The Children of Aataentsic: A History of the Huron People to 1660 (Trigger 1976) and An Ethnography of the Huron Indians 1615–1649 (Tooker 1964) have become classic case studies in the ethnohistory of northeastern North America, yet both of these texts end their stories on or about the moment of dispersal of communities from their homelands on Georgian Bay. The edited volume considered here is a response to these earlier works, one that brings the Wendat up through the twentieth century and, indeed, through the included commentary of current tribal members, into the twenty-first. Challenging the idea that Wendat people were only a distinct people as long as they were living in their sixteenth- and seventeenth-century homelands, the authors examine different community responses to postdispersal life in a variety of Wendat communities.

Revealing shifts in the discipline, the book immediately...

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