, Hudson’s Bay and Northwest Company fur traders, Methodist and Anglican missionaries, and twentieth-century anthropologists. The articles explore the complexities of sociocultural interactions over space and time within what was formerly called Rupert’s Land.

Divided into six sections, the book’s material spans the early 1600s to 1870. Each section focuses on a particular theme, and section summaries describe how the chapters are linked thematically. The first section is on language—how it is translated...

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