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wild garden

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Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 November 2018) 10 (2): 370–396.
Published: 01 November 2018
.... ponticum and invaded landscapes in general. © 2018 Erin Despard and Michael Gallagher 2018 This is an open access article distributed under the terms of a Creative Commons license (CC BY-NC-ND 3.0). invasive species media ecology plants landscape photography wild garden As summer approaches in...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2015) 6 (1): 73–102.
Published: 01 May 2015
...-case basis. This paper considers the epistemological implications of the digitisation of the Directors' Correspondence (DC) collection (1841-1928) at the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew, made available through the Global Plants database. In order to avoid a polarised analysis of the end-products of archive...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2015) 6 (1): 53–71.
Published: 01 May 2015
... their gardens and towns. These are not stories of distant soundscapes in remote and wild places but of companion species that make their own places through sound in the places that people make. What also becomes clear in these narratives is the importance to people of a sense of resonance with birds...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2013) 3 (1): 43–70.
Published: 01 May 2013
... wild, his flute-like songs and timbre spread throughout the local lyrebird population. We count ourselves among those who admire the sonic achievements of this bioregion's “flute lyrebirds.” These Superb Lyrebirds ( Menura novaehollandiae ) do indeed deliver an unusual and extraordinarily complex...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2013) 2 (1): 117–146.
Published: 01 May 2013
...Daegan Miller Abstract In the fall of 1846, the first of 3,000 African American settlers set foot on their 40-acre plots in the Great Northern Wilderness of New York State, a place we now call the “forever wild” wilderness of the Adirondack State Park. These black settlers were the initial wave of...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2012) 1 (1): 103–121.
Published: 01 May 2012
... interspecies relationships, which in turn shape the location of disease risks in space. I develop the term risky zoographies to signal the emergence of competing descriptions of animals and their habitats in zoonotic disease contexts. This concept suggests that as wild animals, livestock products, and...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 November 2016) 8 (2): 235–239.
Published: 01 November 2016
... graveyards had emerged as stag beetle hotspots, and we were there to count the beetles, to put decay on the map, and to help foment popular support for rot. We wanted to rewild urban parks and gardens, offering aesthetic stag beetle nesting boxes, square wooden chambers for burial filled with choice logs...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 November 2017) 9 (2): 456–459.
Published: 01 November 2017
... chapters 4 and 5. A similar set of logics can be applied to connectivity. 9. Various writings about/with Indigenous philosophies have particularly helped shape this response to dualistic thinking through foregrounding vital, embodied, and emplaced connectivities; see especially: Rose, Reports from a Wild...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2013) 3 (1): 129–147.
Published: 01 May 2013
... expect (or hope) that this forward movement will keep materializing variants of progress such as green energy, economic development for all, a gardened planet, or the blossoming of a global noosphere. How true the cliché that history is written by the victors, and how much truer for the history of the...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2016) 8 (1): 118–142.
Published: 01 May 2016
...” across three different settings of elephant care: the conventional and contested elephant enclosure of the Woodland Park Zoo in Seattle, USA; the contaminated and violent “wild” spaces of the Wayanad Wildlife Sanctuary in Kerala, in South India; and the carefully designed “household-like” spaces of the...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2016) 7 (1): 151–168.
Published: 01 May 2016
...' habitat. 1 On this particular morning, the educator scours the playground looking for any raccoons that might be hiding in the trees, in the playhouse, under the slides, in the sand box, or in the children's garden. She approaches the shed that holds the children's bikes and scooters. Opening the door...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2012) 1 (1): 57–68.
Published: 01 May 2012
... taught us about the bush tucker in the region, said the berries were in fact edible and I witnessed her eat one. 6 I could not bring myself to follow suit, and my tentativeness is preserved to this day as I find the plant is among those listed as toxic in the “Garden plants poisonous to people” index...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2012) 1 (1): 123–140.
Published: 01 May 2012
... blot out all of the noises of the forest or drive the animals away, but it does drive away the feeling that you are in another, separate, timeless, wild sphere.” 64 The book's structure also follows that of Silent Spring. Both begin by drawing on characterisations and differences between ‘natural...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2018) 10 (1): 107–128.
Published: 01 May 2018
...,” etymonline.com/index.php?term=watershed&allowed_in_frame=0 (accessed October 14, 2016). 2. Latour, We Have Never Been Modern . 3. Rose, Reports from a Wild Country (hereafter cited in the text); Cronon, “Trouble with Wilderness”; Cronon, Nature’s Metropolis . 4. Chesapeake Bay Program, Chesapeake...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2015) 6 (1): 159–165.
Published: 01 May 2015
...) stretch the imagination and can change the story. Marilyn Strathern taught me that relatives in British English were originally “logical relations” and only became “family members” in the 17th century—this is definitely among the factoids I love. 15 Go outside English, and the wild multiplies. I think...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2014) 4 (1): 1–18.
Published: 01 May 2014
..., projected into the unbounded wildness of the human imagination, thrown back 10,000 years. Sometimes, I knew, spear-nosed bats flew through the tree crowns in search of fruit, palm vipers coiled in ambush in the roots of orchids, jaguars walked the river's edge; around them eight hundred species of trees...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2015) 6 (1): 1–27.
Published: 01 May 2015
.... Some seemed to be my father's favourites, others less so. I knew which woods and which fields were the homes to a great variety of wild flowers. Each spring I picked a bunch for my mother: wood anemones from the Little Wood, primroses and blue violets from the hedges of the Gillfach. In the winter, the...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2014) 4 (1): 113–123.
Published: 01 May 2014
... climate variability.” 24 And now the newly proposed geological era of the Anthropocene bestows humans with the questionable honour of being a geologic force. It has thus become clear that being entangled with ‘us’ is not always very good for other earthly denizens: Giant Isopod No.1's wild kin, for...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2013) 2 (1): 1–20.
Published: 01 May 2013
... will endanger the wild birds and animals he enjoys watching: On any given summer day, I can see probably every bird pictured in the AUDUBON SOCIETY HANDBOOK. From the red-headed woodpecker to the Goldfinch [ sic ], from the barn swallow to the hawk. ... [C]an the DOT guarantee me the continued...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2016) 8 (1): 1–23.
Published: 01 May 2016
.... 38 Other work, such as Haraway’s canine companions 39 and Heather Paxson’s post-Pasteurian microbial cultures, 40 has orbited around critters that are good for humans to live with. Still others are studying multispecies assemblages in zones of wildness that proliferate beyond realms of human...