The Struggle for Maize is an excellent book on global and local contentions over the production and consumption of corn. Centered on archival and anthropological study in Mexico, this book explores a range of topical issues, from the cultural importance of maize in Mexico, to the impact of international free-trade agreements on agriculture and livelihoods, to the rise of genetically modified (GM) corn in Mexico since 2001, to the changing patterns of farming and work that define that country today. The heart of the story concerns “the fate of the peasantry in an era of corporate agriculture and globalization” (1), and hence the titular focus on campesinos, the milieu of labor, and the growth of technoscience and biotechnology in contemporary rural economies and politics.

Structural adjustment policies of the World Bank and other international financial institutions and free-trade agreements with the United States have brought Mexico in line with neoliberal...

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