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Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2017) 9 (1): 60–83.
Published: 01 May 2017
...Louise Hornby Abstract This article focuses on works by the Danish artist Olafur Eliasson, who has recently produced a number of large-scale and immersive installations, such as Ice Watch (2014) and, most famously, The Weather Project (2003). His human-made environments situate the human subject...
Image
Published: 01 May 2017
Figure 3. Olafur Eliasson, The Weather Project , 2003. Monofrequency lights, projection foil, haze machines, mirror foil, aluminum, scaffolding 26.7 × 22.3 × 155.44 m. Tate Modern, London, 2003. Photo by Andrew Dunkley and Marcus Leith. Courtesy of the artist; neugerriemschneider, Berlin; and More
Image
Published: 01 May 2017
Figure 4. Olafur Eliasson, The Weather Project , 2003. Monofrequency lights, projection foil, haze machines, mirror foil, aluminum, scaffolding 26.7 × 22.3 × 155.44 m. Tate Modern, London, 2003. Photo by Olafur Eliasson. Courtesy of the artist; neugerriemschneider, Berlin; and Tanya Bonakdar More
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 November 2016) 8 (2): 172–195.
Published: 01 November 2016
... change. It examines Adams’s evolving signature style of composing and/or performing with climatic elements and natural forces, and it further examines how this style effectively attunes audiences to ongoing environmental events that weather the world outside the concert hall. In other words, it...
Image
Published: 01 May 2017
Figure 4. Weathering of sandstone blocks in the Elizabeth Bay seawall. Photograph by the author Figure 4. Weathering of sandstone blocks in the Elizabeth Bay seawall. Photograph by the author More
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2015) 6 (1): 131–157.
Published: 01 May 2015
... writing as a touchstone, my essay foregrounds the environmental features of the (re)location: the extreme desert weather, the mountain vistas, the incarceree-created rock gardens, the reconstructed barracks, guard tower, and barbed wire fence, and the cemetery/monument. I bring together concepts from...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2015) 6 (1): 175–178.
Published: 01 May 2015
... in terms of the mean and variability of relevant meteorological quantities over a period of time ranging from months to thousands or millions of years.” This description conventionally relies upon 30 years of weather data. Or climate might be understood in a more general scientific sense as a...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2012) 1 (1): 85–102.
Published: 01 May 2012
..., illuminates Hillman's project and situates it within contemporary poetics. Hillman is interested in our role in the disordered weather of climate change, noting, for example, in Practical Water, “Unusually warm global warming day out” 6 ; her work with form serves to let in the “global warming” day...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2018) 10 (1): 343–347.
Published: 01 May 2018
..., future, and past,” that reimagines “bodies as archives” (“Weathering,” 558). 7. This connects with a Spinozan-Deleuzian interpretation of affect in contemporary use; another main vector in concept and practice embraces the affects as emotion states , extending the work of Silvan Tomkins. See...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2018) 10 (1): 241–256.
Published: 01 May 2018
... global warming produce similar effects. Morton, for instance, has written about the newly realized signifying powers of a previously disregarded entity like weather: “You can no longer have a routine conversation about the weather with a stranger. The presence of global warming looms into the...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2017) 9 (1): 1–17.
Published: 01 May 2017
... men lived out in the often intemperate weather: the peasant and the sailor. How they spent their time, hour by hour, depended on the state of the sky and on the seasons. We’ve lost all memory of what we owe these two types of men.” 39 While often read as nostalgically antimodernist, Serres exalts...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 November 2017) 9 (2): 418–432.
Published: 01 November 2017
... from that, our fleece midlayers, our lightweight snow pants and parka, our Extreme Cold Weather Gear (ECW), our two pairs of boots, our sun goggles, gloves, and hats were loaned to us by ANZ. After checking out our gear and stuffing it into standard issue duffel bags, we watched a compulsory...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2012) 1 (1): 103–121.
Published: 01 May 2012
.... Reacting to these dichotomous maps, the intervention team suspected that Mr. Liên believed poultry get sick because of the weather, when in ‘reality’ poultry contract disease via viral transmission between human and nonhuman animals. This reaction reflects what development workers frequently call ‘cultural...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2014) 5 (1): 307–311.
Published: 01 May 2014
... more extreme weather, higher sea levels and new species, one spectacle of the Anthropocene is loss: loss of biodiversity, species, scientific literacy; and we are losing the protection once offered by the nation state as many local ecological problems are part of an intractable global tapestry, which...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 November 2016) 8 (2): 149–171.
Published: 01 November 2016
... had previously been used in some of the operations of the Cold War, landing fuel on enemy soil. Thus the “battle with lava” was partly informed by Cold War concerns with planetary scale, earthquakes, and unusual weather, 45 precursors to Anthropocenic concerns with damaging and irreversible climate...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2014) 5 (1): 101–123.
Published: 01 May 2014
... would like to thank the editors and the anonymous reviewers for constructive suggestions and support that helped to improve the paper. 1. The Boston Globe. Don't like the weather? Change it 2005-07-03 2. Wired News. Climate Engineering is doable, as long as we never stop 2007-07-25...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2015) 6 (1): 1–27.
Published: 01 May 2015
... made for over 20 years. I look, every time, to the far horizon, to the very edge of the land(scape), however that might be determined by light, weather and cloud. It is never the same. Sometimes a rainy day shuts it right down, nothing (much) to see. The distance is an absence. On other occasions...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2014) 5 (1): 261–276.
Published: 01 May 2014
... White is usually invoked by ecocritics today only in order to cudgel Christianity, his work prefigures various ecocritical attempts to engage with environmental history—for example, Jonathan Bate's rereading of Romantic poetry in the context of the bad weather caused by the Tambora volcanic eruption of...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2017) 9 (1): 40–59.
Published: 01 May 2017
...Figure 4. Weathering of sandstone blocks in the Elizabeth Bay seawall. Photograph by the author Figure 4. Weathering of sandstone blocks in the Elizabeth Bay seawall. Photograph by the author ...
Journal Article
Environmental Humanities (1 May 2018) 10 (1): 295–309.
Published: 01 May 2018
... the weather bad. The wind suddenly died down, and this, Lindow claims, acted as the releasing stimulus. Because this friend was in Norway, in the process of acquiring a Norwegian cultural identity, what she then experienced was a troll. Lindow concludes by pointing out that this model “helps us...