In his second book, Indigenous London: Native Travelers at the Heart of Empire, Coll Thrush examines the “enmeshed” urban and Indigenous histories of London by probing the experiences of Indigenous men, women, and children who traveled to the city beginning in the early 1500s (23). The voyagers hailed from the British settler nation-states of Canada, the United States, Australia, and New Zealand. Combining the tools of history, literary criticism, and settler colonial studies, Thrush argues that London “has been entangled with Indigenous territories, resources, knowledges, and lives” since the British first embarked on the project of empire-building in the sixteenth century (15). Secondly, he contends that the impulse of British settler colonialism largely originated in London. Nevertheless, Native visitors seized the opportunity to shape colonial policy and defend their territorial and cultural sovereignty. Chapter 1 excavates the “unhidden city” of Indigenous...

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