In Choctaw Resurgence in Mississippi, Katherine M. B. Osburn analyzes the century-long process of Choctaw nation building that produced the political and economic revitalization known as the “Choctaw Miracle.” She focuses on the “ways in which Choctaws proclaimed and performed their Indian identity for their political allies amid the class and racial conflict in rural Mississippi” (1). Her central question is how the Mississippi Band of Choctaw Indians negotiated the political and social landscape of nineteenth- and twentieth-century rural Mississippi while constructing and claiming their Indian identity. She argues persuasively that Choctaws asserted their Indian sense of nationalism through a shared identity connected to kinship, homelands, language, and other customs.

Although the 1830 Treaty of Dancing Rabbit Creek led to the removal of many Choctaws to Indian Territory, Article 14 of the treaty provided a way for Choctaws to remain in...

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