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Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2013) 3 (1): 1–24.
Published: 01 May 2013
...Hugo Reinert Abstract Drawing on a multi-sited study of transnational efforts to safeguard the highly endangered Lesser White-fronted Goose ( Anser Erythropus ), the text develops an argument about a certain “biopolitics of the wild”—a particular mode of governing nonhuman life, rooted in certain...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2016) 7 (1): 89–105.
Published: 01 May 2016
.... What are we to make of this wild and scenic wasteland? How can Hanford's environment simultaneously embody ruin and redemption, and what work does this constitutive contradiction do? In this article, I explore the slippery subjectivities of nuclear waste and nature. Beginning with the Hanford Reach...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 November 2017) 9 (2): 418–432.
Published: 01 November 2017
... Antarctica, I will compare the paramilitary practicalities of Antarctic research station and field camp life with the visions of the Antarctic as a place of sublime wild nature, violent death, and climate disaster. Using three signature events in Antarctic field training—predeparture, orientation, and...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2012) 1 (1): 103–121.
Published: 01 May 2012
... interspecies relationships, which in turn shape the location of disease risks in space. I develop the term risky zoographies to signal the emergence of competing descriptions of animals and their habitats in zoonotic disease contexts. This concept suggests that as wild animals, livestock products, and...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2013) 3 (1): 43–70.
Published: 01 May 2013
... wild, his flute-like songs and timbre spread throughout the local lyrebird population. We count ourselves among those who admire the sonic achievements of this bioregion's “flute lyrebirds.” These Superb Lyrebirds ( Menura novaehollandiae ) do indeed deliver an unusual and extraordinarily complex...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2015) 6 (1): 53–71.
Published: 01 May 2015
... millions of years. The loss of wildness thus elicits a loss of harmony. I consider these Anthropocene interpretations of silence, noise and dissonance by comparing the environmentalist concerns of Krause with responses to the Listening to Birds project—an anthropological investigation of bird sounds. These...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2013) 2 (1): 117–146.
Published: 01 May 2013
...Daegan Miller Abstract In the fall of 1846, the first of 3,000 African American settlers set foot on their 40-acre plots in the Great Northern Wilderness of New York State, a place we now call the “forever wild” wilderness of the Adirondack State Park. These black settlers were the initial wave of...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 November 2018) 10 (2): 370–396.
Published: 01 November 2018
.... ponticum and invaded landscapes in general. © 2018 Erin Despard and Michael Gallagher 2018 This is an open access article distributed under the terms of a Creative Commons license (CC BY-NC-ND 3.0). invasive species media ecology plants landscape photography wild garden As summer...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2019) 11 (1): 1.
Published: 01 May 2019
... reprinted books, including Hidden Histories (1991) , Dingo Makes Us Human (1992) , Nourishing Terrains (1996) , Country of the Heart (2002) , Reports from a Wild Country (2004), and Wild Dog Dreaming (2011). At the time of her death she had just completed work on a final book, Shimmer , which...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2016) 7 (1): 259–263.
Published: 01 May 2016
..., imperfect, and have some profound implications. 3 Simon Pooley, “The Entangled Relations of Humans and Nile Crocodiles in Africa, c.1840-1992,” Environment and History (2015, in press). 4 “Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora,” Article 1 (a...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 November 2016) 8 (2): 235–239.
Published: 01 November 2016
... human health. Rot even seems amiss in some of our designated wilds, at least in Western Europe. In parks and nature reserves that conservationists trim and tidy. To the chagrin of stag beetle enthusiasts and rewilders, old trees are grubbed up and dead wood chipped and burned. Shit is bagged...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 November 2018) 10 (2): 528–531.
Published: 01 November 2018
...Leah Zani © 2018 Leah Zani 2018 This is an open access article distributed under the terms of a Creative Commons license (CC BY-NC-ND 3.0). During breaks in clearing explosive ordnance from the former battlefields of Laos, bomb technicians commonly forage for wild foods. A half-century...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2016) 8 (1): 118–142.
Published: 01 May 2016
... the world around us. As the virus takes advantage of the contemporary troubles of elephants, creeping past human infrastructure and barriers and across blurred boundaries between wild and domesticated to take elephant lives, other questions arise. It is still unclear whether the virus is evolving...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2018) 10 (1): 171–186.
Published: 01 May 2018
... that are already ghosts, no-longer-wild animals that have already fallen off what van Dooren calls “the edge of extinction,” that “slow unraveling of intimately entangled ways of life that begins long before the death of the last individual.” 9 Thus data capture in wildlife conservation—making...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2016) 7 (1): 245–254.
Published: 01 May 2016
... is that glyphosate is everywhere and almost one billion monarch butterflies are missing; that freshwater biodiversity has suffered massive losses and there seems so little hope for what remains. What makes no-limits to human growth true is that the zoomass of wild vertebrates has become “vanishingly...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2013) 3 (1): 129–147.
Published: 01 May 2013
... Life 14 is a graveyard of more than extinct life forms and the effervescence of the wild. But such gossamer intimations lie almost utterly forgotten, with even the memory of their memory swiftly disappearing. So also the Earth's forgetting projects itself into humanity's future, where the forgetting...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2013) 2 (1): 43–56.
Published: 01 May 2013
... Wales, Australia and spear fish and harvest invertebrate animals. We add wild plants harvested on shore, and plants we have grown, to feed ourselves. We also hunt on land, at Cloud Range, a rural mountain country place we own, where we hunt rabbits and other animals and harvest wild plant foods...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2014) 5 (1): 283–286.
Published: 01 May 2014
... lead to management practices that reinscribe conceptual divisions between humans and “nature.” Beyond the native/invasive divide, belonging also takes the form of other categorical divisions, such as that between “wild” and “domesticated” animals and plants, and also “pest” species and those that...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2016) 7 (1): 265–270.
Published: 01 May 2016
... Meet . Minneapolis, MN : University of Minnesota Press , 2008 . Hediger H. Wild Animals in Captivity . Translated by Sircom G. . London : Butterworths Scientific Publications , 1950 . Ingold T. Being Alive: Essays on Movement, Knowledge and Description . Abingdon...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 November 2017) 9 (2): 456–459.
Published: 01 November 2017
... and 5. A similar set of logics can be applied to connectivity. 9. Various writings about/with Indigenous philosophies have particularly helped shape this response to dualistic thinking through foregrounding vital, embodied, and emplaced connectivities; see especially: Rose, Reports from a Wild...