Most scholarly work on colonial Virginia has been written as if Native Americans were central to English colonial life during the Jamestown era (1607–24), but of only marginal importance after English victories in the Second Anglo-Powhatan War (1622–32) or, at the latest, after the Anglo-Powhatan War of 1644–46. Kristalyn Shefveland contends, however, that one cannot understand post-1646 Virginia without fully incorporating Native Americans into the narrative; thus, she takes 1646 as the starting point of this analysis of the colony’s Anglo-Indian relations. Building on recent work by Robbie Ethridge, C. S. Everett, April Hatfield, Paul Kelton, Matthew Rhoades, and others, Shefveland demonstrates that Native people continued to be of central concern, and of critical structural importance, to Virginia society well into the eighteenth century. “Anglo-Native interaction,” she convincingly argues, “determined English settlement patterns, trade, and diplomacy,” and “many of the powerful families...

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